Cambridgeshire & Peterborough Adults Mental Health Support

How can I help myself?

LOOKING AFTER YOUR WELLBEING

There are lots of things you can do to help yourself stay well and have good wellbeing: including eating well, spending time with others, getting a good night's sleep and taking some regular exercise. Many of the things that are good for our physical health are also good for keeping our minds well too.

Some people find the '5 Ways to Wellbeing' a useful way of thinking about how you can look after your wellbeing:

1. Connect with the people around you and make time for family or friends.                  

2. Be active - Go for a run, play football, cycle to college or sign up for a dance class...whatever it is, make sure it is something you enjoy. 

3. Take notice – Pay attention to your senses – what can you see, feel, taste, smell and hear?

4. Keep learning – Try something new, be it a new recipe or taking up an evening class.

5. Give - Do something nice for a friend, or a stranger. Thank someone. Smile :) Volunteer your time. It can be incredibly rewarding.

Making a few small changes to your lifestyle could make a big difference, these websites might be able to help:

-Lets Get Moving Cambridgeshire LogoLet's Get Moving Cambridgeshire aims to improve the health of the Cambridgeshire population, specifically by increasing levels of physical activity. This will be done by promoting existing opportunities, developing new opportunities, and supporting individuals that require support to achieve their goals.

-Prescription 4 Exercise Logo‘Prescription for Exercise’ (P4E) provides essential information and advice to increase physical activity. Doing more reduces your chance of disease and treats many long term conditions such as heart disease, diabetes, COPD and arthritis. It’s never too late to start as the greatest benefit is seen in those who are the least active. The ‘Health professional’ section is designed and written for clinicians and medical students.

-One You logo - Whether it’s getting more active, quitting smoking or reducing how much alcohol you drink this website can help!  

 

Want to try out mindfulness? Need a little boost? Then check out the Apps page for a little inspiration! 

MENTAL HEALTH APPS

 

The NHS App library has lots of different apps, some of which have clinical evidence to show that they help some people (these ones are labelled ‘NHS Approved’) and others are currently undergoing testing to see how effective they are.

https://apps.beta.nhs.uk/?category=Mental%20Health

SELF-HELP RESOURCES

Books 

Books on Prescription

Reading Well Books on Prescription helps you to understand and manage your health and wellbeing using self-help reading. The scheme is endorsed by health professionals and supported by public libraries.

Mood Boosting Books

Reading Well Mood-boosting Books is a national promotion of uplifting titles, including novels, poetry and non-fiction. The books are all recommended by readers and reading groups.

 

Online

MoodJuice is a website that enables you to download CBT based self help booklets
A free online CBT interactive programme for anxiety and depression.

Living Life To The Full is a free online interactive programme for anxiety and depression.

MoodGym is a CBT based resource for anxiety and depression tailored for 16-25 year olds.

 

Get Self-Help: Provides Cognitive Behavioural Therapy self-help and resources.

DOWNLOADABLE RESOURCES

Here we have lots of helpful free downloadable resources for you to check out! 

 

How CASUS Can Help Young Peoples Alcohol Leaflet  
FRANK Know The Score FRANK Cannabis FRANK Cannabis Facts
Safeguarding Children Guide (Alcohol & Drugs) BASW Pocket Guide  
Alcohol & Older People Morning After Poster Morning After Leaflet
 FAS Leaflet  Alcohol Easy Read Leaflet  Time To Reflect On Alcohol Leaflet
 Easy Read Guide To Common Drugs  Drugs Wheel  NPS Leaflet
 NPS Parents Guide  Drugs - Staying Safe  Cocaine - A Few Lines
 Cannabis Staying Alive   Help Me Understand
 You Are Not On Your Own  NPS Infographic  Hep C Testing Leaflet

 

All About Mental Health

WHAT IS MENTAL HEALTH?

We all have mental health and we all have to take care of it. It affects how we think, feel and behave as well as determining how we handle stress, relate to others and make choices. Our mental health can change over time. Some people call mental health 'emotional health' or 'wellbeing'.

What are mental health challenges?

Changes in mental health are very common, for example with the stresses and strains of life. But if these changes don’t go away, and start to affect our everyday life, this can lead to challenges with our mental health.  Over the course our lives, if we experience mental health challenges, our thinking, mood, and behaviour can be affected. Many factors contribute to mental health challenges, including our genes and life experiences.

How common are mental health problems?

Anyone can experience challenges with their mental health from mild stress to diagnosable mental health challenges, and it is thought that at any one time at least 1 person in 6 is experiencing a mental health challenge.

Mental health challenges are common but help is available and with the right support many people recover completely. Check out our Who Can Help Page for lots of services who are local and national!

ANXIETY, OCD & PHOBIAS

 Skip to: Anxiety, OCD, Phobias

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What is Anxiety?

Anxiety is a feeling of unease, such as worry or fear, that can be mild or severe.

Everyone has feelings of anxiety at some point in their life – for example, you may feel worried and anxious about sitting an exam, or having a medical test or job interview. During times like these, feeling anxious can be perfectly normal.

However, some people find it hard to control their worries. Their feelings of anxiety are more constant and can often affect their daily lives. People with anxiety challenges tend to feel anxious most days and often struggle to remember the last time they felt relaxed. As soon as one anxious thought is resolved, another may appear about a different issue.

Anxiety is the main symptom of several conditions, including:

Although feelings of anxiety at certain times are completely normal, see your GP if anxiety is affecting your daily life or causing you distress.

Who can help?

If you feel that you or someone you know could be suffering with anxiety then you can always go to your GP for help; your GP will be able to refer you over to someone who can help you get treatment. You can also self-refer yourself to services that help with Mental Health Challenges to get treatment.

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What is OCD?

Obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) is a common mental health condition in which a person has obsessive thoughts and compulsive behaviours.

It affects men, women and children and can develop at any age. Some people develop the condition early, often around puberty, but it typically develops during early adulthood.

OCD can be distressing and significantly interfere with your life, but treatment can help you keep it under control.

If you have OCD, you'll usually experience frequent obsessive thoughts and compulsive behaviours.

  • An obsession is an unwanted and unpleasant thought, image or urge that repeatedly enters your mind, causing feelings of anxiety, disgust or unease.
  • A compulsion is a repetitive behaviour or mental act that you feel you need to carry out to try to temporarily relieve the unpleasant feelings brought on by the obsessive thought.

For example, someone with an obsessive fear of their house being burgled may feel they need to check all the windows and doors are locked several times before they can leave the house.

People with OCD can be reluctant to seek help because they feel ashamed or embarrassed. But there's nothing to feel ashamed or embarrassed about. It's a health condition like any other – it doesn't mean you're "mad" and it's not your fault you have it.

Who can help?

If you know someone or yourself is struggling with OCD you can visit your GP who will be able to refer you to someone to get help. You can also refer yourself directly to services that help with OCD and other Mental Health Challenges.

The following sites may be useful sources of support:

OCD Action, OCD-UK and TOP UK can also let you know about any local support groups in your area.

What are Phobias?

A phobia is an overwhelming and debilitating fear of an object, place, situation, feeling or animal.

Phobias are more pronounced than fears. They develop when a person has an exaggerated or unrealistic sense of danger about a situation or object.

If a phobia becomes very severe, a person may organise their life around avoiding the thing that's causing them anxiety. As well as restricting their day-to-day life, it can also cause a lot of distress.

A phobia is a type of anxiety disorder. You may not experience any symptoms until you come into contact with the source of your phobia.

However, in some cases, even thinking about the source of a phobia can make a person feel anxious or panicky. This is known as anticipatory anxiety.

If you don't come into contact with the source of your phobia very often, it may not affect your everyday life.

There are a wide variety of objects or situations that someone could develop a phobia about. However, phobias can be divided into two main categories:

  • Specific or simple phobias
  • Complex phobias

Specific or simple phobias

Specific or simple phobias centre around a particular object, animal, situation or activity. They often develop during childhood or adolescence and may become less severe as you get older.

Common examples of simple phobias include:

  • Animal phobias – such as dogs, spiders, snakes or rodents
  • Environmental phobias – such as heights, deep water and germs
  • Situational phobias – such as visiting the dentist or flying
  • Bodily phobias – such as blood, vomit or having injections
  • Sexual phobias – such as performance anxiety or the fear of getting a sexually transmitted infection 

Complex phobias

Complex phobias tend to be more disabling than simple phobias. They tend to develop during adulthood and are often associated with a deep-rooted fear or anxiety about a particular situation or circumstance.

The two most common complex phobias are:

  • Agoraphobia
  • Social phobia 

Agoraphobia is often thought of as a fear of open spaces, but it's much more complex than this. Someone with agoraphobia will feel anxious about being in a place or situation where escaping may be difficult if they have a panic attack.

Social phobia, also known as social anxiety disorder, centres around feeling anxious in social situations. If you have a social phobia, you might be afraid of speaking in front of people for fear of embarrassing yourself and being humiliated in public. In severe cases, this can become debilitating and may prevent you from carrying out everyday activities, such as eating out or meeting friends.

How common are phobias?

Phobias are the most common type of anxiety disorder.

They can affect anyone, regardless of age, sex and social background. Some of the most common phobias include:

  • Arachnophobia – fear of spiders
  • Claustrophobia  – fear of confined spaces
  • Agoraphobia – fear of open spaces and public places
  • Social phobia  – fear of social situations

Who can help?

If you have a phobia, you should seek help from your GP. They may refer you to a specialist with expertise in behavioural therapy, such as a psychologist. Or you can refer yourself to a service that helps with Mental Health Challenges.

 

Mental health challenges are common but help is available and with the right support many people recover completely. Check out our Who Can Help Page for lots of services who are local and national!

DEPRESSION & BIPOLAR

Skip to: Depression, Bipolar

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What is Depression?

Depression is more than simply feeling unhappy or fed up for a few days.

Most people go through periods of feeling down, but when you're depressed you feel persistently sad for weeks or months, rather than just a few days.

Some people think depression is trivial and not a genuine health condition. They're wrong – it is a real illness with real symptoms. Depression isn't a sign of weakness or something you can "snap out of" by "pulling yourself together".

The good news is that with the right treatment and support, most people with depression can make a full recovery.

Depression affects people in different ways and can cause a wide variety of symptoms.

They range from lasting feelings of unhappiness and hopelessness, to losing interest in the things you used to enjoy and feeling very tearful. Many people with depression also have symptoms of anxiety. There can be physical symptoms too, such as feeling constantly tired, sleeping badly, having no appetite or sex drive, and various aches and pains. However, some people may have little to no physical symptoms and are functioning professionals dealing with depression.

The symptoms of depression range from mild to severe. At its mildest, you may simply feel persistently low in spirit, while severe depression can make you feel suicidal, that life is no longer worth living. Most people experience feelings of stress, unhappiness or anxiety during difficult times. A low mood may improve after a short period of time, rather than being a sign of depression.

Luckily there are many ways of treating depression, the treatment you may receive will depend on the type of depression you have.

Different Types of Depression and possible treatments:

·         Mild Depression - wait and see, exercise, self-help groups

·         Mild to Moderate Depression - talking treatment, cognitive behavioural therapy, counselling

·         Moderate to Severe Depression – antidepressants, combination therapy, mental health

What are the different treatments?

Wait and see: if you're diagnosed with mild depression, it may improve by itself. In this case, you'll be seen again by your GP after two weeks to monitor your progress. This is known as "watchful waiting".

Exercise: there's evidence that exercise can help depression, and it's one of the main treatments for mild depression. You may be referred to a qualified fitness trainer for an exercise scheme. You can also find out more about starting exercise and exercise for depression.

Self-help groups: talking through your feelings can be helpful. You could talk to a friend or relative, or you can ask your GP to suggest a local self-help group. Find out more about depression support groups. Your GP may also recommend self-help books and online cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT). 

Antidepressants: antidepressants are tablets that treat the symptoms of depression. There are almost 30 different types of antidepressant. They have to be prescribed by a doctor, usually for depression that's moderate or severe.

Combination therapy: your GP may recommend that you take a course of antidepressants plus talking therapy, particularly if your depression is quite severe. A combination of an antidepressant and CBT usually works better than having just one of these treatments.

Mental health teams: if you have severe depression, you may be referred to a mental health team made up of psychologists, psychiatrists, specialist nurses and occupational therapists. These teams often provide intensive specialist talking treatments as well as prescribed medication. 

Talking therapy: there are different types of talking therapy for depression, including cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) and counselling. Your GP can refer you for talking treatment or, in some parts of the country, you might be able to refer yourself. Some talking treatments include; Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT), Online CBT, Interpersonal Therapy (IPT), Psychodynamic Psychotherapy and counselling.

Mindfulness: Mindfulness involves paying closer attention to the present moment, and focusing on your thoughts, feelings, bodily sensations and the world around you to improve your mental wellbeing. The aim is to develop a better understanding of your mind and body, and to learn how to live with more appreciation and less anxiety.

Who can help?

It's important to seek help from your GP if you think you may be depressed. Many people wait a long time before seeking help for depression, but it's best not to delay. The sooner you see a doctor, the sooner you can be on the way to recovery. You can also refer yourself to other services designed to help with depression.

 

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What is Bipolar?

Bipolar disorder, formerly known as manic depression, is a condition that affects your moods, which can swing from one extreme to another.

People with bipolar disorder have periods or episodes of:

·         Depression – feeling very low and lethargic

You may initially be diagnosed with clinical depression before having a future manic episode (sometimes years later), after which you may be diagnosed with bipolar disorder. During an episode of depression, you may have overwhelming feelings of worthlessness, which can potentially lead to thoughts of suicide. If you're feeling suicidal or having severe depressive symptoms, contact your GP, care co-ordinator or local mental health emergency services as soon as possible.

·         Mania – feeling very high and overactive (less severe mania is known as hypomania)

During a manic phase of bipolar disorder, you may feel very happy and have lots of energy, ambitious plans and ideas. You may spend large amounts of money on things you can't afford and wouldn't normally want. Not feeling like eating or sleeping, talking quickly and becoming annoyed easily are also common characteristics of this phase. You may feel very creative and view the manic phase of bipolar as a positive experience. However, you may also experience symptoms of psychosis, where you see or hear things that aren't there or become convinced of things that aren't true

Symptoms of bipolar disorder depend on which mood you're experiencing. Unlike simple mood swings, each extreme episode of bipolar disorder can last for several weeks (or even longer), and some people may not experience a "normal" mood very often.

The high and low phases of bipolar disorder are often so extreme that they interfere with everyday life.

However, there are several options for treating bipolar disorder that can make a difference. They aim to control the effects of an episode and help someone with bipolar disorder live life as normally as possible.

The following treatment options are available:

  • medication to prevent episodes of mania, hypomania (less severe mania) and depression – these are known as mood stabilisers and are taken every day on a long-term basis
  • medication to treat the main symptoms of depression and mania when they occur
  • learning to recognise the triggers and signs of an episode of depression or mania
  • psychological treatment – such as talking therapy, which can help you deal with depression, and provides advice about how to improve your relationships
  • lifestyle advice – such as doing regular exercise, planning activities you enjoy that give you a sense of achievement, as well as advice on improving your diet and getting more sleep

It's thought using a combination of different treatment methods is the best way to control bipolar disorder.

Who’s affected?

Bipolar disorder is fairly common and one in every 100 adults will be diagnosed with the condition at some point in their life.

Bipolar disorder can occur at any age, although it often develops between the ages of 15 and 19 and rarely develops after 40. Men and women from all backgrounds are equally likely to develop bipolar disorder.

Who can help?

If you or someone you know is suffering with Bipolar Disorder, then we recommend getting help if you have not already done so. This can be by going to your GP and letting them know what is happening with your Mental Health, you can also refer yourself to a service that works with Mental Health Challenges.

 

Mental health challenges are common but help is available and with the right support many people recover completely. Check out our Who Can Help Page for lots of services who are local and national!

SELF-HARM

What is Self-Harm?

Self-harm is when someone chooses to inflict pain on themselves in some way. It is a sign of distress and can take many forms. Often self-harm is someone's way of coping with feelings and is a sign that something is wrong. Self-harm can be dangerous, and it is a sign that there is an underlying problem, therefore you should get help.

It is important to realise that self-harm is not the same as suicide, with self-harm there is not always an intention to end life like in suicide. The intention is more often to punish themselves, express their distress or relieve unbearable tension. Sometimes the reason is a mixture of both. Although the intention may not be to end life when self-harming, it is important to still get help.

Treatment for people who self-harm usually involves seeing a therapist to discuss your thoughts and feelings, and how these affect your behaviour and wellbeing. They can also teach you coping strategies to help prevent further episodes of self-harm. If you're badly depressed, it could also involve taking antidepressants or other medication.

Who can help?

If you're self-harming, you should see your GP for help. They can refer you to healthcare professionals at a local community mental health service for further assessment. This assessment will result in your care team working out a treatment plan with you to help with your distress.

Below are some organisations that give more information on ways to cope with self-harm, you can also speak to your GP for further support.

There are organisations that offer support and advice for people who self-harm, as well as their friends and families. These include:

 

Mental health challenges are common but help is available and with the right support many people recover completely. Check out our Who Can Help Page for lots of services who are local and national!

SEXUAL VIOLENCE

What is Sexual Violence?

Sexual assault is any sexual act that a person did not consent to, or is forced into against their will. It is a form of sexual violence and includes rape (an assault involving penetration of the vagina, anus or mouth), or other sexual offences, such as groping, forced kissing, child sexual abuse or the torture of a person in a sexual manner.
Sexual assault is an act that is carried out without the victim’s active consent. This means they didn’t agree to it. It is not uncommon for a victim of sexual assault to have no physical injuries or signs of their assault. But sexual assault is still a crime and can be reported to the police in the same way as other crimes.

What to do if you need help:

If you've been sexually assaulted, there are services that can help. You don’t have to report the assault to police if you don’t want to. You may need time to think about what has happened to you. However, consider getting medical help as soon as possible, because you may be at risk of pregnancy or sexually transmiitted infections (STIs). If you want the crime to be investigated, the sooner a forensiic medical examination takes place, the better.

Try not to wash or change your clothes immediately after a sexual assault. This may destroy forensic evidence that could be important if you decide to report the assault to the police.

The following services will also provide treatment or support, and can refer you to another service if you need more specialist help (such as a sexual assault referral centre also referred to as SARC):

Sexual assault referral centres (SARCs) offer medical, practical and emotional support. They have specially trained doctors, nurses and support workers to care for you.

Services here to help:

  • Cambridge Rape Crisis Centre - Deliver a range of support services to women and children in Cambridgeshire who are survivors of rape, sexual abuse and violence.
  • Peterborough Rape Crisis Centre is committed to supporting and empowering female survivors of rape and sexual abuse, regardless of race, ethnicity, sexuality, age and other discriminatory factors respecting individual lifestyles through the provision of a confidential telephone help line, a face to face support service and other appropriate support mechanisms.
  • Victim Support - As an independent charity, we work towards a world where people affected by crime or traumatic events get the support they need and the respect they deserve. We help people feel safer and find the strength to move beyond crime. Our support is free, confidential and tailored to your needs.
  • The Survivors Trust - Living with the consequences of rape and sexual abuse can be devastating. At TST, we believe that all survivors are entitled to receive the best possible response to their needs whether or not they choose to report.
  • Women's Aid - We believe everyone has the human right to live in safety and free from violence and abuse. Women are the overwhelming majority of victims of domestic abuse. Domestic abuse is a violation of women and their children’s human rights. It is the result of an abuse of power and control, and is rooted in the historical status and inequality of women in in society.
  • Survivors UK - We offer individual counselling, group work and helpline services from our base in Shadwell, London E1 for men who have been victims of domestic and sexual abuse.
  • Cambridgeshire Independent Sexual Violance Advisor (ISVA Service) - ISVA offers a Professional support and advise and a counselling service to survivors. Accepts Self and Professional referrals. An Independent Sexual Violence Advisor (ISVA) is trained to look after your needs, and to ensure that you receive care and understanding. Click here for info about - who are ISVA, who are CHISVA and ISVA's Service Guide.
  • GALOP - LGBT+ anti-violence charity. If you’ve experienced hate crime, sexual violence or domestic abuse, we’re here for you. We also support lesbian, gay, bi, trans and queer people who have had problems with the police or have questions about the criminal justice system.

 

Mental health challenges are common but help is available and with the right support many people recover completely. Check out our Who Can Help Page for lots of services who are local and national!

 

DOMESTIC VIOLENCE

What is Domestic Abuse? 

Domestic violence or abuse can happen to anyone. Domestic violence, also called domestic abuse, includes physical, emotional and sexual abuse in couple relationships or between family members.

Domestic violence can happen against women and against men, and anybody can be an abuser. If you're worried someone might see you have been on this page, find out how to cover your tracks online.

Signs of domestic violence and abuse

These are different kinds of abuse, but it's always about having power and control over you. If you answer yes to any of the following questions, you might be in an abusive relationship. 

Emotional Abuse

Does your partner ever: 

  • belittle you, or put you down?
  • blame you for the abuse or arguments?
  • deny that abuse is happening, or play it down?
  • isolate you from your family and friends?
  • stop you going to college or work?
  • make unreasonable demands for your attention?
  • accuse you of flirting or having affairs?
  • tell you what to wear, who to see, where to go, and what to think?
  • control your money, or not give you enough to buy food or other essential things?

Physical Abuse

Does your partner ever:

  • threaten to hurt or kill you?
  • destroy things that belong to you?
  • stand over you, invade your personal space?
  • threaten to kill themselves or the children?
  • read your emails, texts or letters?
  • harass or follow you?

Sexual Abuse

Sexual abuse can happen to anyone, whether they're male or female.

Does your partner ever:

  • touch you in a way you don't want to be touched?
  • make unwanted sexual demands?
  • hurt you during sex?
  • pressure you to have unsafe sex – for example, not using a condom?
  • pressure you to have sex?

If you decide to leave

The first step in escaping an abusive situation is realising that you're not alone and it's not your fault. If you're considering leaving, be careful who you tell. It's important your partner doesn't know where you're going.

Before you go, try to get advice from an organisation such as:

Women's Aid has useful information about making a safety plan that applies to both women and men, including advice if you decide to leave.

Other sources for support and help

  • Refuge - helpline: 0808 2000 247 (freephone 24 hour National Domestic Violence Helpline run with Women’s Aid), helpline@refuge.org.uk
  • Men's Advice Line - helpline: 0808 801 0327 (Mon to Fri: 9am to 5pm), info@mensadviceline.org.uk, Confidential helpline for all men (in heterosexual or same-sex relationships) experiencing domestic violence by a current or ex-partner.
  • Respect - helpline: 0808 802 4040 (Mon to Fri: 9am to 5pm), info@respectphoneline.org.uk, Runs support services and programmes for people who inflict violence in relationships, including young men and women. Also runs the men's advice line, as above.
  • Respect not fear - Website for young people about domestic violence.
  • The Hide Out - Women's Aid website to help young people understand domestic abuse, and how to take positive action if it's happening to them.
  • The Forced Marriage Unit - helpline: 020 7008 0151, fmu@fco.gov.uk, Joint initiative between the Foreign Office and Home Office. It assists actual and potential victims of forced marriage, as well as professionals working in the social, educational and health sectors.
  • Ashiana Sheffield - helpline: 0114 255 5740, info@ashianasheffield.org.uk, aims to help prevent murder and serious harm to black, Asian, minority ethnic and refugee women in England, Wales and Scotland as a result of domestic abuse and forced marriage and 'honor'-based violence. Also supports children and young people.
  • GALOP - LGBT+ anti-violence charity. If you’ve experienced hate crime, sexual violence or domestic abuse, we’re here for you. We also support lesbian, gay, bi, trans and queer people who have had problems with the police or have questions about the criminal justice system.

 

Mental health challenges are common but help is available and with the right support many people recover completely. Check out our Who Can Help Page for lots of services who are local and national!

EATING DISORDERS

What are eating disorders?

Eating disorders are a range of conditions that can affect someone physically, psychologically and socially, regardless of gender, age or size. A person with an eating disorder may focus excessively on their weight and shape, leading them to make unhealthy choices about food with damaging results to their health.

Although serious, eating disorders are treatable conditions and full recovery is possible. The sooner someone gets the treatment they need, the more likely they are to make a full recovery. Eating disorders are complex; there’s no single cause and not all symptoms will apply to all people.

Anorexia Nervosa and Bulimia Nervosa are the most commonly spoke about eating disorders. However, there are several types of eating disorders and all of them are important.

Some of the main eating disorders are as follows:

  • Anorexia Nervosa -

People who have anorexia try to keep their weight as low as possible by not eating enough food or exercising too much, or both. This can make them very ill because they start to starve. They often have a distorted image of their bodies, thinking they are fat even when they are underweight. Men and women of any age can get anorexia, but it's most common in young women and typically starts in the mid-teens. 

  • Bulimia Nervosa - 

People who have bulimia go through periods where they eat a lot of food in a very short amount of time (binge eating) and then make themselves sick, use laxatives (medication to help them go to the toilet) or do excessive exercise, or a combination of these, to try to stop themselves gaining weight. Men and women of any age can get bulimia, but it's most common in young women and typically starts in the mid to late teens.

  • Binge Eating Disorder - 

Binge eating disorder involves regularly eating large portions of food all at once until you feel uncomfortably full, and then often upset or guilty. Binges are often planned in advance and the person may buy "special" binge foods. Men and women of any age can get binge eating disorder, but it typically starts in the late teens or early 20s.

  • Orthorexia -

It is currently not recognised in a clinical setting as a separate eating disorder, so you would not be officially diagnosed with “orthorexia” at the doctors, but the term would likely be brought up in discussion. Orthorexia refers to an unhealthy obsession with eating “pure” food. Food considered “pure” or “impure” can vary from person to person. This doesn’t mean that anyone who subscribes to a healthy eating plan or diet is suffering from orthorexia. As with other eating disorders, the eating behaviour involved – “healthy” or “clean” eating in this case – is used to cope with negative thoughts and feelings, or to feel in control. Someone using food in this way might feel extremely anxious or guilty if they eat food they feel is unhealthy.

  • Other Specified Feeding or Eating Disorder (OSFED) - 

It is common for symptoms to not fit with the exact diagnostic criteria for anorexia, bulimia, or binge eating disorder, so it is classed as an OSFED – OSFED accounts for a large percentage of eating disorders.

Examples of OSFED's are: 

-  Atypical anorexia – where someone has all the symptoms a doctor looks for to diagnose anorexia, except their weight remains within a “normal” range.

-  Bulimia nervosa (of low frequency and/or limited duration) – where someone has all of the symptoms of bulimia, except the binge/purge cycles don’t happen as often or over as long a period of time as doctors would expect.

-  Binge eating disorder (of low frequency and/or limited duration) – where someone has all of the symptoms of binge eating disorder, except the binges don’t happen as often or over as long a period of time as doctors would expect.

-  Purging disorder – where someone purges, for example by being sick or using laxatives, to affect their weight or shape, but this isn’t as part of binge/purge cycles.

-  Night eating syndrome – where someone repeatedly eats at night, either after waking up from sleep, or by eating a lot of food after their evening meal.

 

Eating disorders do not always involve the physical aspect of being thin, someone with a normal or high BMI may still have an eating disorder; you just may not be able to see it. If you or someone you know could be suffering with an eating disorder, it is important to get help. You can always go to your GP who can pass you on to services and people who can give you support and advice.

 

Who can help?

If you are worried that you may have an eating disorder, visit your GP for support and access the following websites for more information:

  • Beat – has a range of services including a helpline and access to chat groups that can offer support if you are living with an eating disorder, or if you are supporting someone through recovery.
  • National Centre for Eating Disorders - Has information and professional training involving all eating disorders.
  • SEED - We are a group of ordinary people with first hand experience of eating disorders, who make a difference to those people whose lives are blighted by this devastating illness. All services can be accessed through self-referral. We provide support and services for people living in Hull East Riding and Out of Area.
  • MGEDT (Men Get Eating Disorders Too) - Men Get Eating Disorders Too’ is an award winning national charity dedicated to representing and supporting the needs of men with eating disorders. They provide essential information that is specific to the unique needs of men and an online space for men to get their voices heard as well as offer peer support via our forum.
  • Overeaters Anonymous - Overeaters Anonymous is a fellowship of individuals who, through shared experience, strength and hope are recovering from compulsive overeating. Welcomes everyone who wants to stop eating compulsively.
  • Weight Concern - The charity is committed to developing and researching new treatments for obesity. It is also working to increase the availability of the successful treatments it has pioneered in the UK via self-help programmes, self-help support groups and family based childhood obesity treatment.
  • Weight Wise - managed by the British Dietetic Association (BDA), with unbiased, easy-to-follow hints and tips - based on the latest evidence - to help you manage your weight for good. It will help you take a look at your current eating habits and physical activity levels, and offer a practical approach to setting your own goals for lifestyle change.
  • British Nutrition Foundation - Promotes the wellbeing of society through the impartial interpretation and effective dissemination of scientifically based knowledge and advice on the relationship between diet, physical activity and health.
  • Recover Your Life - One of the biggest and best Self Harm Support Communities on the Internet, offers help on a variety of topics surrounding self harm, including self injury, eating disorders, mental health issues, abuse and bullying, as well as drugs and alcohol and first aid.
  • The Mix - The Mix is a website for young adults. It has advice and will help you take on any challenge you’re facing - from mental health, eating disorders to money, from homelessness to finding a job, from break-ups to drugs. Talk to them via online, social or their free confidential helpline.
  • NHS Choices -website.

 

Mental health challenges are common but help is available and with the right support many people recover completely. Check out our Who Can Help Page for lots of services who are local and national!

DRUG/ALCOHOL ABUSE

What is Drug and Alcohol Abuse?

Drug and Alcohol abuse is when someone is addicted to taking drugs or drinking or both, and cannot stop taking drugs/drinking when they choose as it is more than a matter of willpower.

Many people do not understand why people become addicted to drugs and alcohol. They mistakenly view drug abuse and addiction as strictly a social problem and may characterize those who take drugs or drink as morally weak. One very common belief is that drink/drug abusers should be able to just stop taking drugs if they are only willing to change their behavior. This is not the case.

What people often underestimate is the complexity of drug and drink addiction. It is a disease that impacts the brain, and because of that, stopping drink and drug abuse is not simply a matter of willpower. Through scientific advances we now know much more about how exactly drugs work in the brain, and we also know that drug and drink addiction can be successfully treated to help people who want to stop abusing drugs/alcohol and live a full happy life.

Some people become addicted to drugs and alcohol due to many reasons. They may suffer from other mental health challenges, for example; depression, and the only way they feel like themselves again is by drinking or taking drugs. There’s a different story behind every drink/drug addiction and all of them are valid. What is also important is wanting to get help and finding services that will allow you to get help.

Who can help?

Your GP is a good place to start. They can discuss your problems with you and get you into treatment. They may offer you treatment at the practice or refer you to your local drink or drug service.

If you're not comfortable talking to your GP, you can approach your local drug/drink treatment service yourself.

Drug Addiction Treatments

Depending on your personal circumstances and also what you're addicted to, when you seek help you may be given a keyworker who will work with you to plan the right treatment for you

There are different types of treatment available. These include

·         Residential treatment – Residential treatment involves living at a facility and getting away from work, school, family, friends, and addiction triggers while undergoing intensive treatment. Residential treatment can last from a few days to several months.

·         Day treatment/Partial hospitalization – Partial hospitalization is for people who require ongoing medical monitoring but wish to still live at home and have a stable living environment. These treatment programs usually meet at a treatment center for 7 to 8 hours during the day, then you return home at night.

·         Outpatient treatment – Not a live-in treatment program, these outpatient programs can be scheduled around work or school. You’re treated during the day or evening but don’t stay overnight. The major focus is relapse prevention.

·         Sober living communities – Living in a sober house normally follows an intensive treatment program such as residential treatment. You live with other recovering addicts in a safe, supportive, and drug-free environment. Sober living facilities are useful if you have nowhere to go or you’re worried that returning home too soon will lead to relapse

Within your treatment, there is likely to be therapies and other treatments to help you get clean. These may include: 

·         Talking therapies – talking therapies, such as cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT), help you to see how your thoughts and feelings affect your behavior.

·         Treatment with medicines – if you are dependent on heroin or another opioid drug, you may be offered a substitute drug, such as methadone. This means you can get on with your treatment without having to worry about withdrawing or buying street drugs.

·         Detoxification (detox) – this is for people who want to stop taking opioid drugs like heroin completely. It helps you to cope with the withdrawal symptoms.

·         Self-help – some people find support groups like Narcotics Anonymous helpful. Your keyworker can tell you where your nearest group is. 

·         Reducing harm – your drugs workers will help you reduce the risks associated with your drug-taking. You may be offered testing and treatment for hepatitis or HIV, for example.

Where will you have your treatment?

You may have your treatment while living at home or as a hospital inpatient.

If your drug-related problems are severe or complicated you may be referred to a residential rehab.

For more information about residential rehab, or to find a rehab near you, you can visit rehabonline.

Drink Addiction Treatments

 The treatment options for alcohol misuse depend on the extent of your drinking and whether you're trying to drink less (moderation) or give up drinking completely (abstinence). It is a good idea to go your GP and talk to them about your concerns and goals. Your GP may suggest different types of assessment and support options available to you such as from the local community alcohol services. You can also ask about any free local support groups and other alcohol counselling that may suit you.

If you are worried about your drinking, you may be offered a short counselling session known as a brief intervention. A brief intervention lasts about 5 to 10 minutes, and covers risks associated with your pattern of drinking, advice about reducing the amount you drink, alcohol support networks available to you, and any emotional issues around your drinking

Moderation or Abstinence

Moderation or abstinence are treatment options if you're: 

·         Regularly drinking more than the lower-risk daily levels of alcohol – 14 units a week

·         Experiencing health problems directly related to alcohol

·         Unable to function without alcohol (alcohol dependency) 

Cutting alcohol out completely will have a greater health benefit. However, moderation is often a more realistic goal, or at least a first step on the way to abstinence.

Ultimately, the choice is yours, but there are circumstances where abstinence is strongly recommended, including if you

·         Have liver damage, such as liver disease or cirrhosis

·         Have other medical problems, such as heart disease, that can be made worse by drinking

·         Are taking medication that can react badly with alcohol, such as antipsychotics

·         Are pregnant or planning to become pregnant

Abstinence may also be recommended if you've previously been unsuccessful with moderation.

If you choose moderation, you'll probably be asked to attend further counselling sessions so your progress can be assessed, and further treatment and advice can be provided if needed. You may also have regular blood tests so the health of your liver can be carefully monitored. 

Your treatment may include

·         Alcohol Detoxification:

If you need medication to help you stop drinking, it can often be taken at home or when attending a local service daily.

However, some people will need a short stay in a 24-hour medically-supported unit so they can receive safe treatment of their withdrawal symptoms or other problems.

This may be in an NHS inpatient unit, or in a medically-supported residential service, depending on your situation and the assessed medical need. 

·         Intensive Rehabilitation:

Some people are assessed as needing intensive rehabilitation and recovery support for a period after they stop drinking completely; either through attending a programme of intensive support in their local community or by attending a residential rehabilitation service.

This type of intensive treatment is usually reserved for people with medium or high levels of alcohol dependence, and particularly those who have received other forms of help previously that have not been successful.

Who can help?

There are a number of specialist alcohol services that provide help and support for people with a dependence on alcohol or drugs and their friends and family.

  • Drinkline - is the national alcohol helpline. If you're worried about your own or someone else's drinking, you can call this free helpline, in complete confidence. Call 0300 123 1110 (weekdays 9am – 8pm, weekends 11am – 4pm).
  • Inclusion - Inclusion provide adult drug & alcohol treatment services across the county of Cambridgeshire. The contract includes all community drug and alcohol treatment interventions. 1-2-1 support, Group therapy, Detoxification if required and opportunity to apply for rehabilitation services. Inclusion has several services, for example:

Needle Exchange - Inclusion supports a Countywide needle exchange programme as part of their commitment to reducing the potential spread of blood borne viruses. Details of where you can access these services can be found here.

Family/Carer Support - Inclusion offers a support service for the families of adults who misuse drugs or alcohol. They are able to offer a safe and confidential place to talk, offer information and coping strategies, and signpost to other relevant services.
To find out more access the ‘Families Zone’ click here.

Recovery Champions - Recovery champions are fundamental to the on-going support of service users accessing treatment. Inclusion is constantly seeking to utililise the skills of those individuals having experienced treatment and who are committed to recovery. If you feel you would like to support others in treatment please click here.

  • Narcotics Anonymous - A non-profit fellowship or society of men and women for whom drugs had become a major problem. We are recovering addicts who meet regularly to help each other stay clean. This is a program of complete abstinence from all drugs. The only requirement for membership is to stop using.
  • Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) - is a free self-help group. Its "12-step" programme involves getting sober with the help of regular support groups.
  • Al-Anon Family Groups - offer support and understanding to the families and friends of problem drinkers, whether they're still drinking or not.
  • Cocaine Anonymous - Cocaine Anonymous is a fellowship of men and women who share their experience, strength and hope with each other so that they may solve their common problem and help others to recover from their addiction. The only requirement for membership is a desire to stop using cocaine and all other mind-altering substances. There are no dues or fees for membership; we are fully self supporting through our own contributions.
  • Talk to Frank - support line for anyone with questions/concerns surrounding drugs.

  • Aspire - Aspire is available to provide support for those with substance misuse issues and support for their families and carers within the Peterborough area.

  • Addaction - is a UK-wide treatment agency that helps individuals, families and communities to manage the effects of drug and alcohol misuse.

  • Adfam - is a national charity working with families affected by drugs and alcohol. Adfam operates an online message board and database of local support groups.

  • The National Association for Children of Alcoholics (Nacoa) - provides a free, confidential telephone and email helpline for children of alcohol-dependent parents and others concerned with their welfare. Call 0800 358 3456 for the Nacoa helpline.
  • SMART Recovery - groups help participants decide whether they have a problem, build up their motivation to change and offer a set of proven tools and techniques to support recovery.
  • CASUS (Cambridgeshire Child & Adolescent Substance Use Service) - Telephone: 01480 445316 Email at: casus@cpft.nhs.uk
  • Recovery Cafes : free, regular, no appointments needed, drop-in cafes where you can find lots of information on recovery from drug and alcohol use, chats with others in recovery and enjoy a free tea or coffee on us.

    Cambridge: The Edge Café, Brookfield NHS Site, Mill Rd, CB1 3DF, Every Thursday 12-3pm

    Huntingdon: Alexs Café, High Street, Huningdon, Every Wednesday 12-2pm

    Ely: The Countess Free Church, Ely, Every Monday 10am – 12pm

    For more information on the Cafes please call Sun Network on 01480 276057

 

There are lots of tips and tricks to help you stay in control of your drinking, whatever the situation. What are your drinking levels like? Find out here:

You’ll find lots of tips, and other information here:

Downloadable Mobile Apps:

Use the NHS Choices interactive tools to calculate alcohol units, assess your drinking levels and track your drinking over time.

If you have an iPhone or iPod touch you can download the drinks tracker from the iTunes app store for free.

 

For more services here to help, check out our Who Can Help Me Page!

SOCIAL ISOLATION

What Is Social Isolation?

Spending time alone is a good thing, and some people require more alone time than others. Introverts, for example, enjoy spending lots of time alone and can feel drained through social interaction, whereas extroverts prefer the company of others and are recharged through social interaction.

Social isolation is typically considered unhealthy when people spend excessive time alone, particularly when they no longer benefit from time spent alone. Socially isolating oneself can mean staying home for days, not talking with friends or acquaintances, and generally avoiding contact with other people. Any form of contact, however limited, is likely to remain superficial and brief, while more meaningful, extended relationships are missing.

Social isolation can increase a person’s feelings of low self-worth, shame, loneliness, depression, and other mental health concerns. Isolation itself is not a diagnosis, but it can be a symptom of depression, social anxiety, or agoraphobia. Other things that impair social skills can lead to isolation, though not necessarily by choice, for example; physical disabilities, homelessness or hoarding.

When deciding to tackle your isolation, remember to take it slowly. You could try:

  • You can start by going somewhere where you won’t be expected to talk to people but still be around them, like going to the cinema.
  • Talk to your GP, you may be able to do some social anxiety treatments to help you manage any other mental health challenges that may be holding you back.
  • Catch up with a family member or friend and let them know how you’re feeling.
  • You could find a class or group that involves a hobby you enjoy, and take along someone you know for support.
  • Volunteer at a local charity or community project. Helping others is great for improving your mental health.
  • Join an online community. This is a good start when meeting new people as going out to meet new people in person can be daunting.

Below is a list of some services that are here to help tackle social isolation and some of its causes.

  • Mind - Cambridge MIND have a mentoring scheme through which volunteer mentors can assist existing service users towards achieving a particular goal/s. What exactly is involved is agreed together with the mentor, client and one of our project workers when they set up the mentoring agreement. The main point to take is that to access this mentoring scheme the individual would need to be accessing our services as a client initially. Mind also have support for loneliness which can be found here.
  • Spice - Spice is a charity that has developed a system of Time Credits as a way of recognising and celebrating the time people give and encouraging more new people to get involved in volunteering. A Time Credit is ‘earned’ for an hour of volunteering and can then be ‘spent’ on an hour of something that person enjoys, such as the theatre, swimming or learning new skills.  Spice has a wide network of places that accept Time Credits, from local opportunities in Cambridgeshire to national opportunities such as the Tower of London and the British Museum.
  • Wintercomfort - Wintercomfort supports people who are homeless or at risk of losing their homes in Cambridge. They offer a safe place where people can feel welcome and valued, basic amenities such as meals, showers and laundry facilities. The also offer a range of educational and recreational activities, opportunities to access other agencies (e.g. health service), legal advice and meaningful work and volunteering opportunities through our social enterprises.
  • Make Do And Mend - A creative and cooperative outlet for people with mental health needs to socialise and learn new skills through strengths-based workshops which are low-cost, sustainable, flexible and environmentally friendly. There is £10 joining cost.  A referral needs to be completed, but self-referrals are accepted. All activities are kept as low cost as possible.  A donation is asked for tea’s and coffees at activities attended.

Mental health challenges are common but help is available and with the right support many people recover completely. Check out our Who Can Help Page for lots of services who are local and national!

PERSONALITY DISORDERS

What is a personality disorder?

A person with a personality disorder thinks, feels, behaves or relates to others very differently from person to person. Someone with a personality disorder may also have other mental health challenges, such as depression or drug/alcohol addictions. It is important to realise that although you may have a personality disorder, your personality disorder is not all that you are, you are still a member of society like everyone else, you just have a mental health challenge and our mental health challenges do no define who we are as people.

There are several different types of personality disorder; and not any two people will have the same symptoms, emotions and challenges.

In mental health, the word ‘personality’ refers to the collection of characteristics or traits that we have developed as we have grown up and which make each of us an individual. These include the ways that we:

  • Think
  • Feel
  • Behave

By our late teens, or early 20s, most of us have developed our own personality. We have our own ways of thinking, feeling and behaving. These stay pretty much the same for the rest of our life. Usually, our personality allows us to get on reasonably well with other people.

For some of us, this doesn't happen. For whatever reason, parts of your personality can develop in ways that make it difficult for you to live with yourself and/or with other people. You may not be able to learn from the things that happen to you. You find that you can't change the bits of your personality (traits) that cause the issues. These traits, although they are part of who you are, just go on making life difficult for you - and often for other people as well. 

Other people may have noticed these traits from your childhood and early teens. For example, you may find it difficult to:

  • Make or keep close relationships
  • Get on with people at work
  • Get on with friends and family
  • Keep out of trouble
  • Control your feelings or behaviour
  • Listen to other people

If this makes you unhappy or distressed and/or often upset or harm other people, then you may have a personality disorder.

What are the symptoms?

Symptoms vary depending on the type of personality disorder. You may also find that you have some symptoms of a personality disorder depending on what is happening within your life, for example if you've experienced a trauma or loss; and some of these symptoms are natural reactions to what has happened to you and will usually subside with some time. However, if you usually have these symptoms day to day and you are struggling to find a reason then you may want to consider that you could have a personality disorder.

Research suggests that personality disorders tend to fall into three groups according to the different emotional traits, these are as follows:

Cluster A - 'Odd or Eccentric' :

  • Paranoid - suspicious, feel that other people are being nasty to you (when evidence shows this isn't true), feeling easily rejected and tends to hold grudges.
  • Schizoid - emotionally cold, don't like contact with other people, prefer your own company and have a rich fantasy world.
  • Schizotypal - eccentric behavior, odd ideas, difficulties with thinking, lack of emotion or inappropriate emotional reactions, see or hear strange things and sometimes related to schizophrenia the mental health challenge.

Cluster B - 'Dramatic, Emotional or Erratic' :

  • Antisocial, dissocial – don’t care much about the feelings of others, easily get frustrated, tend to be aggressive, commit crimes, find it difficult to make close relationships, impulsive (do things on the spur of the moment without thinking about them), don’t feel guilty about htings you’ve done and don’t learn from unpleasant experiences.
  • Borderline, or Emotionally Unstable – impulsive, find it hard to control your emotions, feel bad about yourself, often self-harm, feel empty, make relationships quickly – but easily lose them, can feel paranoid or depressed and when stressed, may hear voices.
  • Histrionic – over-dramatrise events, self-centred, have strong emotions which change quickly and don’t last long, can be suggestible, worry a lot about your appearance, crave new things and excitement and can be seductive.
  • Narcissistic –have a strong sense of your own self-importance, dream of unlimited success, power and intellectual brilliance, crave attention from other people, but show few warm feelings in return, take advantage of other people and ask for favours that you do not then return.

Cluster C - 'Anxious and Fearful' :

  • Obsessive-Compulsive (aka Anankastic) – worry and doubt a lot, perfectionist (always check things), rigid in what you do, stick to routines, cautious, preoccupied with detail, worry about doing the wrong thing, find it hard to adapt to new situations, often have high moral standards, judgemental, sensitive to criticism and can have obsessional thoughts and images (although these are not as bad as those in obsessive-compulsive disorder).
  • Avoidant (aka Anxious/Avoidant) – very anxious and tense, worry a lot, feel insecure and inferior, have to be liked and accepted and extremely sensitive to criticism.
  • Dependent – passive, rely on others to make decisions for you, do what other people want you to do, find it hard to cope with daily chores, feel hopeless and incompetent and easily feel abandoned by others.

The symptoms and difficulties you can experience may not fit exactly into any one of these categories. You may see aspects of yourself in more than one category.

If you or someone you know may be suffering with a personality disorder then there are services available for you to get help. Your GP is a good place to start and they may be able to refer you to services to get help.

Services available to help you:

  • Springbank Cambridgeshire and Peterborough NHS - Springbank is a 12-bed inpatient recovery unit for women with a diagnosis of borderline personality disorder (BPD) who are struggling to cope with the demands of life outside of hospital, despite the input from community psychiatric services. Funded by CPFT.
  • Cambridgeshire and Peterborough NHS Community Team – Offer assessment and treatment advise, support, care plans and specialist interventions. Funded by CPFT.
  • Rethink - Offer loads of helpful links to services and information/advice.
  • Time to Change - Offers helpful advice on where you can get help and you can see other peoples stories.
  • ELEFriends - Elefriends is a friendly, supportive online community for anyone experiencing a mental health challenge.
  • MIND – Mind is a mental health charity that offers lots of helpful advice and services.

 

Mental health challenges are common but help is available and with the right support many people recover completely. Check out our Who Can Help Page for lots of services who are local and national!

PREGNANCY

While many people are aware that you can become depressed after having a baby, it's less well known that many women experience anxiety during and after pregnancy. In fact, it's common to experience depression and anxiety together.

Depression and anxiety are the most common mental health challenges during pregnancy, with around 12% of women experiencing depression and 13% experiencing anxiety at some point; many women will experience both. Depression and anxiety also affect 15-20% of women in the first year after childbirth. During pregnancy and the postnatal period, anxiety disorders, including Panic Disorder, Generalised Anxiety Disorder (GAD), Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD), Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) and Tokophobia (an extreme fear of childbirth), can occur on their own or can coexist with depression.

Perinatal anxiety and depression are mental health challenges experienced during pregnancy or in the year after childbirth. You might hear it called:

  • Perinatal or antenatal anxiety and/or depression if you experience anxiety during pregnancy.
  • Postnatal anxiety and/or depression if you experience it after giving birth.

Perinatal mental health challenges are those which occur during pregnancy or in the first year following the birth of a child. Perinatal mental illness affects 12-20% of women, and covers a wide range of conditions. If left untreated, it can have significant and long lasting effects on the woman and her family. Perinatal mental health challenges can also have long-standing effects on children’s emotional, social and cognitive development.

There are different types of depression and anxiety that can happen during and post-pregnancy:

  • Postpartum ‘blues’: (affecting 60-80% of all new mothers) is often expressed as frequent and prolonged crying, anxiety, irritability, poor sleep, quick mood changes and a sense of vulnerability. It usually occurs within the first three days following birth, continues for up to two weeks and is usually self-limiting.
  • Postpartum depression & anxiety: (affecting 15-20% of all new mothers) is more debilitating and longer lasting than the ‘blues’ and is characterized by despondency, tearfulness and more intense feelings of inadequacy, guilt, anxiety and fatigue. There may also be physical symptoms such as headaches and rapid heart rate. A lack of feeling for the baby is of special concern. These feelings can appear any time during the first few months to one year after the birth. Unfortunately, women experiencing this form of depression rarely seek treatment although almost all respond well.
  • Postpartum post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) following childbirth: is usually triggered by trauma during the time leading up to, during delivery or shortly afterwards. It can effect up to 6% of mothers. The trauma leads the women feeling that either her life or the life of her baby is at risk.
  • Postpartum psychosis:(found in 0.1% of new mothers) is a serious, but relatively rare disorder, with reactions such as extreme confusion, refusal to eat, delusions, auditory hallucinations, hyperactivity and rapid or irrational speech. Most of these reactions occur within 3-14 days following the birth. Psychosis is serious and requires immediate medical attention and at times medication and hospitalization.

How do I know if I have perinatal or postnatal depression or anxiety?

A mother may:

  • Feel constantly tired
  • Cry often for no apparent reason
  • Feel panicky
  • Worry excessively about her own or the baby’s health
  • Have a lack of feeling for the baby
  • Have difficulty sleeping or eating
  • Have problems concentrating
  • Have frightening thoughts or fantasies
  • Feel an overwhelming sense of loss

What are the treatments?

There are a range of treatment options for depression and anxiety, any of which you might find useful to treat perinatal and postnatal anxiety and/or depression.

  • Talking treatments. You're likely to be offered cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) or your local mental health services may run specific counselling or group programmes for anxiety. You can speak to your doctor, or contact your local services to find out what they offer.
  • Self-help resources. Your doctor could give you access to online CBT programmes, or prescribe self-help books to help you learn to manage your anxiety.
  • Medication. There are several different drugs that can be helpful in managing anxiety. If you have any concerns about taking medication during pregnancy or breastfeeding, you can always discuss this with your doctor.

You may be offered a combination of medication and a talking treatment. Many people find that taking medication helps them feel stable enough to get the most out of a talking treatment. However, other people find medication or talking treatments alone are more helpful.

If there are long waiting lists for talking treatments in your area, your doctor may recommend that you try an antidepressant to help you manage your mental health in the meantime.

What can I do to help myself?

Although the best way to treat depression is to seek help from a healthcare professional, there are steps you can take yourself to reduce your chances of developing depression and help you recover once you've been diagnosed.

Try to:

  • look for the positive things in your life, however hard that may seem
  • involve your partner or someone you're close to in your pregnancy and baby
  • make time to relax
  • be open about your feelings
  • ask for help with practical tasks like grocery shopping and household chores
  • find out about local support groups (check out our Who Can Help page)
  • make time to rest
  • eat well  
  • find time to have fun
  • organise small treats every day, such as a workout or a coffee with friends

Try to avoid:

  • doing too much – cut down on other commitments when you're pregnant or caring for a new baby
  • getting involved in stressful situations
  • drinking too much tea, coffee, alcohol or cola, which can stop you sleeping well
  • moving house
  • being too hard on yourself or your partner

If you're looking for other women's pregnancy challenges, here's a link to a life story about a woman who suffered with post-natal anxiety.

Who can help?

  • Anxiety UK - was established to promote the relief and rehabilitation of persons suffering from agoraphobia and associated anxiety disorders, phobias and conditions, in particular, but not exclusively, by raising awareness in such topics.
  • No Panic - No Panic is a registered charity which helps people who suffer from Panic Attacks, Phobias, Obsessive Compulsive Disorders and other related anxiety disorders including those people who are trying to give up Tranquillizers.
  • The NHS - has useful information and tips on how to cope with perinatal and postnatal depression and anxiety.
  • Tommy's - are an organisation that provides accredited midwife-led pregnancy health information for parents-to-be, and funds research into the causes of pregnancy loss.
  • PANDAS - Pre And Post Natal Depression Advice and Support (PANDAS) help support and advise any parent who is experiencing a perinatal mental illness.  They also inform and guide family members, carers, friends and employers as to how they can support someone who is suffering.
  • CPSL MIND - Mind have lots of helpful advice and information online about the different kinds of support you can get and they also run lots of workshops and courses. If you would like to self refer to Mind, We have added their Referral Form here and a link to their different services and referral forms!
  • CPSL MIND have several services available, for example: 

Connecting Mums, 6 week short intervention courses for mums who are socially isolated, this course also offers tips and tools on management and prevention for mental wellbeing. Mums can bring along their babies to the sessions and we have volunteers on hand to help look after the children while mum interacts in a group environment, babies are in the same room as mums. We deliver these from a number of different children’s centres in Peterborough.

Mums Matter, 8 week targeted intervention course, this course is for Mums who are that bit more poorly, we deliver the courses in children’s centres and pay for a crèche for the children, the crèche is always in the same building as the mums and we work with the mums in a separate room, this course is designed to help mums manage the everyday and dispel the myths. We use tools such as CBT, mindfulness, meditation and work on self-esteem.

We are launching a Mums Monthly Peers Support group that will be starting on the 2nd July 2018, this will be held at First Steps Children’s Centre, it will take place on the first Monday of each month from 1000 – 1200, this is a peer led support group and the volunteers that lead the group have accessed our services. Mums can bring children along to the group.

CPSL MIND can accept Mums who are pregnant and have a child who is up to 2 years old, Mums can self-refer by contacting them on 01733 362990 or they can accept professional or other organisations referrals.

Local Support - Cambridgeshire and Peterborough Local Authority Support: 

  • Health Visiting service– The health visiting service is a universal-progressive, needs-led, evidence-based service for children to age 5 years and their families, delivered by specialist community public health nurses.

    Family Nurse Partnership- The Family Nurse Partnership (FNP) is a structured home visiting parenting programme, delivered by specially trained family nurses, from early pregnancy until the child is two years old to vulnerable teenage mothers. The family nurse and the young parent(s) commit to an average of 64 planned home visits over two and a half years.

    Peterborough Connecting Mums- Cambridgeshire, Peterborough & South Lincolnshire MIND (formerly Peterborough & Fenland MIND) deliver perinatal mental health programmes. Peterborough City Council have commissioned this organisation to deliver 5 perinatal mental health programmes per annum (Connecting Mums & Mums Matter), which have been specifically designed, piloted and evidenced by CPSL MIND.

    Presently, the programmes only operate in Peterborough and have an annual reach target of 45 women, although some partners/family members are also supported in a 'supporter' session, which is part of the Mums Matter course. From a commissioning perspective, the local authority are continuing to invest in this for the 2018/19 financial year, however ongoing funding is unclear; it is anticipated that this need will be picked up through the Better Births transformation.

    Early Help Hub - Single point of contact for all Early Help Assessments, Family Plans and Reviews that have been completed by any agency. Here's the Cambridge County Council Support Hub website.

    Child & Family Centres/Children’s centres- Deliver evidence-based parenting programmes and targeted support for Domestic Abuse in conjunction with the Early Help offer.

    Health Improvement antenatal- Address lifestyle/behavioural factors- smoking, diet & obesity, physical activity, drugs & alcohol, sexual health. Delivered by Everyone Health  in Cambridgeshire and Solutions for Health in Peterborough.

Mental health challenges are common but help is available and with the right support many people recover completely. Check out our Who Can Help Page for lots of services who are local and national!

SCHIZOPHRENIA

What is Schizophrenia?

Schizophrenia is a severe long-term mental health challenge. It causes a range of different psychological symptoms.

Doctors often describe schizophrenia as a type of psychosis. This means the person may not always be able to distinguish their own thoughts and ideas from reality.

Symptoms of schizophrenia include: 

  • Hallucinations – hearing or seeing things that don't exist
  • Delusions – unusual beliefs not based on reality 
  • Muddled thoughts based on hallucinations or delusions
  • Changes in behaviour

Some people think schizophrenia causes a "split personality" or violent behaviour. This is not true. The cause of any violent behaviour is usually drug or alcohol misuse. When someone with schizophrenia is hearing voices they are not always violent or angry, they can be playful, friendly and funny.

What treatments are there?

Schizophrenia is usually treated with a combination of medication and therapy tailored to each individual. In most cases, this will be antipsychotic medicines and cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT).

People with schizophrenia usually receive help from a community mental health team, which offers day-to-day support and treatment.

Many people recover from schizophrenia, although they may have periods when symptoms return (relapses). Support and treatment can help reduce the impact the condition has on daily life.

If schizophrenia is well managed, it's possible to reduce the chance of severe relapses.

This can include:

·         Recognising the signs of an acute episode

·         Taking medication as prescribed

·         Talking to others about the condition

There are many charities and support groups offering help and advice on living with schizophrenia. Most people find it comforting talking to others with a similar condition.

Who can help?

If you or someone you know is experiencing symptoms of schizophrenia, see your GP as soon as possible. The earlier schizophrenia is treated, the better. There's no single test for schizophrenia. It's usually diagnosed after an assessment by a mental health care professional, such as a psychiatrist. You can also refer yourself to services that offer help and support for people with Schizophrenia and other Mental Health Challenges.

 

Mental health challenges are common but help is available and with the right support many people recover completely. Check out our Who Can Help Page for lots of services who are local and national!

PTSD

What is PTSD?

Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a type of anxiety disorder which you may develop after being involved in, or witnessing, traumatic events. The condition was first recognized in war veterans and has been known by a variety of names, such as 'shell shock'. But it's not only diagnosed in soldiers – a wide range of traumatic experiences can cause PTSD.

When is it diagnosed?

When you go through something you find traumatic it's understandable to experience some symptoms associated with PTSD afterwards, such as feeling numb or having trouble sleeping. This is sometimes described as an 'acute stress reaction'.

Many people find that these symptoms disappear within a few weeks, but if your symptoms last for longer than a month, you might be given a diagnosis of PTSD. Your GP might refer you to a specialist before this if your symptoms are particularly severe.

Are there different types of PTSD?

If you are given a diagnosis of PTSD, you might be told that you have mild, moderate or severe PTSD. This explains what sort of impact your symptoms are having on you currently – it's not a description of how frightening or upsetting your experiences might have been.

PTSD may be described differently in some situations:

  • Delayed-onset PTSD – if your symptoms emerge more than six months after experiencing trauma, this might be described as 'delayed PTSD' or 'delayed-onset PTSD'.
  • Complex PTSD – if you experienced trauma at an early age or it lasted for a long time, you might be given a diagnosis of 'complex PTSD'. (See our page on complex PTSD for more information.)
  • Birth trauma – PTSD that develops after a traumatic experience of childbirth is also known as 'birth trauma'. (See our page on PTSD and birth trauma for more information.)

There are lots of misconceptions about PTSD. For example, people may wrongly assume it means you are 'dwelling' on past events. They might even suggest that you should 'get over it' or 'move on'. But having PTSD isn't a choice or a sign of weakness, and it's important to remember that you are not alone.

For more information you can visit the following websites:

  • NHS - NHS website with helpful info on PTSD and other mental health issues.
  • PTSD UK - PTSD UK is a charity which aims to educate and raise awareness of Post Traumatic Stress Disorder; it's causes, symptoms and the treatments available, to help everyone experiencing PTSD.
  • The Warriors Journey - This service focuses on helping people who are ex-forces with their ptsd. The vision of The Warrior’s Journey is that warriors and their families will live in wholeness and be equipped to navigate the issues of life.
  • Anxiety UK - Anxiety UK was established to promote the relief and rehabilitation of persons suffering from agoraphobia and associated anxiety disorders, phobias and conditions, in particular, but not exclusively, by raising awareness in such topics.

 

Mental health challenges are common but help is available and with the right support many people recover completely. Check out our Who Can Help Page for lots of services who are local and national!

OLDER PEOPLE

CLICK HERE TO SKIP TO: Depression, Anxiety, Bereavement, Insomnia, Social Isolation & Loneliness, Memory Problems, Services Here To Help!

We all have mental health and we all need to take care of it, especially as we get older. It affects how we think feel and behave as well as determining how we handle stress, relate to others and make choices. Our mental health changes over time so we need to stay up to date we how to handle changes in our emotional wellbeing.

Are there many triggers for mental health challenges?

There are several potential triggers for mental challenges in older people, for example; physical disabilities, long-term illness (e.g. cancer or heart disease), dementia, change of environment, illness or loss of a loved one, medications and alcohol or substance abuse.

The most common condition that is spoken about when talking about older people is dementia/alzheimer’s disease; however, this is not the only challenge that people face when getting older. It is common for some older people to develop several different mental health challenges and it is just as important for older people to get help as it is for younger people.

Older people can develop any number of mental health challenges, the following are some which are more well-known:

  • Depression

Depression is the most common mental health challenge in older people, and is a very common challenge faced by people of all ages too. This can develop due to lots of reasons regardless of age; such as, loss of a loved one or friend, changes in surroundings, physical disabilities, money, relationships, family and many other reasons.

Older adults can present with the same symptoms as younger adults: Core symptoms (low mood, reduced enjoyment, lack of energy), psychological symptoms (low self-esteem, hopelessness/guilt, suicidal thoughts), and biological symptoms (reduced appetite, weight loss, feeling lower in morning, early wakening, reduced sleep, poor concentration, agitation or slowness).

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  • Anxiety 

Anxiety challenges are common in older people, and can happen alongside depression. Anxiety can develop due to lots of reasons, such as, loss of a loved one or friend, changes in surroundings, physical disabilities and many other reasons, just like depression.

Fears or worries about aging is popular among older people, as lots of things begin to change. Health worries and issues are common and come hand in hand with aging, as our bodies are not always what they used to be. Mobility can decrease and weight can fluctuate and change which can cause stress. There are lots of causes of anxiety in older people and it cannot always be pinpointed down to one thing.

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  • Bereavement challenges

Bereavement can happen to anyone at any age, but it is still important for older people to recognise that you can still get help regardless of your age. If you’ve has a death of a loved one, family member or friend, it is important to remember that the feelings you may be having are not bad or wrong. They are a normal part of bereavement and there aren’t any easily found reasons to explain how you’re feeling.

You could feel fear, anxiety, depression, anger, guilt and loneliness. These are all perfectly normal and you can get help to cope with them from several services. You may even find that you’re struggling to keep on top of things you would normally do day to day like housework. This is all normal, and help is out there for you, you can check out our services pages here for a list of services who can help.

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  • Insomnia

Insomnia is something that can happen as we all get older; there are lots of reasons why insomnia could develop and everyone’s circumstances are different. Key causes for insomnia can include: going through menopause for women, other hormonal changes, changes in brain activity, changes in natural sleep patterns (time of the year- days getting longer/shorter), medications, social changes, anxiety and depression.

If you’re suffering with insomnia, regardless of age, it is recommended that you seek some help; this can be by going to your local GP or referring yourself to mental health services which will be happy to help.

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  • Social Isolation and Loneliness

Social Isolation and Loneliness are two different concepts, but often go hand in hand when it comes to mental health. Social Isolation refers to the separation from social or familial contact, community involvement or access to services. Loneliness however, can be understood as a person having a feeling of a sense of lacking of these things to the extent where they are wanted or needed. Both challenges can go hand in hand although they are different.

It is possible for someone to be isolated without feeling lonely, and lonely without being isolated. For example, an older person could be physically isolated (living on one’s own, not seeing many people) without feeling lonely, a person could be isolated by choice and want physical separation. In a similar way, someone could feel lonely when surrounded by lots of other people. For example, if someone has experienced a loss and family has gathered for support, you can still feel lonely.

The good news is that there are lots of ways that this can be helped. There are lots of services around that have been created in order to improve loneliness and social isolation, all of which can offer helpful advice and support; some often host events which can bring people suffering in the same way together. You can check out lots of support services available on our Who Else Can Help Me? Page.

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  • Memory Problems

Memory problems can happen to anyone, regardless of age, but it is stereotypically linked with aging. Memory problems and challenges do not necessarily mean you have Dementia. If you are worried about your memory, you should speak to your GP and they may be able to refer you on to services for help. For example, the CPFTs memory assessment services require a GP referral.

Here's the stats: 1 in 6 people over the age of 80 have dementia. But There are over 40,000 people under 65 with dementia in the UK.

Dementia is a syndrome (a group of related symptoms) associated with an ongoing decline of brain functioning. This may include problems with memory loss, thinking speed, mental sharpness and quickness, language, understanding, judgement, mood, movement and difficulties carrying out daily activities

There are many different causes of dementia. People often get confused about the difference between Alzheimer's disease and dementia. 

Alzheimer's disease is a type of dementia and, together with vascular dementia (caused by reduced blood flow to the brain), makes up the vast majority of cases. There are several things that people suffering with dementia can experience. For example:

-  They can become apathetic or uninterested in their usual activities, or may have problems controlling their emotions. 

Social situations could be found challenging and interest in socializing can be lost.

Aspects of their personality may change.

-  They may lose empathy (understanding and compassion), they may see or hear things that other people do not (hallucinations).

-  Losing the ability to remember events or fully understand their environment or situations, it can seem as if they're not telling the truth, or are wilfully ignoring problems, when they actually cannot remember.

-  As dementia affects a person's mental abilities, they may find planning and organising difficult.

-  Maintaining a person with dementia’s independence may also become a problem; someone with dementia will therefore usually need help from friends or relatives, including help with decision making.

Suffering with dementia can take its toll on you and the people around you, but the good thing is that there are support services out there to help you and give advice and help you through tough times. Check out our Who Else Can Help Me? page for more services!

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If you are worried that you or someone you know may have a mental health challenge, visit your GP for support and you can access the following websites for more information:

  • AgeUK - Age UK's vision is to make the UK a great place to grow older. They do this by inspiring, supporting and enabling in a number of ways.
  • Alzheimer's Society - This site has great information about getting help and getting involved in supporting people with Alzheimer's.
  • Dementia UK - This site offers support and helpful information about dementia and how you can get in touch for more help and info.
  • Psychological Wellbeing Service The CPFT(Cambridgeshire & Peterborough NHS Foundation Trust) Psychological Wellbeing Service is part of the Improving Access to Psychological Therapies (IAPT) services.  Our aim is to make psychological therapies more accessible to people experiencing common mental health problems such as depression and anxiety. You can self-refer using their online form or by calling them up!
  • MindEd For Families - MindEd for Families supports parents and those caring for children and young people in their family when they are concerned about a young person’s mental health or well-being. They also provide support for older people and their families when they are concerned about mental health and well-being, either their own or other family members.

 

Mental health challenges are common but help is available and with the right support many people recover completely. Check out our Who Can Help Page for lots of services who are local and national!

DEMENTIA

What is Dementia?

Dementia is a term used to describe a range of disorders or conditions that are affecting the brain. There are several types of dementia, the most common and well known one is Alzheimer's disease. You can have Dementia at any age, not just as you get older, and everyone diagnosed with dementia will experience their own unique symptoms

What are the most common types of Dementia?

The most common types of Dementia are as follows:

Alzheimer's Disease - symptoms are usually mild to begin with and then worsen over time. (Difficulty with language, depressed or agitated and may withdraw from family and friends, memory lapses, problems with special awareness, difficulty making decisions, problem solving and/or disorientation of time or place, a person not recognizing a familiar face.)

Vascular Dementia - caused by small blood clots preventing oxygen getting to the brain. (Progression can be quite erratic as a person my not have a series of blood clots for sometime. People suffering will usually appear to be 'getting better', this is usually temporary, as the damage to the brain can eventually lead to difficulties; e.g. with daily living, attention, memory, decision making and motivation.) 

Frontotemporal - More common under the age of 65. Frontotemporal Dementia represents a group of conditions which are caused due to nerve cells in the brain dying and the nerve pathways becoming damaged in the frontal and temporal lobes of the brain. (Behavioural Variant Frontotemporal Dementia symptoms can be: changes in behavior or personality, apathy, obsessive or repetitive behaviours, loss of empathy, changes in appetite, difficulties making decisions, problem solving and concentration.)(Primary Progressive Aphasia, which consists of Semantic Dementia and Progressive Non Fluent Aphasia can have the following symptoms: language difficulties, speech or grammar problems, reduced understanding and difficulty recognizing familiar faces or objects.)

Dementia with Lewy bodies - Dementia with Lewy Bodies is caused by a build up of clumps and proteins in nerve cells in the brain, known as Lewy Bodies. (Symptoms of this are: fluctuating alertness, confusion and concentration levels, memory issues, mood changes, struggling with problem solving, spatial awareness, difficulty doing everyday tasks, tremors, slower movement, sleep disturbance, unsteadiness, an increase in falls and visual hallucinations.

 

Although there is no known cure for Dementia just yet, there is still support out there for you, anyone looking after someone with Dementia and anyone looking for more information. Here are some services here to help with Dementia:

  • Dementia UK - This site offers support and helpful information about dementia and how you can get in touch for more help and info.
  • Alzheimer's Research UK - Alzheimer’s Research UK is the UK’s leading dementia research charity, dedicated to causes, diagnosis, prevention, treatment and cure. Backed by our passionate scientists and supporters, we’re challenging the way people think about dementia, uniting the big thinkers in the field and funding the innovative science that will deliver a cure.
  • Alzheimer's Society - This site has great information about getting help and getting involved in supporting people with Alzheimer's.
  • Age UK - Age UK's vision is to make the UK a great place to grow older. They do this by inspiring, supporting and enabling in a number of ways.
  • Carers Trust Cambridgeshire, Peterborough and Norfolk - We support family carers of all ages across Cambridgeshire, Peterborough and Norfolk. We also offer flexible, professional care services to adults and children with a range of disabilities and health conditions.

For more services available for all Mental Health Challenges please check out our Who Else Can Help Me Page!

 

BEREAVEMENT

What happens when you go through bereavement?

It is devastating when you lose someone close to you. Everyone’s experience of grief is unique, but there are some common things that lots of us will feel. You might feel numb, angry, exhausted or guilty for something you did or didn’t do or say. Your mind will be distracted so you may also find it hard to concentrate as well as you would do normally. These feelings are normal and will pass, but it can take time.

Speaking to someone can help, and you may get all the support you need from family and friends. If you don’t feel able to open up to people that you know, or you feel you are struggling, then there are organisations and sources of support that can help. These include:

  • Cruse Bereavement Care - Offers face-to- face, telephone (0808 808 1677) and email (helpline@cruse.org.uk) support.
  • Help is at Hand – A booklet specifically written for those bereaved by suicide by those who have also been affected by suicide. The booklet gives practical information as well as details of further support.
  • Samaritans – Provide a safe place for you to talk. They will listen and try to understand what you’re going through and help you make your own decisions that are right for you. You can get in contact with them via telephone (116 123 [free 24 hour helpline]), email, letter or face-to- face.

Sometimes it isn’t just your own grief that you have to deal with, but that of your children. Children need time to grieve too, and it’s important to try and talk to them about their feelings as well as your own. Try to encourage them not to hide their feelings, but instead talk about them. As much as possible try to keep to the routine that your family had before the death to give a bit more stability, as hard as this may be.

These services provide specific support for young people and their families who are bereaved

  • Hope Again - Provides advice for young people after the death of someone close to them including personal stories of other young people who have been bereaved.
  •  Child Bereavement UK – supports families and educates professionals when a child or baby of any age dies or is dying, or when a child is facing bereavement.
  • Cruse Bereavement Care - Offers face-to- face, telephone (0808 808 1677) and email (helpline@cruse.org.uk) support.
  • Stars Children's Bereavement Support Service - Stars provides specialist bereavement support and counselling for any child or young person, aged 0-25 years who has experiences the death of someone close to them. We also provide support for young people when someone close to them is dying. Email: info@talktostars.org.uk, Telephone - 01223 863511.
  • Grief Encounter - A national service providing support to bereaved children and teenagers including e-counselling and materials to help to support bereaved children. Email: contact@griefencounter.org.uk, Telephone: 02083 718455.
  • Centre 33 - Provides free counselling to young people aged 13-25 years. Email: help@centre33.org.uk, Telephone: 01223 316488.
  • Compassionate Friends A charitable organisation of bereaved parents, siblings and grandparents dedicated to the support and care of other similarly bereaved family members who have suffered the death of a child or children of any age and from any cause. Email: helpline@tcf.org.uk, Telephone: 034512 32304.
  • YMCA Cambridgeshire and Peterborough - Provides free counselling to young people ages 13-25years. Email: counselling@theymca.org.uk, Telephone: 01733 373170.
  • Keep Your Head - Provides details of more services and information on children's mental health.
  • Kooth - Kooth is a free, confidential counselling service, provides mental health self-help information and support online for people aged between 11 and 19 years.

Other local healthcare services:

  • Sue Ryder Thorpe Hall Hospice - The hospice’s family support team offers individual and group support pre and post bereavement. Trained staff and volunteers also facilitate the monthly walking group Wayfinders. Support for bereaved children aged six to 11 is available through the Charlie Chimp Club.
  • Arthur Rank House Hospice, Cambridge - Offers bereavement support to the families of patients who have received care from one of their services. Keith Morrison (Chaplain), Email: keith.morrison@arhc.org.uk, Tel: 01223 675777
  • Sue Ryder St John's Hospice - Offers bereavement support to families and friends of patients cared for at the hospice. Jane Maxfield, Family Support & Bereavement Co-ordinator.
  • The Alan Hudson Day Treatment Centre - The Alan Hudson Day Treatment Centre based at North Cambs Hospital in Wisbech, is a day centre supporting people who are living with a life-limiting illness. They also run a support day three times a year for bereaved relatives.
  • Cambridge University Counselling Service - This free service is for enrolled students and staff of the University of Cambridge.
  • Anglia Ruskin University Counselling and Wellbeing Service- The Counselling and Wellbeing Service is available to all students at Anglia Ruskin University and offers a free and confidential service to promote mental health and wellbeing.

Voluntary organisations

  • Age UK - Provides advice and information for older people through an advice line‚ publications and website.
  • The Samaritans - Provide confidential emotional support at all times of day and night.
  • Cambridgeshire Consultancy in Counselling - Provides an individual counselling service with a range of fees according to ability to pay.
  • Cogwheel Trust for Counselling - The Cogwheel Trust is a charity, motivated by its Christian ethos, working throughout Cambridgeshire to improve the emotional and psychological well-being of local people. 

For more information on bereavement and dealing with grief please visit the NHS Choices bereavement webpage. Click here for a printable bereavement leaflet full of services for the Cambridgeshire and Peterborough area.

Mental health challenges are common but help is available and with the right support many people recover completely. Check out our Who Can Help Page for lots of services who are local and national!

VICTIMS & WITNESSES

Being a victim of a crime and witnessing a crime can be very traumatic. This can cause harm to your mental health, this can happen instantly or develop over time. Getting help is nothing to be ashamed of. 

If you report a crime you will be asked questions to find out how you have been affected by the crime. You may be asked about your personal circumstances to help identify if there is any additional support that you might need and to understand how you'd prefer to be contacted thereafter.

You will usually receive either a letter with information about the support available to you as a victim of crime, or a telephone call from a skilled victim and witness care coordinator.  They will work with you to assess your needs and create a personalised plan to help you cope and recover from the effects of crime. They will also ensure you receive your entitlements under the Victim’s Code of Practice, acting as your single point of contact, should you need them.

This support is also available to victims who do not wish to report a crime. If you have been a victim of a crime but don't want to report it, you can still speak with a member of the Victims and Witness’ Support coordinators. You can also go online to your local authority and they will have a victim and witness information and support area for you.

Everyone copes with the after-effects of crime differently and can vary from person to person depending on their personality, the support of friends and family and their personal circumstances. All reactions to crimes are completely normal and you should not be embarrassed.

Anyone can become a victim of crime. A victim is defined as “a person who has been harmed (physically, financially or emotionally), injured or killed as a result of a crime, accident or other event or action”. The definition of a victim can also include;

  • Families or friends of a person who has died as a result of criminal conduct
  • Families or friends of victims in fatal road collisions
  • Nominated representatives of a business that has been the subject of a criminal activity.

If you have seen or been a victim of a crime, you will be called a witness. As a witness, you play a vital role in helping solve crimes and deliver justice. The criminal justice system cannot work without witnesses and are the most important part in bringing offenders to justice. Witnesses can be:

  • Victims of crime
  • Someone who saw a crime or incident
  • Someone who knows something about a crime or incident
  • Someone with specialist knowledge
  • Someone who knows someone involved in a case, known as a character witness.

There are lots of support services out here for you; the different support services will be able to offer advice and support to help you manage your mental health challenges, we listed a few below:

The Cambridgeshire Constabulary - Provides a Hub of support and advice for victims and witnesses to help them get through the after-effects of crimes.

Victim Support (VS) - Give you the support you need to move forward. Our services are free, confidential and available to anyone in England and Wales, regardless of whether the crime has been reported or how long ago it happened. Choose from a number of ways to contact us.

GOV Website - Get free help and advice if you’ve been a victim of crime.

You & Co - You & Co is Victim Support’s youth programme that helps young people cope with the impact and effects of crime. You do not have to report the crime to the police to get support from us.

Crime Stoppers UK - an independent charity helping law enforcement to locate criminals and help solve crimes. We have an anonymous 24/7 phone number, 0800 555 111, that people can call to pass on information about crime; alternatively people can send us information anonymously via our Giving Information Form. You don't have to give your name or any of your personal details. We do not trace calls or track IP addresses.

SAMM - SAMM is a national UK Charity (No 1000598) supporting families bereaved by Murder and Manslaughter. We also provide advice and training to many agencies on issues relevant to the traumatically bereaved.

Karma Nirvana - is an award-winning British human rights charity supporting victims of honour-based abuse and forced marriage. Honour crimes are not determined by age, faith, gender or sexuality, we support and work with all victims.

SARI Stand Against Racism & Inequality (SARI) is a service user/community-oriented agency that provides support and advice to victims of hate, and promotes equality and good relations between people with protected characteristics as defined by law. Most SARI staff have some direct experience of dealing with hate motivated behaviour and all staff have a clear understanding of and commitment to the objectives of SARI.

Stone Wall - We're here to let all lesbian, gay, bi and trans people, here and abroad, know they're not alone. We believe we're stronger united, so we partner with organisations that help us create real change for the better. We have laid deep foundations across Britain - in some of our greatest institutions - so our communities can continue to find ways to flourish, and individuals can reach their full potential. We’re here to support those who can’t yet be themselves.

FASO - FASO is a voluntary organisation dedicated to supporting anyone affected by false allegations of abuse. False allegations affect people in all walks of life, in personal or professional contexts, and often without any warning or forewarning.  FASO is here to support you.

Murdered Abroad - A support group for families, partners and friends of the victims of murder and manslaughter abroad.

True Vision - True Vision is here to give you information about hate crime or incidents and how to report it. On this website, you can find out what hate crimes or hate incidents are, find out about the ways you can report them, report using the online form and find information about people that can help and support you if you have been a victim.

Equality Human Rights - We are an independent statutory body with the responsibility to encourage equality and diversity, eliminate unlawful discrimination, and protect and promote the human rights of everyone in Britain. The Commission enforces equality legislation on age, disability, gender reassignment, marriage and civil partnership, pregnancy and maternity, race, religion or belief, sex and sexual orientation – these are known as protected characteristics.

Hundred Families - Offer accurate information and practical advice for families bereaved by people with mental health problems along with evidence based resources for mental health professionals and others interested in serious violence by the mentally ill.

Support Line - SupportLine provides a confidential telephone helpline offering emotional support to any individual on any issue. The Helpline is primarily a preventative service and aims to support people before they reach the point of crisis. It is particularly aimed at those who are socially isolated, vulnerable, at risk groups and victims of any form of abuse.

Suzy Lamplugh - Our mission is to reduce the risk of violence and aggression through campaigning, education and support. We help and support people to stay safe from violence and aggression through the provision of free safety tips, managing the National Stalking Helpline and delivering community projects.

Action Fraud - Action Fraud is the UK’s national reporting centre for fraud and cyber crime where you should report fraud if you have been scammed, defrauded or experienced cyber crime.

British Transport Police - We police Britain’s railways, providing a service to rail operators, their staff and passengers across the country. This website provides advice, information and support to anyone who has been affected by a crime whilst on British Transport.

For more services here to help with your mental health challenges, check out our Who Else Can Help Me? Page!

STRESS

If you are feeling stressed, you're not alone. Stress is the feeling of being under too much mental or emotional pressure, and pressure turns into stress when you feel unable to cope. A bit of stress is normal and can help push you to do something new or difficult, but too much stress can take its toll.

There are things you can do, and people or services that can help you to get on top of what is causing you to worry. Check out One You information on stress and try some of these top tips:

Talk to Someone - Sharing how you feel can really help. Start by telling a friend, family member or someone else you can trust just how you feel. If you've tried self-help techniques and they aren't working, you could speak to a health professional who will be able to give you more guidance and suggest other sources of support.

Take Control of Money Worries - A common root of many people’s worries is money problems. There are lots of organisations that can help you manage your situation, so don’t feel alone. Visit the NHS Choices website for information on charities that can help.

Stopping Smoking - Stopping smoking is not only beneficial to your physical health, but can also improve your mental health and relieve stress. It’s a myth that smoking helps people to relax, it actually can increase anxiety and stress. There is lots of help available to support you. As a first step call the local Stop Smoking service on:

Cambridgeshire - 0800 018 4304

Peterborough - 0800 376 56 55

Get Active! Being physically active can boost your mood, sleep quality and energy, as well as reduce your risk of stress. Often the easiest way to build activity into your day is through walking or cycling instead of taking the car. Visit the One You website for more information on ways to get active or visit:

Be Well Cambridgeshire

Healthy Peterborough

Mental health challenges are common but help is available and with the right support many people recover completely. Check out our Who Can Help Page for lots of services who are local and national!

 

SLEEP

Sleep allows your mind to unwind and de-stress. It also helps your brain to make sense of the day, and enables your body to fight illnesses better. Sleep and mood effect each other, so try and boost how much good quality sleep you are getting each night.

A few tips to help you sleep well:

  • Try making a list of the things you need to do tomorrow before you go to bed so that they aren’t on your mind when you are trying to sleep.
  • If you can’t sleep, then don’t lie in bed worrying about it, get up and do something relaxing until you feel sleepy before returning to bed.
  • Moderate exercise (that raises your heart rate and makes you breathe faster and feel warmer) on a regular basis can help to relieve tension and aid sleep.
  • Cut down on caffeine, particularly in the evenings, as it can interfere with falling asleep and prevent deep sleep. Try switching to a warm milky drink or herbal tea instead.
  • Try to have a regular routine for your sleep – going to bed and getting up at roughly the same time each day can really help.
  • Avoid using phones, tablets or watching TV for around an hour before bed.
  • Think about the room you are sleeping in – is it a good temperature? Is it dark enough?

For more tips and advice on sleep visit the One You and NHS Choices websites:

One You logoNHS choices logo

Mental health challenges are common but help is available and with the right support many people recover completely. Check out our Who Can Help Page for lots of services who are local and national!

WORKING IN THE EMERGENCY SERVICES

If you’re someone that works within the emergency services, it’s likely you’ve been face to face with difficult and potentially traumatic situations. It’s important to keep your mental wellbeing healthy, as you live with this day-in day-out, and it’s what gets you through the stressful situations you see every day in your job.

Working in an environment where you are helping other peoples traumatic and stressful situations every day doesn’t mean you aren’t allowed to have mental health challenges of your own. Mental health challenges are completely normal and are different for everyone. Your mental wellbeing is just as important as physical wellbeing, and you need to maintain both in order to stay fit and healthy.

Your mental wellbeing can be affected by work-related factors like:

  • Repeated exposure to traumatic events
  • Workload pressures
  • Long working hours
  • Lone working
  • Dealing with people who may be physically or verbally abusive

There are lots of ways you can get some help if you feel that you’re struggling with your mental wellbeing. You can talk to your GP, refer yourself to mental health services or you can talk to friends and family about it.

Here’s a list of services available to help:

Policing Services:

  • The Police Treatment Centres provide timely and effective treatment and support for our police family patients, in order to improve their health, fitness and wellbeing.
  • Blue Lamp Foundation  Blue Lamp Foundation helps support our injured emergency services heroes.
  • Flint House The flint house provides planned rehabilitation services for both mental and physical health to warranted serving police officers, retired police officers, special constables, PC SO’s and designated detention officers.
  • Safe Horizon SHUK is a charity that provides support and assistance when dealing with mental health stigma and Disability Discrimination in the workplace.  We understand the impact of psychological injury on you, your work and your relationships.
  • Disabled Police Association Our Association seeks to ensure the fair treatment of everyone in the police service, but works particularly hard to ensure that it is the ability of disabled officers and staff that is recognised, rather than the employee’s limitations.
  • MIND Blue Light Infoline The Blue Light Infoline offers confidential, independent and practical support, advice and signposting around mental health and wellbeing. The Infoline is just for emergency service staff, volunteers and their families, to help keep you or those you care about well for work.

Ambulance Services:

  • The Ambulance Staff Charity (TASC) We provide confidential, impartial and independent advice and access to a range of support services, including rehabilitation when recovering from illness or injury, mental health support; bereavement support; debt and welfare advice; financial grants and other support.
  • Blue Lamp Foundation  Blue Lamp Foundation helps support our injured emergency services heroes.
  • MIND Blue Light Infoline The Blue Light Infoline offers confidential, independent and practical support, advice and signposting around mental health and wellbeing. The Infoline is just for emergency service staff, volunteers and their families, to help keep you or those you care about well for work.

Fire and Rescue:

  • The Fire Fighters Charity Provides support with rehabilitation, health and wellbeing, nursing, recuperation, children/family, advice, support and much more.
  • The Big White Wall Big White Wall is an online mental health and wellbeing service offering self-help programmes, creative outlets and a community that cares. When you're dealing with everyday stressors or major life events, they'll help you get through it.
  • Women In The Fire Service Formally known as Networking Women in the Fire Service, WFS was formed in 1993.  It is a voluntary, not for profit organisation with members from across all roles within the FRS community which offers support and advice.
  • Blue Lamp Foundation  Blue Lamp Foundation helps support our injured emergency services heroes.
  • MIND Blue Light Infoline The Blue Light Infoline offers confidential, independent and practical support, advice and signposting around mental health and wellbeing. The Infoline is just for emergency service staff, volunteers and their families, to help keep you or those you care about well for work.

Search and Rescue:

  • Blue Lamp Foundation  Blue Lamp Foundation helps support our injured emergency services heroes.
  • MIND Blue Light Infoline The Blue Light Infoline offers confidential, independent and practical support, advice and signposting around mental health and wellbeing. The Infoline is just for emergency service staff, volunteers and their families, to help keep you or those you care about well for work.

 

LONG-TERM CONDITIONS

Managing your Well-Being with a Long-Term Condition:

Living with a long term health condition can take its toll on your mental well-being. Long-term conditions can lead to frustration, anxiety, low mood and other mental health challenges. If you live with a long-term health condition it does not mean you will suffer with mental health challenges, everybody had mental health and we all cope with stress and things like health conditions in our own ways. 

 

Managing your well-being with diabetes:

Having the long-term condition of diabetes means that you have to juggle managing your condition along with everyday life. This can be very overwhelming, stressful and can cause frustration. Changes in mood are very common because of this. Research suggests that if you have diabetes, you are more likely to experience challenges with anxiety and depression.

National clinical health guidelines have demonstrated that cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) is useful for people who are struggling with managing their diabetes. CBT can enhance peoples’ understanding of diabetes care and has also been shown to improve mood and glycaemic control.

Finding Support

CPFT Psychological Well-being Service works alongside and collaborates with GPs, hospitals, diabetes specialist nurses and consultants.  We will help you recognise if you are experiencing anxiety or depression and how this might affect health and management of your diabetes.  Therapists have training and experience in working with people with diabetes and other physical health conditions. Together, we will be able to talk about the range of therapy options that would be most helpful and suitable for you.

 

Managing your well-being with a heart condition:

People living with heart conditions typically experience higher rates of mental health challenges. Some research suggests that you can be three times more likely to suffer with anxiety and/or depression if you are living with a heart condition. Anxiety is the most common symptom (77%) and over half (51%) of people with a heart condition experience symptoms of depression. Despite these strong feelings, many people do not speak to anyone about the emotional or psychological impacts of having a heart condition.  

It can be really helpful to talk with someone about your heart condition. Improved management of stress and depression can help support future changes to your physical and emotional health. This in turn will help to improve your cardiovascular risk profile and lower your risk of further cardiac events.

Finding Support

CPFT Psychological Well-being Service works alongside and collaborates with GPs, hospitals, cardiac specialist nurses and consultants.  We will help you recognise if you are experiencing anxiety or depression and how this might affect health and management of your heart condition.  Therapists have training and experience in working with people with cardiac conditions and other physical health problems. Together, we will be able to talk about the range of therapy options that would be most helpful and suitable for you.

 

Managing your wellbeing with Respiratory Disorders:

People living with COPD (Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease) or other chronic respiratory diseases can find themselves feeling low and/or anxious. Research shows that people with COPD are 2.5 times more likely to experience depression and anxiety than the general population. Symptoms such as breathlessness, coughing and fatigue can contribute to feelings of stress, anxiety or depression. These feelings can lead to reduced activity levels, which may worsen your condition.  Cognitive behavioural therapy techniques have proven to be successful in psycho-educational breathlessness/health promotion groups as well as individually  in primary and secondary care, with positive outcomes on: psychological wellbeing, coping strategies and use of health services.

Finding Support

CPFT Psychological Wellbeing Service works alongside and collaborates with GPs, hospitals, respiratory specialist nurses and consultants.  We will help you recognise if you are experiencing anxiety or depression and how this might affect health and management of your respiratory condition.  Therapists have training and experience in working with people with lung conditions and other physical health problems. Together, we will be able to talk about the range of therapy options that would be most helpful and suitable for you.

 

Who is CPFT's Psychological Wellbeing Service for? Is if free? And how can I refer myself?

The service is for people aged over 17 years who are normally resident in Cambridgeshire and Peterborough who are registered with a GP in one of these areas.  We do not have an upper age limit.

The service is free of charge as it is an NHS service.

You can refer yourself Here! You can also call their self-referral team on 0300 300 0055 and they will guide you through the process, let them know that you have a Long-term Condition. The telephone line is open from 9am to 5pm Mon-Fri.

The Psychological Wellbeing Service provides psychological therapy that recognises the difficulties for some patients with long-term physical health conditions including COPD, Diabetes and Cardiac disease including heart failure.

CPFT's Psychological Wellbeing Service aims to help you to improve your well-being, support you to manage your health problem and help you to look at how you can live your life in a more positive way.

We offer a range of treatment options including courses as well as individual therapy, which case take place via the telephone, online or face to face depending on the treatment you receive. The type of therapy we predominantly use is Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (see therapies section).

We are based in a variety of locations across the county to make access easier, including at our base sites in Huntingdon, Cambridge, Wisbech, March and Peterborough.  We also work out of many GP surgeries, various rooms in the community such as libraries and some hospital settings.  However, we do not see people in their own home.

Need Help Now

WHO CAN HELP

You, or someone you know, might be in crisis if:

·         You are thinking of hurting yourself or suicide seems the only option.

·         Someone you know has made threats to hurt you or someone else.

·         You are experiencing extreme distress that seems overwhelming.

Who can help in a mental health crisis?

Call 111 and press option 2 for the First Response Service -

A 24-hour service for people in a mental health crisis. This service is for anyone, of any age, living in Cambridgeshire and Peterborough*. The phone will be answered by a trained mental health professional who will be able to listen to your concerns and help you get the support you need.  They can offer advice over the phone, put you in contact with the crisis services or even refer you to a Sanctuary - safe places run by Cambridgeshire, Peterborough and South Lincolnshire Mind (CPSL Mind). 

 

 

The Peterborough and Cambridge Sanctuaries offer short-term practical and emotional support between 6pm and 1am, seven days a week. You can watch a tour of the Cambridge Sanctuary.

*People in Wisbech will not have the option 2 but can access the service via dialling 111. The call handler will then transfer them direct to the FRS service

Who can call?

If you aren't able to make the call yourself then anyone can call on your behalf, for example a friend, carer, loved one or even your GP. The service is available to anyone, of any age, currently living in Cambridgeshire and Peterborough in a mental health crisis.

For more information visit: http://www.cpft.nhs.uk/about-us/mental-health-crisis.htm

There are lots of people who can help if you're suffering with a Mental Health Challenge! 

There are several local services here to help - you can find them on our Local Services Page!

There is also a wide range of national services available to you - find these on our National Services Page!

You can check out loads of local services available in Cambridgeshire in the Lifecraft Mental Health Handbook. The Handbook is a directory of local and national mental health services, and is regularly updated. It also includes some useful services that are not specific to mental health. There are also chapters that explain relevant law and theory, plus information about statutory mental health services and professionals. You can download a free pdf version of it here!

Self help books are also out there for you if you would prefer to go down the self help road. There is the option of getting books on prescription -Reading Well Books on Prescription helps you to understand and manage your health and wellbeing using self-help reading. The scheme is endorsed by health professionals and supported by public libraries. You can also try mood boosting books - Reading Well Mood-boosting Books is a national promotion of uplifting titles, including novels, poetry and non-fiction. The books are all recommended by readers and reading groups.

 

                                                      NHS 111 Mental Health Crisis Picture

SUICIDE

Not everyone who thinks about suicide will tell someone and there are some people who give no indication at all of their intention. However, there are warning signs that we can all look out for. These include if a person is:

·         Talking or writing about death, dying or suicide.

·         Actively looking for ways to kill themselves.

·         Talking about feeling hopeless or having no reason to live.

·         Talking about being a burden to others.

·         Talking about feeling trapped or in unbearable pain.

·         Increasing their use of alcohol or drugs.

·         Suddenly very much ‘recovered’ after a period of depression.

·         Visiting or calling people unexpectedly to say goodbye either directly or indirectly.

·         Making arrangements; setting their affairs in order.

·         Giving things away, such as prized possessions.

The STOP Suicide website has lots of information on what to do if you are worried about someone or you need help yourself.

There is also lots of support for people who are struggling with bereavement through suicide. Below are lots of services, helplines, groups and books that offer lots of help and advice:

HELPLINES

ORGANIZATION

SERVICE

 

TIME

TELEPHONE

CPFT

1st Response

Supports people experiencing a mental health crisis. Mental health care, advice, support and treatment.

24-hour access,

7 days a week

365 days a year

Call 111

Select:Option 2

Lifeline

Free, confidential and anonymous telephone; provides listening support and information to someone experiencing mental distress or for people who are supporting someone in distress.

7.00pm – 11.00pm

365 days of the year

FREEPHONE

0808 808 2121

Samaritans

Offer a safe place for you to talk any time you like, in your own way – about whatever’s getting to you. You don’t have to be suicidal.

10:30am - 10:00pm

 

FREEPHONE

116 123

 

Winston’s Wish

For children. Giving hope to grieving children. With the right support at the right time, a child can face the future with confidence and hope.

Mon – Fri 9am -5pm

Except bank holidays

FREEPHONE

08088 020 021

Childline

Helpline

For children and young people in the UK.

You can talk to us about anything. No problem is too big or too small.  However you choose to contact us, you're in control. It’s confidential and you don’t have to give your name if you don’t want to. The number won't show up on your phone bill.

24 hours per day

everyday

FREEPHONE

0800 1111

Papyrus

HOPE Line UK

For children, teenagers and young people up to 35. National Confidential Helpline.  If you are a young person at risk of suicide or are worried about a young person at risk of suicide

 

Mon-Fri 10 – 10

W/E 2:pm - 10pm

Bank Holidays

2pm - 5pm

FREEPHONE

0800 068 41 41

 

 

CALM

For men. The Campaign Against Living Miserably (CALM) is dedicated to preventing male suicide, the single biggest killer of men under 45 in the UK.

5pm – Midnight

365 Days per year

FREEPHONE

Nationwide

0800 58 58 58

London

0808 802 5858

Support Line

For everyone. Provides emotional support and details of support groups, helplines, agencies and counsellors throughout the UK

 

Helpline:

01708 765200

Cruse

National Helpline

Staffed by trained bereavement volunteers, who offer emotional support to anyone affected by bereavement.  To help you talk things through, or signpost you to your local Cruse service and other sources of information.

Monday-Friday   9.30-5pm (excluding bank holidays) Tues, Wed &Thursday 9.30am  – 8pm

FREEPHONE

0808 808 1677‚Äč

Maytree

A sanctuary, supporting people in suicidal crisis in a non-medical setting. Free 4-night/5-day stay, and the opportunity to be befriended and heard in complete confidence, without judgement and with compassion.

24 hours a day, 365 days a year.

020 7263 7070

LOCAL GROUPS

 

ORGANIZATION

 

SERVICE

TIME

TELEPHONE

Lifecraft

Suicide Bereavement Support Service. Contact point for family and friends for support and information on bereavement by suicide.

Email: Fiona@lifecraft.org.uk

10 – 5pm

Monday to Friday

01223 566957

Mind Cambridgeshire & Peterborough

A range of services to support those recovering from mental health challenges.

Email:

enquiries@cpslmind.org.uk

Cambridge

Peterborough

St, Neots

01223 311320

01733 362990

01480 470480

Cruse

Bereavement care with a helpline to talk to someone about bereavement.

Email: cambridge@cruse.org.uk

9.30am - 1.30pm

Monday to Friday

01223 633536

NHS Cambridge & Peterborough

Foundation Trust

Suicide bereavement support group. Warm welcome assured, contact Jane Pope (07973 8835110 or Mary Hanna (07887 655713).

Email: chaplaincyteam@cpft.hns.uk

6pm – 7.30

Monday monthly

Peterborough

01733 776080

 

Compassionate Friends

Support group for parents bereaved through suicide.

Email: p.wilson34@ntlworld.com

7.30 – 9.30 Cambridge 1st Tues of each month

Rosemary Wilson

 

WEB SITES

 

ORGANIZATION

SERVICE

 

 

Hub of Hope

A place to go to for those who are struggling, to locate the nearest service available to you, as well as national organisations. A web based app makes it as easy as possible for people to find help and support around them.  Simply enter the post code and search.

Support After Suicide

For everyone. We are a network of organisations who support people who are affected by suicide.

 

If U Care Share

IUCSF offers the opportunity to speak to other people who have life experience around suicide. We offer 1 to 1 practical and emotional support. We are also available to offer practical advice on the procedures that take place when there is a death by suicide. Helpline: 0191 387 5661

 

Bereavement UK

We aim to provide you with bereavement support and information when you need it the site is available at your fingertips.

 

Students Against Depression

Students Against Depression provides you with the resources you need to find a way forward from stress, low mood, depression or suicidal thinking.

 

The Way Foundation

For men and women aged 50 or under when their partner died. It’s a peer-to-peer support group run by a network of volunteers who have been bereaved at a young age themselves

 

NHS Choices

For everyone.  It may be difficult at this time, but it's important to know you're not beyond help and you're not alone.  Many people who've had suicidal thoughts have found with support and treatment they have been able to allow the negative feelings to pass.

 

CHUMS

 

CHUMS Mental Health & Emotional Wellbeing Service for Children and Young People provides therapeutic support in a variety of ways.

 

Alliance of Hope

For Suicide Loss Survivors provides healing support for people coping with the shock, excruciating grief and complex emotions that accompany the loss of a loved one to suicide.

 

Keep Your Head

Keep Your Head brings together reliable information on mental health and wellbeing for children, young people and adults across Cambridgeshire & Peterborough.

BOOKS AND LITERATURE

AUTHOR & PUBLISHER

 

TITLE

Adele Ryan McDowell, Whiteflower Press

Making Peace with Suicide: A Book of Hope, Understanding, and Comfort 

Ann Smolin, Simon & Schuster

Healing After the Suicide of a Love One

Ann Smolin, Simon & Schuster

Healing After the Suicide of a Relative

Alison Wertheimer, Taylor & Francis Ltd

A Special Scar: The Experiences Of People Bereaved By Suicide

Carla Fine, Bantam Doubleday Dell 

No Time to Say Goodbye

Cobain & Larch, Simon & Schuster

Dying to Be Free: A Healing Guide for Families After a Suicide 

Edwin S Shneidman, Oxford University Press

Making Peace with Suicide: A Book of Hope, Understanding, and Comfort

Lukas & Seidon, Jessica Kingsley

Silent Grief: Living in the Wake of Suicide 

Myers & Fine, Jessica Kingsley

Touched by Suicide: Hope and Healing After Loss

General Grief

 

 

Boydell,K (2005), London Vermilion

Death and how to survive it.                                                                                  A practical and uplifting guide to coming to terms with the loss of your partner.

Ginsburg, GD (1997), Tuscon AZ: Fisher Books

Widow to Widow. Thoughtful, Practical ideas for Rebuilding Your life.

Munday J S (2005), Skokie IL : ACTA Publications

Overcoming Grief: Joining and Participating in a Bereavement Support Group.

Noel &Blair PA (2008), Naperville IL Sourcebooks

I  Wasn’t Ready to Say Goodbye.

Hartley Jill (2008), Morleys Print and Publishing

My True Son An anthology.

Hartley Gill. ( 2011), Morleys Print and Publishing

Aspects of Loss. A companion for Bereaved Parents and their families.

 

Who else can help me?

LOCAL SUPPORT

Skip to: Bereavement, Eating DisordersOlder People, Self Harm, Suicide, Stress, Sexual Abuse, Domestic Abuse, PTSD, Drug/Alcohol Abuse, Pregnancy, Social Isolation, Anxiety and/or Depression, Disability, Personality Disorders, Young People, LGBTQ, Victims & Witnesses, Other

 

Bereavement Services:

  • Help is at Hand  - A booklet specifically written for those bereaved by suicide by those who have also been affected by suicide.  The booklet gives practical information as well as details of further support.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                          
  • Lifecraft Suicide Bereavement Support Service - The service aims to ensure information and access to support is available to those bereaved by suicide. The service is available to family and friends in the Cambridgeshire and Peterborough area.                                                                                                                                                                       
  • Child Bereavement UK - Supports families and educates professionals when a child or baby of any age dies or is dying, or when a child is facing bereavement.                                                                                                                                                                                                 
  • Sue Ryder Thorpe Hall Hospice - The hospice’s family support team offers individual and group support pre and post bereavement. Trained staff and volunteers also facilitate the monthly walking group Wayfinders. Support for bereaved children aged six to 11 is available through the Charlie Chimp Club.                                                                                                                                                                                               
  • Arthur Rank House Hospice, Cambridge - Offers bereavement support to the families of patients who have received care from one of their services. Keith Morrison (Chaplain), Email: keith.morrison@arhc.org.uk, Tel: 01223 675777                                                                                                                                                                                               
  • Sue Ryder St John's Hospice - Offers bereavement support to families and friends of patients cared for at the hospice. Jane Maxfield, Family Support & Bereavement Co-ordinator.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                             
  • The Alan Hudson Day Treatment Centre - The Alan Hudson Day Treatment Centre based at North Cambs Hospital in Wisbech, is a day centre supporting people who are living with a life-limiting illness. They also run a support day three times a year for bereaved relatives.                                                                                                                                                                                               
  • Cambridge University Counselling Service - This free service is for enrolled students and staff of the University of Cambridge.                                                                                                                                                                                               
  • Anglia Ruskin University Counselling and Wellbeing Service - The Counselling and Wellbeing Service is available to all students at Anglia Ruskin University and offers a free and confidential service to promote mental health and wellbeing.                                                                                                                                                                                               
  • CPSL MIND – CPSL (Cambridgeshire, Peterborough and South Lincolnshire) Mind is a mental health charity that offers lots of helpful advice and services for all Mental Health Challenges.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              
  • InsightInsight Healthcare provides talking therapies nationwide, predominantly commissioned by the NHS and local authorities, as part of the IAPT (Improving Access to Psychological Therapies) programme. Currently providing 14 free-to-access talking therapy services throughout the country, we are the largest not-for-profit provider in the country. We also provide Wellbeing at Work employee assistance programmes, which enable employers to provide their staff with access to wellbeing support through a 24-hour counselling and advice helpline, a range of resources, and a web portal.                                                                                                                                                                                               
  • CruseCruse bereavement support have several local support services all over the UK. Cruse offer support, advice and information to children, young people and adults when someone dies and work to enhance society’s care of bereaved people.                                                                                                                                                                                               
  • SANDS - Sands exists to support anyone affected by the death of a baby, to improve the bereavement care received by parents and families, and to influence policy makers and promote research to reduce the number of babies dying.                                                                                                                                                                                               
  • Petals - Petals (Pregnancy Expectations Trauma and Loss Society) provides a specialised counselling service at Addenbrookes Hospital in Cambridge, Queen Charlottes and St Mary’s Hospitals in London, the John Radcliffe Hospital in Oxford, and Ipswich Hospital. Petals was set up as a charity in 2011 by a group of healthcare professionals working in maternity care, alongside women who had experienced first-hand the loss of a baby, or trauma during birth.

 

 

.

Eating Disorders Services:

  • Eating Disorder Service - Cambridgeshire & Peterborough Foundation Trust run the Eating Disorder Service locally. Most people will be seen as outpatients, with a small number requiring a hospital stay. To access support for an eating disorder, please visit your GP.                                                                                                                                                                                               
  • Personalised Eating Disorder Support (PEDS) - A specialist eating disorder charity based in Peterborough, supporting individuals locally and around the country and further afield via our Skype and email services.                                                                                                                                                                                               
  • CPFT have some services that provide support and help with eating disorders. For example:

 

.

Older People Services:

  • Alzheimer's Society - Provides a range of services for people with dementia, their families and their carers. Click here for a leaflet of their current services in Peterborough. Alzheimer’s Society also has a large range of services across Cambridgeshire and Peterborough, online there is a postcode search facility on the national website.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                             
  • Age UK - The information officers will help with all enquiries relating to older people living in Cambridgeshire.  They can provide information or signpost to the appropriate services.  Eg: safeguarding, benefits, care, finances, transport, respite, housing, aids & adaptions, bereavement, health and much more with the aim of promoting the health and wellbeing for older people, rights based advice and help you make social connections to reduce loneliness.                                                                                                                                                                                               
  • Care Network Cambridgeshire - Care Network provides help for vulnerable & older, isolated people living in Cambridgeshire - enabling them to remain independent and maintain social contact with friends and the community.  We equip, encourage and enable volunteers to support local people to lead a happy, healthy and independent life. Please note that referral is needed for practical help in the home.                                                                                                                                                                                               
  • Carers Trust Cambridgeshire - Carers Trust Cambridgeshire is a network partner of Carers Trust, providing more services and more help for family carers and their families across the county.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              
  • First Response Service - A 24-hour service for people in a mental health crisis, you can access this by dialing 111 and then choosing option 2. This service is for anyone, of any age, living in Cambridgeshire and Peterborough (for some areas like Wisbech you will need to ask for option 2 when you get through to a provider who will pass you on). The phone will be answered by a trained mental health professional who will be able to listen to your concerns and help you get the support you need. They can offer advice over the phone, put you in contact with the crisis services or even refer you to a Sanctuary - safe places run by Cambridgeshire, Peterborough and South Lincolnshire Mind (CPSL Mind).                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              
  • CPSL MIND – CPSL Mind is a mental health charity that offers lots of helpful advice and services for all Mental Health Challenges.                                                                                                                                                                                               
  • Cross Keys Homes LifelineThe LifeLine personal alarm is a fast and effective way to get help, 24 hours a day. With just the touch of a button you'll be in direct contact with our Control Centre. We can then call your contacts or the emergency services. So you'll know that help is on its way, immediately.                                                                                                                                                                                               
  • Forever Active - Forever Active provides exercise / activity sessions for the over 50 age group within Cambridgeshire. There are over 50 different sessions on offer, which cater for all ages and abilities. You’re invited to come along and try one of the classes on offer and take steps to becoming a healthier and happier you!                                                                                                                                                                                               
  • Embrace - support people over 65 in Huntingdonshire to remain independent in their own homes.                                                                                                                                                                                               
  • Centra Support – In the Fenlands - Centra Support provide a free, community support service to anyone over the age of 65 living in Fenland. The service aims to help people live more independently and maintain their accommodation. This service is provided on behalf of Cambridgeshire County Council.                                                                                                                                                                                               
  • East Cambs Older People’s Service - We provide a free, safe and dependable outreach support service for people aged 65 and over living in East Cambridgeshire. We’ll help you to live independently for as long as possible by providing confidential, emotional, financial and practical support. Our fully trained, qualified and friendly staff will visit you in your home and provide you with support on issues.                                                                                                                                                                                               

CPFT - Cambridgeshire and Peterborough NHS Foundation Trust - provide several services for elderly people:

  • Neighbourhood teams - Neighbourhood teams are the physical and mental health care hub of the local community for over 65-year olds and adults requiring community services. Services include mental health, district nursing, physiotherapy and occupational therapy. Click on the link above for more information.
  • Locality mental health services - Locality mental health services provide mental health support in the community as part of the neighbourhood teams. Click on the link above for more information.
  • Specialist services -Specialist community services include cardiac rehabilitation, CFS/ME, continence, diabetes, dietetics, multiple sclerosis, neuro-rehabilitation, Parkinson's disease, podiatry, respiratory and tuberculosis, speech and language therapy and tissue viability services. Click on the link above for more information.
  • Inpatient wards - We provide a number of mental health inpatient wards as well as physical health wards which provide rehabilitation and end of life care. Click on the link above for more information.
  • Urgent care - We provide three minor injury units in Fenland and Ely and a joint emergency team provides a two to four hour response service for people in their home when they become unwell and need urgent care. Click on the link above for more information.

 

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Self-Harm Services:

  • Centre33 - Centre 33 exists to help every young person in Cambridgeshire fulfil their potential.  We support and empower you to overcome your problems through a range of free and confidential services.                                                                                                                                                                                               
  • Samaritans - We offer a safe place for you to talk anytime you like, in your own way, about what's getting to you.

 

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Suicide Services:

  • Samaritans - Whatever you're going through, call us free any time, from any phone on 116 123. We're here round the clock, 24 hours a day, 365 days a year. If you need a response immediately, it's best to call us on the phone. This number is FREE to call. We’re there for people when they need us, which could be any time of day or night. People talk to us for as long as they like, as many times as they like. We don't rush, interrupt or push anyone out of the door. We let people lead the conversation at their own pace. There's no waiting lists, and no assessments.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                      
  • Help is at Hand  - A booklet specifically written for those bereaved by suicide by those who have also been affected by suicide. The booklet gives practical information as well as details of further support.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     
  • STOP Suicide - Is an award-winning suicide prevention campaign which reaches across Cambridgeshire and Peterborough. It started life in 2014 as one of four different NHS England-funded pilot campaigns across the East of England and is now continuing via other funding streams.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                      
  • Support After Suicide - We are a special interest group of the National Suicide Prevention Alliance who focuses on supporting those bereaved or affected by suicide.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              
  • First Response Service - A 24-hour service for people in a mental health crisis, you can access this by dialing 111 and then choosing option 2. This service is for anyone, of any age, living in Cambridgeshire and Peterborough (for some areas like Wisbech you will need to ask for option 2 when you get through to a provider who will pass you on). The phone will be answered by a trained mental health professional who will be able to listen to your concerns and help you get the support you need. They can offer advice over the phone, put you in contact with the crisis services or even refer you to a Sanctuary - safe places run by Cambridgeshire, Peterborough and South Lincolnshire Mind (CPSL Mind)..                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              
  • Lifecraft Suicide Bereavement Support Service - The service aims to ensure information and access to support is available to those bereaved by suicide. The service is available to family and friends in the Cambridgeshire and Peterborough area.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   
  • Lifeline - Lifeline is a free, confidential and anonymous telephone helpline service that is available from 7.00pm – 11.00pm 365 days of the year, you can call it on 0808 808 2121. The Line provides listening support and information to someone experiencing mental distress or if you are supporting someone in distress.

 

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Sexual and Domestic Abuse Services:

  • Choices Counselling - Choices offer a confidential counselling service in Cambridge (UK) and surrounding areas for women and men whose lives are affected by childhood sexual abuse.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    
  • Muslim Women's Network UK - The overall goal of the helpline is to provide a national specialist faith and culturally sensitive service that is confidential and non-judgmental, which offers information, support, guidance and referrals to Asian and Muslim women and girls from diverse ethnic / faith backgrounds who are suffering from or at risk of abuse or facing problems on a range of issues. The helpline also acts as an interface or conduit between the victims and services that offer a concrete response to the request for help.                                                                                                                                                                                               
  • Women's Aid - Women’s Aid is the national charity working to end domestic abuse against women and children.                                                                                                                                                                                               
  • Men's Advice Line - Help and support for male victims of domestic violence. Men's Advice Line: a confidential helpline for any man experiencing domestic violence and abuse from a partner (or ex-partner).                                                                                                                                                                                               
  • Cambridgeshire Independent Sexual Violance Advisor (ISVA Service) - ISVA offers a Professional support and advise and a counselling service to survivors. Accepts Self and Professional referrals. An Independent Sexual Violence Advisor (ISVA) is trained to look after your needs, and to ensure that you receive care and understanding. Click here for info about - who are ISVA, who are CHISVA and ISVA's Service Guide.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                       
  • Cambridge Rape Crisis Centre - Deliver a range of support services to women and children in Cambridgeshire who are survivors of rape, sexual abuse and violence.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    
  • Peterborough Rape Crisis Centre is committed to supporting and empowering female survivors of rape and sexual abuse, regardless of race, ethnicity, sexuality, age and other discriminatory factors respecting individual lifestyles through the provision of a confidential telephone help line, a face to face support service and other appropriate support mechanisms.                                                                                                                                                                                               
  • Cambridgeshire Constabulary - Being a victim of crime can affect our mental health, the Victims and Witness Hub provides a variety of information that may be of help. There is also a variety of other useful information on support available on the Cambridgeshire Constabulary website.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                       
  • Domestic Abuse and Sexual Violence Partnership - The Cambridgeshire and Peterborough Domestic Abuse and Sexual Violence Partnership is made up of key agencies in the county that have a role in preventing, and providing services and support to survivors of, Domestic Abuse and Sexual Violence.                                                                                                                                                                                               
  • The Elms - SARC - The Elms SARC offers free support and practical help to anyone in Cambridgeshire who has experienced
    sexual violence and/or sexual abuse. Our service is completely confidential and you do not have to give any personal information in order to get help.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                
  • Respect - YMCA Trinity Group - Free workshops to Schools, Colleges & Community groups raising awareness of domestic abuse in young peoples relationships.  Solution focused Counselling for young people affected by domestic abuse.  Family programmes for parents/carers who experience abusive behaviour from their child aged 10 – 17 yrs.  All services are free to access.

 

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PTSD Services:

  • Road Victims Trust - Supporting the victims of serious road collisions with emotional and practical support. Takes direct referrals from the Road Police Team or self-referral.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                          
  • Combat Stress - Charity providing free services for ex-servicemen and women with conditions such as post traumatic Stress Disorder (PTDS), depression and anxiety disorder.  Support can be residential, community based or financial.                                                                                                                                                                                               
  • InsightInsight Healthcare provides talking therapies nationwide, predominantly commissioned by the NHS and local authorities, as part of the IAPT (Improving Access to Psychological Therapies) programme. Currently providing 14 free-to-access talking therapy services throughout the country, we are the largest not-for-profit provider in the country. We also provide Wellbeing at Work employee assistance programmes, which enable employers to provide their staff with access to wellbeing support through a 24-hour counselling and advice helpline, a range of resources, and a web portal.

 

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Drug/Alcohol Abuse Services:

  • Inclusion - A free and confidential service, open to all those who feel that their alcohol use is becoming a problem. GP, Professional or Self referrals.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                          
  • Alcoholics Anonymous - Alcoholics Anonymous is a fellowship of men and women who share their experience, strength and hope with each other that they may solve their common problem and help others to recover from alcoholism. The only requirement for membership is a desire to stop drinking. There are no dues or fees for AA membership; we are self-supporting through our own contributions.                                                                                                                                                                                               
  • The SUN Network  - The Sun Network works with people who have accessed mental health and drug/alcohol abuse services to ensure that it's members opinions are heard and involved in the decision making processes that involve their wellbeing.                                                                                                                                                                                               
  • #POW#POW (Possibilities, Opportunities, Without taking risk) young people’s drug and alcohol service is a free and confidential service that works with young people and families around their, or their parent’s or carer’s substance use. We offer awareness courses on drugs and alcohol, and offer tailor made treatment to all those that are referred in to our service based on their needs or goals.                                                                                                                                                                                               
  • Apsire PeterboroughAspire is available to provide support for those with substance misuse issues and support for their families and carers within the Peterborough area. Dedicated staff offer support to the individual in achieving and sustaining recovery. Working with the service user the recovery worker will offer information, advice and guidance to develop an individual recovery plan with links to the local community. Groups and activities are also available at Aspire to assist service users in their recovery journey as well as links to mutual aid groups and longer term recovery support options. Aspire offers- one to one support, medical prescribing, and detoxification as well as structured group work, structured and peer led activities and counselling.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              
  • CASUS - Cambridgeshire Child and Adolescent Substance Use Service - CASUS provide information, support and specialist treatment in Cambridgeshire, around drug and alcohol use, to young people under 18 and their families. Our website contains information on our services, including how to refer yourself, or somebody else, and lots of information and advice around drugs, alcohol, and mental wellbeing. The service has been commissioned by Public Health England since April 2010, when CASUS was awarded the contract to work with young people, and their families, who have drug and alcohol concerns, issues or problems and live in Cambridgeshire.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 
  • Recovery Cafes : free, regular, no appointments needed, drop-in cafes where you can find lots of information on recovery from drug and alcohol use, chats with others in recovery and enjoy a free tea or coffee on us.

    Cambridge: The Edge Café, Brookfield NHS Site, Mill Rd, CB1 3DF, Every Thursday 12-3pm

    Cambridge: Frazzled Café, Marks & Spencers, Sidney St, Cambridge, CB2 3HH

    Huntingdon: Alexs Café, High Street, Huningdon, Every Wednesday 12-2pm

    Ely: The Countess Free Church, Ely, Every Monday 10am – 12pm

     

    For more information on the Cafes please call Sun Network on 01480 276057

 

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Pregnancy Services:

  • Tommy's - An organisation that provides accredited midwife-led pregnancy health information for parents-to-be, and funds research into the causes of pregnancy loss.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                
  • PANDAS - Pre And Post Natal Depression Advice and Support (PANDAS) help support and advise any parent who is experiencing a perinatal mental illness. They also inform and guide family members, carers, friends and employers as to how they can support someone who is suffering.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                             
  • SANDS - Sands exists to support anyone affected by the death of a baby, to improve the bereavement care received by parents and families, and to influence policy makers and promote research to reduce the number of babies dying.                                                                                                                                                                                               
  • Petals - Petals (Pregnancy Expectations Trauma and Loss Society) provides a specialised counselling service at Addenbrookes Hospital in Cambridge, Queen Charlottes and St Mary’s Hospitals in London, the John Radcliffe Hospital in Oxford, and Ipswich Hospital. Petals was set up as a charity in 2011 by a group of healthcare professionals working in maternity care, alongside women who had experienced first-hand the loss of a baby, or trauma during birth.                                                                                                                                                                                               
  • CPSL MIND - CPSL Mind have lots of helpful advice and information online about the different kinds of support you can get and they also run lots of workshops and courses. If you would like to self refer to Mind, We have added their Referral Form here and a link to their different services and referral forms!                                                                                                                                                                                               
  • Connecting Mums has been running in the Peterborough area since 2013 and is funded by Peterborough City Council which is also run by Mind. Connecting Mums helps pregnant women and new mums increase their social support, improve confidence and self-esteem, develop a range of coping skills, access local services and help nurture the bond between mum and baby. The course enables women to build resilience and prevent the risk of developing Postnatal Depression by providing you with one to one support and group sessions. CPSL Mind are proud to be offering Mums Matter in Peterborough, a service developed in partnership with Mind nationally and mums with lived experience. We will be able to chat to you and advise which service might be most beneficial to you. We are launching a new Mums Monthly Peer Support Group which starts in April 2018, this group is peer led by and facilitated by our amazing volunteers who have lived experience of perinatal mental health.

 

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Social Isolation Services:

  • Citizens Advice Bureau - Citizens Advice Bureau provides free and confidential advice to everyone. CAB take the time to listen to you and equip you with the information, options and support that fit your needs.                                                                                                                                                                                               
  • Asylum Aid - Asylum Aid is an independent, national charity working to secure protection for people seeking refuge in the UK from persecution and human rights abuses abroad. We provide free legal advice and representation to the most vulnerable and excluded asylum seekers.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                               
  • Wintercomfort  - Wintercomfort supports people who are homeless or at risk of losing their homes in Cambridge. They offer a safe place where people can feel welcome and valued, basic amenities such as meals, showers and laundry facilities. The also offer a range of educational and recreational activities, opportunities to access other agencies (e.g. health service), legal advice and meaningful work and volunteering opportunities through our social enterprises.                                                                                                                                                                                               
  • Red2Green - Helping people in the place they live and progress to volunteering. red2green.org                                                                                                                                                                                               
  • Workroutes - Work routes helps unemployed people find and sustain employment. The free service enables jobseekers to improve their skills and employability and create a personal plan to find the right job for them.                                                                                                                                                                                               
  • Make Do and Mend - Make Do and Mend provide workshops for people who experience mental distress. These workshops aim to promote recovery by developing self-esteem through developing skills. Workshops include areas such as candle making, guitar and cookery. There is a small membership fee to join Make Do and Mend.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   
  • Spice - Spice is a charity that has developed a system of Time Credits as a way of recognising and celebrating the time people give and encouraging more new people to get involved in volunteering. A Time Credit is ‘earned’ for an hour of volunteering and can then be ‘spent’ on an hour of something that person enjoys, such as the theatre, swimming or learning new skills.                                                                                                                                                                                               
  • Cambridge Ethnic Community Forum - CECF is an umbrella organisation for Cambridge and district that provides racial equality services to individuals and groups.  CECF provides a cultural diversity service that helps promote an understanding between people from different ethnic groups and help them be a natural part of Cambridge life. We give special social, cultural, moral and practical support to groups and develop particular projects where needed.  One of our key projects is the Cambridgeshire Human Rights and Equality Support Service (CHESS)                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                             
  • Cambridge City Customer Services - Cambridge City Customer Services provide advice relating to any issues regarding Council Tax, Housing Benefit, and Council Tax Reduction, Housing, Homelink and Tenancy Issues.                                                                                                                                                                                               
  • Richmond Fellowship (Cambridge Employment Service) - We’re a specialist employment service providing support for people recovering from mental health problems to find paid employment, voluntary work, education and training or to retain their current employment.                                                                                                                                                                                               
  • Vivacity Volunteering - Vivacity helps people get involved in making things happen in your city through volunteering. Meet like minded people and develop new skills by volunteering at Vivacity. They also offer training opportunities, career days and exhibition recruitment! Vivacity are passionate about helping people within the community through local involvement opportunities and anyone can volunteer.                                                                                                                                                                                               
  • Cambridge Community Arts (CCA) - CCA uses the creative process as a tool to empower people by tapping into their own creative resources and improving their mental well-being.  We particularly welcome learners with experience of mental ill-health. Our courses improve art-form skills, confidence and develop creative and supportive communities. We work with talented artists (musicians, producers, directors, actors, film-makers, photographers, poets, story-tellers etc.) experienced at delivering creative learning and inspiring others.                                                                                                                                                                                               
  • Positive People CareWe help & support people with mental health problems & other long term illness's, we also support carers who are helping these people. We help you by taking you out on subsidised coach trips twice a month & holidays all arranged for you 3 times a year. We also have Art & Craft sessions weekly.                                                                                                                                                                                               
  • People & Animals - People & Animals UK is a Community Interest Company providing animal and land-based therapeutic interventions, activities, education and skills development opportunities for children, young people and adults to support and enhance the physical, emotional and social well-being of individuals and the wider community.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              
  • The K9 Project - Working alongside children and young people who are in experiencing challenge preventing them from reaching their full potential. Supporting people who want to set up their own canine assisted interventions and projects through established coaching programmes, training packages, workshops and resources. Community cafes in Ely and Ramsey for people and dogs to mix.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                            
  • Fenland Volunteer Centre - There are lots of opportunities to get involved. Whatever your age, whatever your interests or abilities, your community needs you! From supporting and helping people to DIY, gardening and conservation, or office and IT skills!

 

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Anxiety, Depression and Stress Services:

  • CPSL MIND - CPSL Mind offer a range of six week, skills-based workshops and support groups which aim to help people cope with the ups and downs of life. These workshops are all free of charge and take place in our Cambridge and St Neots offices. They also offer one to one support. Click here for a referral form.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 
  • Psychological Wellbeing Service - The Psychological Wellbeing Service can offer support to those aged 17 and over via a range of brief supported self-help and talking therapy options. The service usually helps people with mild to moderate mental health issues, including depression, anxiety, post-traumatic stress, panic attacks, phobias or Obsessive Compulsive Disorder. You can self-refer to the service by calling 0300 300 0055 of or via CPFT NHS (click on self-refer psychological wellbeing service).                                                                                                                                                                                                                       
  • Kooth (11- 24 year olds) - Kooth is a confidential and anonymous online service for young people, specifically developed to make it easy and safe for young people to access mental health support as and when they need it, while removing any associated stigma. Once signed up, Kooth users have access to BACP trained counsellors available until 10pm, 365 days a year, peer-to-peer support through moderated forums, and a range of self-help materials, co-written by other young people. Any young person aged 11 – 24 with a Cambridgeshire or Peterborough postcode can access the service for free.                                                                                                                                                                                               
  • The Cogwheel Trust - The Cogwheel Trust provides counselling support for adults and young people aged 6-16 years in Cambridge and the surrounding areas. Parents can refer their child into the service which is based in Cambridge. The Cogwheel Trust is a charity and it asks for donations towards appointments based on income. To find out more visit their website or call 01223 464385.                                                                                                                                                                                               
  • Arts and Minds - Arts on Prescription is a series of friendly, weekly art workshops for people experiencing depression, stress or anxiety. Led by a professional artist and a qualified counsellor, they offer the chance to experience working with a wide range of materials and techniques, including drawing, printmaking and sculpture. Sessions last for two hours and are open to all abilities – no experience necessary. It is planned that sessions will open up to young people in 2015/16. For more information on how to be referred to the service visit the website.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                             
  • Make Do and Mend - Make Do and Mend provide workshops for people who experience mental distress. These workshops aim to promote recovery by developing self-esteem through developing skills. Workshops include areas such as candle making, guitar and cookery. There is a small membership fee to join Make Do and Mend.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                            
  • InsightInsight Healthcare provides talking therapies nationwide, predominantly commissioned by the NHS and local authorities, as part of the IAPT (Improving Access to Psychological Therapies) programme. Currently providing 14 free-to-access talking therapy services throughout the country, we are the largest not-for-profit provider in the country. We also provide Wellbeing at Work employee assistance programmes, which enable employers to provide their staff with access to wellbeing support through a 24-hour counselling and advice helpline, a range of resources, and a web portal.                                                                                                                                                                                               
  • Cameo - Cameo is an early intervention service for psychosis. The service provides support for individuals, families, carers and friends. Cameo is funded and provided by CPFT (Cambridgeshire and Peterborough NHS Foundation Trust).                                                                                                                                                                                                
  • Lifecraft - Lifecraft is a user-led organisation for adults in the Cambridge area who have experience of mental health difficulties in their lives. Services include creative activities, recovery groups, social activities and employment and volunteering opportunities. Lifecraft also have an Information Hub, a counselling service and Lifeline, a telephone helpline that runs 365 days a year, you can call on 0808 808 2121.                                                                                                                                                                                               
  • Service User Network - The SUN Network exists to ensure high quality, appropriate Mental Health and drug and alcohol services are being delivered throughout Cambridgeshire and Peterborough to meet the needs of adults.                                                                                                                                                                                               
  • Richmond Fellowship (Cambridge Employment Service) - We’re a specialist employment service providing support for people recovering from mental health problems to find paid employment, voluntary work, education and training or to retain their current employment.                                                                                                                                                                                               
  • Richmond Fellowship (Fenland Wellbeing Website) - We’re a specialist employment service providing support for people recovering from mental health problems, including Autism and Asperger's, to find paid employment, voluntary work, education and training or to retain their current employment. The Wellbeing Service works with people aged 18–64 who live in Fenland – North Cambridgeshire. The service supports people who are experiencing mental distress to the extent that it is impacting on their lives and sense of wellbeing.                                                                                                                                                                                               
  • Insight  (Peterborough and Cambridgeshire) - Insight talking therapies is a free and confidential service, commissioned by the NHS, and is available to anyone aged 17 and over and living in the Peterborough or Cambridgeshire area.                                                                                                                                                                                               
  • Illuminate - Illuminate is a registered charity, providing coaching and personal development courses throughout the East of England. Based in Cambridge we help people who have experienced a setback including mental ill health, and are unemployed or on a minimal income. Through our work we rebuild self-confidence, enabling sustainable positive changes, improving lives for the better.                                                                                                                                                                                                                   
  • Frazzled Café - Frazzled Cafe is a registered charity that operates with the purpose of providing a safe, anonymous and non-judgemental environment where people who are feeling frazzled can meet on a regular basis to talk and share their personal stories. Frazzled Cafe is for the four-in-four feeling frazzled and overwhelmed by the stresses of modern life. With the support of Marks & Spencer we are currently running fortnightly Frazzled Cafe meetings in Brighton, Cambridge, Leeds, Liverpool, London (Marble Arch, Victoria & Stratford), Newcastle, Norwich and Wolstanton in Staffordshire. Please bear in mind that these meetings are not therapy sessions. If you are currently suffering from serious mental illness it may not be appropriate to attend.                                                                                                                                                                                                        
  • MyHealth Cambridgeshire & Peterborough App - The MyHealth app provides up-to-date information about the locations and opening times of a range of health services in the area, including some mental health services. Search for ‘MyHealth Cambridgeshire & Peterborough’ in the Android or Apple app store to download.                                                                                                                                                                                               
  • Silver Cloud- Sliver cloud is an online programme run by the CPFT that is designed to help you learn techniques to overcome symptoms of low mood and anxiety. Silver Cloud is a flexible programme, that you can access anywhere, whether at home, work or elsewhere. You can use it on your computer tablet of mobile phone. You can work at your own pace, with regular reviews from your therapist who will help and guide you through the programme.                                                                                                                                                                                               
  • Head To Toe CharityWith your support, Head to Toe can help our amazing NHS staff to provide even better care and treatment, while raising public understanding of the challenges experienced by the people that CPFT serve. Every penny you give will enhance the services that CPFT provides and support people of all ages receiving mental health, community and social care across Cambridgeshire and Peterborough.                                                                                                                                                                                               

CPFT - Cambridgeshire and Peterborough NHS Foundation Trust - provide several services for people with mental health challenges:

 

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Disability Help Services:

  • National Autism Society - NAS are the leading UK charity for people with autism (including Asperger syndrome) and their families. We provide information, support and pioneering services, and campaign for a better world for people with autism.                                                                                                                                                                                               
  • Cambridgeshire Deaf Association - CDA provide services for deaf people across Cambridgeshire and we provide deafness related training.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                           
  • Family Action - Family Action - Family Hurdles Additional Needs Support - A 'Social Prescribing' project for families with a child with ASD or ADHD. Family Action is a charity commited to building stronger families by delivering innovative and effective services and support that reaches out to many of the UK's most vulnerable people.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                               
  • CamSightCam Sight is a local charity embedded in the community, working with 1,800 people living with low vision and blindness in Cambridgeshire. Cam Sight is a life-long resource for all ages. Our mission is to support local people of all ages with low vision and blindness to live the lives they choose. We aim to enhance independence, improve well-being, and increase inclusion. We bring visually impaired children and families together and support older people with sight loss to remain a valued part of their communities, ensuring they have the information, support, and technology they need to remain independent.                                                                                                                                                                                               
  • Hunts BlindHuntingdonshire Society for the Blind is an independent, local charity dedicated to supporting people with sight impairment who live in the old county of Huntingdonshire.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                           
  • Isle of Ely Society for the Blind - At Isle of Ely Society for the Blind we are dedicated to giving high levels of care, understanding and temperament to those less able to see across North East Cambridgeshire, from north Tydd St Giles and south Ely, Stretham.                                                                                                                                                                                               
  • DeafBlindUK - We support people with combined sight and hearing loss to live the lives they want. Whether you need some support to get back on your feet after a diagnosis, a helping hand to help you do the things you love, someone to turn to when you’re feeling low or some information, advice and guidance, we’re here to help.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                
  • Cambridgeshire Invisible Illness Support (CIIS) - CIIS offers friendship, community, meet up, social events and reassurance. We aim to provide a safe place to offload, discuss, learn and share experiences. We aim to work with local Physical and Mental Health Services to raise awareness of invisible illnesses and work collaboratively to strive to improve services.                                                                                                                                                                                               
  • Disability Peterborough (DIAL) - DIAL Peterborough is your local centre for free confidential and impartial information and advice, for physically disabled people, their carers and families. The purpose of DIAL Peterborough is to provide a range of services that assist people with physical disabilities to achieve their potential and have maximum choice and control over their lives.   The information and help we provide can enable anyone, living in Peterborough, with a disability gain the freedom and support they are entitled to. We hold a Legal Services Quality Mark for disability case work.                                                                                                                                                                 
  • Little Miracles - Little Miracles is a charity for families of children that have additional needs, disabilities and life limiting conditions. We can take families with children before birth till the age of 25 and can offer support to siblings and grandparents. They offer counselling (both adults and children), family support, benefits advice, play services and play therapy. It's service is free and for referrals please call on 01733 262226 or email clinicalteam@littlemiraclescharity.org.uk 

 

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Personality Disorder Services:

  • Springbank Cambridgeshire and Peterborough NHS - Springbank is a 12-bed inpatient recovery unit for women with a diagnosis of borderline personality disorder (BPD) who are struggling to cope with the demands of life outside of hospital, despite the input from community psychiatric services. Funded by CPFT.                                                                                                                                                                                               
  • Cambridgeshire and Peterborough NHS Community Team – Offer assessment and treatment advise, support, care plans and specialist interventions. Funded by CPFT.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                            
  • Rethink - Offer loads of helpful links to services and information/advice.                                                                                                                                                                                               
  • Time to Change - Offers helpful advice on where you can get help and you can see other peoples stories.                                                                                                                                                                                               
  • ELEFriends - Elefriends is a friendly, supportive online community for anyone experiencing a mental health challenge.                                                                                                                                                                                               
  • CPSL MIND – CPSL Mind is a mental health charity that offers lots of helpful advice and services. They offer PD Peer Support Groups and one to one support.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                               
  • Bipolar UK - We're the national charity dedicated to supporting individuals with the much misunderstood and devastating condition of bipolar, their families and carers. Each year we reach out to and support over 80,000 individuals through our range of services.                                                                                                                                                                                               

CPFT - Cambridgeshire and Peterborough NHS Foundation Trust - provide several services for people with personality disorders and other challenges:

 

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Young People Services: 

  • Centre 33 - Centre 33 exists to help every young person in Cambridgeshire fulfil their potential and overcome problems through a range of free and confidential services - including housing, sexual health, family problems, bullying.                                                                                                                                                                                               
  • CPSL MIND – CPSL Mind is a mental health charity that offers lots of helpful advice and services for all Mental Health Challenges.                                                                                                                                                                                               
  • Stress LESS - CPSL Mind Stress LESS is a county-wide, pilot campaign that launched across the county during National Revision Week, and peaked during Mental Health Awareness Week. The campaign seeks to empower students (aged 12–18) to find positive ways of coping with school/college and exam stress.                                                                                                                                                                                               
  • #POW#POW (Possibilities, Opportunities, Without taking risk) young people’s drug and alcohol service is a free and confidential service that works with young people and families around their, or their parent’s or carer’s substance use. We offer awareness courses on drugs and alcohol, and offer tailor made treatment to all those that are referred in to our service based on their needs or goals.                                                                                                                                                                                               
  • Respect - YMCA Trinity Group - Free workshops to Schools, Colleges & Community groups raising awareness of domestic abuse in young peoples relationships.  Solution focused Counselling for young people affected by domestic abuse.  Family programmes for parents/carers who experience abusive behaviour from their child aged 10 – 17 yrs.  All services are free to access.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                           
  • CASUS - Cambridgeshire Child and Adolescent Substance Use Service - CASUS provide information, support and specialist treatment in Cambridgeshire, around drug and alcohol use, to young people under 18 and their families. Our website contains information on our services, including how to refer yourself, or somebody else, and lots of information and advice around drugs, alcohol, and mental wellbeing. The service has been commissioned by Public Health England since April 2010, when CASUS was awarded the contract to work with young people, and their families, who have drug and alcohol concerns, issues or problems and live in Cambridgeshire.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                      
  • CHUMSCHUMS offers individual support, group work, family support, family days, activity days and residential weekends.  CHUMS ethos is to support the family as a whole wherever possible and some of our current services directly support adults.                                                                                                                                                                                                

CPFT - Cambridgeshire and Peterborough NHS Foundation Trust - provide several services for young people:

  • Peterborough Integrated Children's Health Services - We provide support, advice and health care for children, young people, carers and families.  Our services include: Health visiting, School nursing, Child and adolescent mental health services, Children's community nursing, Community paediatrics, Child Development Centre, Paediatric speech and language therapy, Paediatric occupational therapy, Paediatric physiotherapy, Paediatric psychology, Children in care and The Family Nurse Partnership. For more information please contact Dr Venkat Reddy, Clinical Lead, Peterborough Children's Health Services, on 01733 777937.
  • Community Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services (CAMHS)- We provide a wide range of community paediatric learning disability services supporting children, young people and their families, and the professionals and organisations working with them. We also provide consultation, training and advice for professionals on signs and symptoms of mental health disorders in children and adolescents. For more information please contact Dr Nick White, Associate Director of Operations, Children, Young People and Families Directorate.
  • Specialist and in-patient CAMH services - We provide a number of specialist and in-patient services for children and young people with severe and enduring mental health problems who have a need for particular interventions, focused work and in patient treatment:

With close links to the Darwin Centre for Young People, the CAMH Intensive Support Team is a community focused team offering an alternative to hospital admission for young people aged 12-18 years who are experiencing a crisis in their mental health and support for their families. The team also offers support following discharge from hospital admission.

For more information please contact Dr Nick White, Associate Director of Operations, Children, Young People and Families Directorate.

 

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LGBTQ Services:

  • Beaumont Cambridge - The Beaumont Society is a national self help body run by and for the transgender community. We welcome all transgender people and their partners, regardless of gender, sexual orientation, race, creed or colour.                                                                                                                                                                                               
  • Cambridge Diamonds - Cambridge Diamonds is a local support, self-help community group for transgender people, their family and friends.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              

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Victims & Witnesses Services:

  • The Cambridgeshire Constabulary - Provides a Hub of support and advice for victims and witnesses to help them get through the after-effects of crimes.
  • Victim Support (VS) - Give you the support you need to move forward. Our services are free, confidential and available to anyone in England and Wales, regardless of whether the crime has been reported or how long ago it happened. Choose from a number of ways to contact us.
  • GOV Website - Get free help and advice if you’ve been a victim of crime.
  • You & Co - You & Co is Victim Support’s youth programme that helps young people cope with the impact and effects of crime. You do not have to report the crime to the police to get support from us.
  • Crime Stoppers UK - an independent charity helping law enforcement to locate criminals and help solve crimes. We have an anonymous 24/7 phone number, 0800 555 111, that people can call to pass on information about crime; alternatively people can send us information anonymously via our Giving Information Form. You don't have to give your name or any of your personal details. We do not trace calls or track IP addresses.
  • SAMM - SAMM is a national UK Charity (No 1000598) supporting families bereaved by Murder and Manslaughter. We also provide advice and training to many agencies on issues relevant to the traumatically bereaved.
  • Karma Nirvana - is an award-winning British human rights charity supporting victims of honour-based abuse and forced marriage. Honour crimes are not determined by age, faith, gender or sexuality, we support and work with all victims.
  • SARI Stand Against Racism & Inequality (SARI) is a service user/community-oriented agency that provides support and advice to victims of hate, and promotes equality and good relations between people with protected characteristics as defined by law. Most SARI staff have some direct experience of dealing with hate motivated behaviour and all staff have a clear understanding of and commitment to the objectives of SARI.
  • Stone Wall - We're here to let all lesbian, gay, bi and trans people, here and abroad, know they're not alone. We believe we're stronger united, so we partner with organisations that help us create real change for the better. We have laid deep foundations across Britain - in some of our greatest institutions - so our communities can continue to find ways to flourish, and individuals can reach their full potential. We’re here to support those who can’t yet be themselves.
  • FASO - FASO is a voluntary organisation dedicated to supporting anyone affected by false allegations of abuse. False allegations affect people in all walks of life, in personal or professional contexts, and often without any warning or forewarning.  FASO is here to support you.
  • Murdered Abroad - A support group for families, partners and friends of the victims of murder and manslaughter abroad.
  • True Vision - True Vision is here to give you information about hate crime or incidents and how to report it. On this website, you can find out what hate crimes or hate incidents are, find out about the ways you can report them, report using the online form and find information about people that can help and support you if you have been a victim.
  • Equality Human Rights - We are an independent statutory body with the responsibility to encourage equality and diversity, eliminate unlawful discrimination, and protect and promote the human rights of everyone in Britain. The Commission enforces equality legislation on age, disability, gender reassignment, marriage and civil partnership, pregnancy and maternity, race, religion or belief, sex and sexual orientation – these are known as protected characteristics.
  • Hundred Families - Offer accurate information and practical advice for families bereaved by people with mental health problems along with evidence based resources for mental health professionals and others interested in serious violence by the mentally ill.
  • Support Line - SupportLine provides a confidential telephone helpline offering emotional support to any individual on any issue. The Helpline is primarily a preventative service and aims to support people before they reach the point of crisis. It is particularly aimed at those who are socially isolated, vulnerable, at risk groups and victims of any form of abuse.
  • Suzy Lamplugh - Our mission is to reduce the risk of violence and aggression through campaigning, education and support. We help and support people to stay safe from violence and aggression through the provision of free safety tips, managing the National Stalking Helpline and delivering community projects.
  • Action Fraud - Action Fraud is the UK’s national reporting centre for fraud and cyber crime where you should report fraud if you have been scammed, defrauded or experienced cyber crime.
  • British Transport Police - We police Britain’s railways, providing a service to rail operators, their staff and passengers across the country. This website provides advice, information and support to anyone who has been affected by a crime whilst on British Transport.
  • Cross Keys Homes We believe everyone has the right to be treated with respect and dignity, and to live in a community free from harassment, hatred and abuse. That's why we have a dedicated Hate Crime Officer, Emma Elmett - emma.elmett@crosskeyshomes.co.uk, who can help you report the crime and tell you where to get further support. We take a zero tolerance approach to all criminal behaviour and we work with local agencies to reduce crime and anti-social behaviour. We're part of the SaferPeterborough Partnership and work closely with local police, the fire service, Peterborough City Council and community groups to make the city a safer place for everyone.
  • Coroners Courts Support Service - The Coroners’ Courts Support Service (CCSS) is an independent voluntary organisation whose trained volunteers offer emotional support and practical help to bereaved families, witnesses and others attending an Inquest at a Coroner’s Court.

 

 

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Other Services Available:

  • The Mental Health Handbook - Lifecraft created and maintains the handbook to provide support and information for people with mental health issues, their carers and mental health professionals in Cambridgeshire. The Mental Health Handbook provides valuable information and contact details for relevant organisations on a range of areas such as advocacy, hospital services, housing, employment guidance, education, benefits advice and carers.                                                                                                                                                                                               
  • First Response Service - A 24-hour service for people in a mental health crisis, you can access this by dialing 111 and then choosing option 2. This service is for anyone, of any age, living in Cambridgeshire and Peterborough (for some areas like Wisbech you will need to ask for option 2 when you get through to a provider who will pass you on). The phone will be answered by a trained mental health professional who will be able to listen to your concerns and help you get the support you need. They can offer advice over the phone, put you in contact with the crisis services or even refer you to a Sanctuary - safe places run by Cambridgeshire, Peterborough and South Lincolnshire Mind (CPSL Mind).                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                             
  • NHS Choices and One You  - Offers a range of support and advice on a range of issues from the NHS.                                                                                                                                                                                               
  • The SUN Network  - The Sun Network works with people who have accessed mental health and drug/alcohol abuse services to ensure that it's members opinions are heard and involved in the decision making processes that involve their wellbeing.                                                                                                                                                                                               
  • Citizens Advice Bureau - Citizens Advice Bureau provides free and confidential advice to everyone. CAB take the time to listen to you and equip you with the information, options and support that fit your needs.                                                                                                                                                                                               
  • VoiceAbility - Everyone who contacts the Total Voice Advocacy Helpline can talk to us about what advocacy services are available to you. We will work hard to ensure you get information and the right support from advocates to meet your needs.                                                                                                                                                                                               
  • Self help books are also out there for you if you would prefer to go down the self help road. There is the option of getting books on prescription -Reading Well Books on Prescription helps you to understand and manage your health and wellbeing using self-help reading. The scheme is endorsed by health professionals and supported by public libraries. You can also try mood boosting books - Reading Well Mood-boosting Books is a national promotion of uplifting titles, including novels, poetry and non-fiction. The books are all recommended by readers and reading groups.                                                                                                                                                                                               
  • Riverside - We are uniquely placed to provide innovative and flexible care and support solutions that provide exceptional value to commissioning authorities, clients and communities. Provides support to tenants who may be at risk of losing tenancy due to mental health issues (Cambridge)(need referral).                                                                                                                                                                                               
  • Healthwatch Peterborough and Cambridgeshire - We are Healthwatch and we are here to help make care better.  We listen to your experiences of services and share them with those with the power to make change happen. Our Information service can help you find your way around local health and care services, including what to do if you have a complaint or a concern. This is free and confidential. Healthwatch Cambridgeshire and Healthwatch Peterborough work together as one organisation.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                               
  • Let's Get Moving Cambridgeshire - Let's Get Moving Cambridgeshire aims to improve the health of the Cambridgeshire population, specifically by increasing levels of physical activity. This will be done by promoting existing opportunities, developing new opportunities, and supporting individuals that require support to achieve their goals.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                               
  • CAMQUIT - CAMQUIT is your local Cambridgeshire stop smoking service. We focus on providing advice, information and support to local people who are thinking of stopping smoking. Whether you're a young person who's started smoking relatively recently or an adult who's been smoking since childhood, our friendly team can help you start out on the road to quitting – for good.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                               
  • Walking For Health - Everyone Health Cambridgeshire offers a range of walking groups, to suit walkers of all fitness levels. We lead walks to provide the opportunity for you to see the wide range of parks and open spaces available in Cambridgeshire.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 
  • Everyone Health - Changepoint - Changepoint is a friendly and impartial service that offers everyone free help and support for any healthy change you want to make in your life. This could be for things like getting your family fitter, doing some regular exercise, dealing with stress, kicking a habit, or simply improving your general wellbeing. Delivered by Everyone Health, funded by Cambridgeshire County Council, and supported by other partners, Changepoint is helping to improve the health and wellbeing of local communities.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 
  • Cambridge Adult Learning and Skills - We offer careers advice and guidance and a wide range of learning opportunities across Cambridgeshire. Our programme is for adults aged 19 years and over who want to learn for work or leisure. Learning as an adult is fun and rewarding but it can also have other advantages. Learners tell us that they have improved their health, relationships, confidence and independence.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                
  • ICASH (Integrated Contraception and Sexual Health Services) - iCaSH Cambridgeshire provides all aspects of sexual health, including sexually transmitted infection (STI) testing & treatment, contraception, and HIV care and treatment, available from easily accessible single locations across Cambridgeshire. Anyone can self refer to our service. The clinic is totally confidential.   
 

NATIONAL SUPPORT

Skip to: Bereavement, Eating Disorders, Self-Harm, Suicide, Stress, Older People, Sexual Violence, Domestic Violence, PTSD, Drug/Alcohol Abuse, Pregnancy, Social Isolation, Anxiety and/or Depression, Disability, Young People, LGBTQ, Carer, Self Help, Other

 

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Bereavement Services:

  • Cruse Bereavement Care - Cruse Bereavement Care is the leading national charity for bereaved people in England, Wales and Northern Ireland. We offer support, advice and information to children, young people and adults when someone dies and work to enhance society’s care of bereaved people.                                                                                                                                                                                               
  • Hope Again - Provides advice for young people after the death of someone close to them including personal stories of other young people who have been bereaved.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   
  • The Bereavement Advice Centre - Bereavement Advice Centre supports and advises people on what they need to do after a death.                                                                                                                                                                                               
  • Child Bereavement UKChild Bereavement UK supports families and educates professionals when a baby or child of any age dies or is dying, or when a child is facing bereavement.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                               
  • SANDS (Stillbirth and Neonatal Death Society) - Support for people affected by the death of a baby.                                                                                                                                                                                               
  • Child Death Helpline - A helpline for anyone affected by the death of a child of any age.                                                                                                                                                                                               
  • The Compassionate Friends - An organisation of bereaved parents, siblings and grandparents offering support and mutual understanding to others after the loss of a child, of any age, from any cause. Calls to the national telephone helpline are taken only by bereaved parents. The website includes a members’ forum for electronic communication with others similarly bereaved.                                                                                                                                                                                               
  • WAY Widowed and Young - Provides a social and support network for widows and widowers up to age of 50.                                                                                                                                                                                               
  • RoadPeace - RoadPeace is the national charity for road crash victims.                                                                                                                                                                                               
  • Survivors of Bereavement by Suicide - Survivors of Bereavement by Suicide exist to meet the needs and break the isolation experienced by those bereaved by suicide.  We are a self-help organisation and we aim to provide a safe, confidential environment in which bereaved people can share their experiences and feelings, so giving and gaining support from each other. We also strive to improve public awareness and maintain contacts with many other statutory and voluntary organisations.

                                                                                                                                                                                                  

  • Miscarriage Association - Support for people affected by miscarriage, molar pregnancy or ectopic pregnancy.                                                                                                                                                                                               
  • MINDMind is a mental health charity that offers lots of helpful advice and services for all Mental Health Challenges.                                                                                                                                                                                               
  • InsightInsight Healthcare provides talking therapies nationwide, predominantly commissioned by the NHS and local authorities, as part of the IAPT (Improving Access to Psychological Therapies) programme. Currently providing 14 free-to-access talking therapy services throughout the country, we are the largest not-for-profit provider in the country. We also provide Wellbeing at Work employee assistance programmes, which enable employers to provide their staff with access to wellbeing support through a 24-hour counselling and advice helpline, a range of resources, and a web portal.

 

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Eating Disorder Services:

  • Beat - An Eating Disorder charity and have lots of information on their website, plus helplines for young people and adults. Eating disorders include bulimia and anorexia nervosa.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                             
  • National Centre for Eating Disorders - We believe that you have the right to have good help from someone who cares and understands. We believe that therapists who work with eating disorders deserve the best professional training to empower their work, plus ongoing clinical support. This is our mission for people with anorexia, bulimia, binge and compulsive eating, body image issues, intractable weight struggles and the people who serve them. Also has training options.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                             
  • SEED - We are a group of ordinary people with first hand experience of eating disorders, who make a difference to those people whose lives are blighted by this devastating illness. All services can be accessed through self-referral. We provide support and services for people living in Hull East Riding and Out of Area.                                                                                                                                                                                               
  • MGEDT (Men Get Eating Disorders Too) - Men Get Eating Disorders Too’ is an award winning national charity dedicated to representing and supporting the needs of men with eating disorders. They provide essential information that is specific to the unique needs of men and an online space for men to get their voices heard as well as offer peer support via our forum.                                                                                                                                                                                               
  • Overeaters Anonymous - Overeaters Anonymous is a fellowship of individuals who, through shared experience, strength and hope are recovering from compulsive overeating. Welcomes everyone who wants to stop eating compulsively.                                                                                                                                                                                               
  • Weight Concern - The charity is committed to developing and researching new treatments for obesity. It is also working to increase the availability of the successful treatments it has pioneered in the UK via self-help programmes, self-help support groups and family based childhood obesity treatment.                                                                                                                                                                                               
  • Weight Wise - managed by the British Dietetic Association (BDA), with unbiased, easy-to-follow hints and tips - based on the latest evidence - to help you manage your weight for good. It will help you take a look at your current eating habits and physical activity levels, and offer a practical approach to setting your own goals for lifestyle change.                                                                                                                                                                                                                          
  • British Nutrition Foundation - Promotes the wellbeing of society through the impartial interpretation and effective dissemination of scientifically based knowledge and advice on the relationship between diet, physical activity and health.                                                                                                                                                                                               
  • Recover Your Life - One of the biggest and best Self Harm Support Communities on the Internet, offers help on a variety of topics surrounding self harm, including self injury, eating disorders, mental health issues, abuse and bullying, as well as drugs and alcohol and first aid.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                            
  • The Mix - The Mix is a website for young adults. It has advice and will help you take on any challenge you’re facing - from mental health, eating disorders to money, from homelessness to finding a job, from break-ups to drugs. Talk to them via online, social or their free confidential helpline.

 

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Self-Harm Services:

  • Harmless - Harmless is a national voluntary organisation for people who self harm, their friends, families and professionals.                                                                                                                                                                                               
  • Recover Your Life - One of the biggest and best Self Harm Support Communities on the Internet, offers help on a variety of topics surrounding self harm, including self injury, eating disorders, mental health issues, abuse and bullying, as well as drugs and alcohol and first aid.

 

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Suicide Services:

  • Samaritans - Whatever you're going through, call us free any time, from any phone on 116 123. We're here round the clock, 24 hours a day, 365 days a year. If you need a response immediately, it's best to call us on the phone. This number is FREE to call. We’re there for people when they need us, which could be any time of day or night. People talk to us for as long as they like, as many times as they like. We don't rush, interrupt or push anyone out of the door. We let people lead the conversation at their own pace. There's no waiting lists, and no assessments.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                          
  • CALM - The Campaign Against Living Miserably is a registered charity, which exists to prevent male suicide in the UK. Check out the website for further support or Click here for their helpline.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                
  • PAPYRUSWe deliver awareness and prevention training, provide confidential support and suicide intervention through HOPELineUK, campaign and influence national policy, and empower young people to lead suicide prevention activities in their own communities.                                                                                                                                                                                               
  • Zero Suicide Alliance - The alliance is ultimately concerned with improving support for people contemplating suicide by raising awareness of and promoting FREE suicide prevention training which is accessible to all. The aims of this training are to; enable people to identify when someone is presenting with suicidal thoughts/ behaviour, to be able to speak out in a supportive manner, and to empower them to signpost the individual to the correct services or support.

 

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Older People Services:

  • Dementia UK - This site offers support and helpful information about dementia and how you can get in touch for more help and info.                                                                                                                                                                                               
  • Age UK The information officers will help with all enquiries relating to older people living in the UK.  They can provide information or signpost to the appropriate services.  Eg: safeguarding, benefits, care, finances, transport, respite, housing, aids & adaptions, bereavement, health and much more with the aim of promoting the health and wellbeing for older people, rights based advice and help you make social connections to reduce loneliness.                                                                                                                                                                                               
  • Alzheimer's Society - Provides a range of services for people with dementia, their families and their carers.                                                                                                                                                                                               
  • MIND – Mind is a mental health charity that offers lots of helpful advice and services for all Mental Health Challenges.                                                                                                                                                                                               
  • MindEd For Families - MindEd for Families supports parents and those caring for children and young people in their family when they are concerned about a young person’s mental health or well-being. They also provide support for older people and their families when they are concerned about mental health and well-being, either their own or other family members.                                                                                                                                                                                               
  • Silverline - The Silver Line Helpline provides three functions to support older people by sign-posting service to link them into the many, varied services that exist around the country, a befriending service to combat loneliness and a means of empowering those who may be suffering abuse and neglect, if appropriate to transfer them to specialist services to protect them from harm.                                                                                                                                                                                               
  • Campaign to End Loneliness - The Campaign to End Loneliness offers organisations who want to tackle loneliness a chance to learn from each other. We provide the latest research, opportunities to meet through events, and regular information to share the motivation and momentum behind this issue.                                                                                                                                                                                                
  • Forever Active - Forever Active provides exercise / activity sessions for the over 50 age group within Cambridgeshire. There are over 50 different sessions on offer, which cater for all ages and abilities. You’re invited to come along and try one of the classes on offer and take steps to becoming a healthier and happier you!

 

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Sexual and Domestic Violence Services:

  • Survivors UK - Survivors UK offer individual counselling, group work and helpline services from our base in Shadwell, London E1 for men who have been victims of domestic and sexual abuse.                                                                                                                                                                                                                         
  • Women's Aid - Women’s Aid is the national charity working to end domestic abuse against women and children.                                                                                                                                                                                               
  • Victim Support - As an independent charity, we work towards a world where people affected by crime or traumatic events get the support they need and the respect they deserve. We help people feel safer and find the strength to move beyond crime. Our support is free, confidential and tailored to your needs.                                                                                                                                                                                               
  • Respect not fear - Website for young people about domestic violence.                                                                                                                                                                                               
  • The Survivors Trust - Living with the consequences of rape and sexual abuse can be devastating. At TST, we believe that all survivors are entitled to receive the best possible response to their needs whether or not they choose to report.                                                                                                                                                                                               
  • Refuge - Helpline: 0808 2000 247 (freephone 24 hour National Domestic Violence Helpline run with Women’s Aid), helpline@refuge.org.uk                                                                                                                                                                                               
  • Respect - Runs support services and programmes for people who inflict violence in relationships, including young men and women. Also runs the men's advice line, as above.Helpline: 0808 802 4040 (Mon to Fri: 9am to 5pm), info@respectphoneline.org.uk                                                                                                                                                                                               
  • The Hide Out - Women's Aid website to help young people understand domestic abuse, and how to take positive action if it's happening to them.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                           
  • The Forced Marriage Unit - Joint initiative between the Foreign Office and Home Office. It assists actual and potential victims of forced marriage, as well as professionals working in the social, educational and health sectors. Helpline: 020 7008 0151, fmu@fco.gov.uk                                                                                                                                                                                               
  • Ashiana Sheffield - Aims to help prevent murder and serious harm to black, Asian, minority ethnic and refugee women in England, Wales and Scotland as a result of domestic abuse and forced marriage and 'honor'-based violence. Also supports children and young people. Helpline: 0114 255 5740, info@ashianasheffield.org.uk                                                                                                                                                                                                                           
  • GALOP - LGBT+ anti-violence charity. If you’ve experienced hate crime, sexual violence or domestic abuse, we’re here for you. We also support lesbian, gay, bi, trans and queer people who have had problems with the police or have questions about the criminal justice system.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                      
  • Relate - Relate are a counselling service, available nationally and online. We're here to help you make the most of your couple and family relationships, past, present or future. We can help you even if you're not currently in a relationship. Our services include Relationship Counselling for individuals and couples, Family Counselling, Mediation, Children and Young People's Counselling and Sex Therapy. We also provide friendly and informal workshops for people at important stages in their relationships.

 

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PTSD Services: 

  • PTSD UK - PTSD UK is a charity which aims to educate and raise awareness of Post Traumatic Stress Disorder; it's causes, symptoms and the treatments available, to help everyone experiencing PTSD.                                                                                                                                                                                               
  • The Warriors Journey - This service focuses on helping people who are ex-forces with their ptsd. The vision of The Warrior’s Journey is that warriors and their families will live in wholeness and be equipped to navigate the issues of life.                                                                                                                                                                                               
  • InsightInsight Healthcare provides talking therapies nationwide, predominantly commissioned by the NHS and local authorities, as part of the IAPT (Improving Access to Psychological Therapies) programme. Currently providing 14 free-to-access talking therapy services throughout the country, we are the largest not-for-profit provider in the country. We also provide Wellbeing at Work employee assistance programmes, which enable employers to provide their staff with access to wellbeing support through a 24-hour counselling and advice helpline, a range of resources, and a web portal.

 

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Drug/Alcohol Abuse Services

  • Drinkline - Is the national alcohol helpline. If you're worried about your own or someone else's drinking, you can call this free helpline, in complete confidence. Call 0300 123 1110 (weekdays 9am – 8pm, weekends 11am – 4pm).                                                                                                                                                                                               
  • Narcotics Anonymous - A non-profit fellowship or society of men and women for whom drugs had become a major problem. We are recovering addicts who meet regularly to help each other stay clean. This is a program of complete abstinence from all drugs. The only requirement for membership is to stop using.                                                                                                                                                                                               
  • Al-Anon Family Groups - Offer support and understanding to the families and friends of problem drinkers, whether they're still drinking or not.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              
  • Talk to Frank - Support line for anyone with questions/concerns surrounding drugs.                                                                                                                                                                                               
  • Addaction - A UK-wide treatment agency that helps individuals, families and communities to manage the effects of drug and alcohol misuse.                                                                                                                                                                                               
  • Adfam - A national charity working with families affected by drugs and alcohol. Adfam operates an online message board and database of local support groups.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                        
  • The National Association for Children of Alcoholics (Nacoa) - Provides a free, confidential telephone and email helpline for children of alcohol-dependent parents and others concerned with their welfare. Call 0800 358 3456 for the Nacoa helpline.                                                                                                                                                                                               
  • SMART Recovery - Groups help participants decide whether they have a problem, build up their motivation to change and offer a set of proven tools and techniques to support recovery.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 
  • Recover Your Life - One of the biggest and best Self Harm Support Communities on the Internet, offers help on a variety of topics surrounding self harm, including self injury, eating disorders, mental health issues, abuse and bullying, as well as drugs and alcohol and first aid.

 

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Pregnancy Services: 

  • Tommy's - An organisation that provides accredited midwife-led pregnancy health information for parents-to-be, and funds research into the causes of pregnancy loss.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              
  • PANDAS - Pre And Post Natal Depression Advice and Support (PANDAS) help support and advise any parent who is experiencing a perinatal mental illness. They also inform and guide family members, carers, friends and employers as to how they can support someone who is suffering.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                       
  • SANDS - Sands exists to support anyone affected by the death of a baby, to improve the bereavement care received by parents and families, and to influence policy makers and promote research to reduce the number of babies dying.

 

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Social Isolation Services:

  • Citizens Advice Bureau - Citizens Advice Bureau provides free and confidential advice to everyone. CAB take the time to listen to you and equip you with the information, options and support that fit your needs.                                                                                                                                                                                               
  • Asylum Aid - Asylum Aid is an independent, national charity working to secure protection for people seeking refuge in the UK from persecution and human rights abuses abroad. We provide free legal advice and representation to the most vulnerable and excluded asylum seekers.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 
  • Workroutes - Work routes helps unemployed people find and sustain employment. The free service enables jobseekers to improve their skills and employability and create a personal plan to find the right job for them.                                                                                                                                                                                               
  • MIND – Mind is a mental health charity that offers lots of helpful advice and services for all Mental Health Challenges.                                                                                                                                                                                               
  • Richmond Fellowship - Our mission is to make recovery a reality. We work towards a society that values everyone with mental health problems.

 

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Anxiety, Depression and Stress Services:

  • MIND – Mind is a mental health charity that offers lots of helpful advice and services for all Mental Health Challenges.                                                                                                                                                                                               
  • Big White Wall - An online support and recovery service for people aged 16 and over who are stressed, anxious, low or not coping. Big White Wall enables members to support and help each other and share what’s troubling them in a safe and anonymous environment. There is also guidance from trained professionals, who are online 24/7. There is a charge for this service.                                                                                                                                                                                               
  • Bipolar UK - Are the national charity dedicated to supporting individuals with the much misunderstood and devastating condition of bipolar, their families and carers. Their work includes youth support groups.                                                                                                                                                                                                
  • Samaritans - Provide a safe place for you to talk. They will listen and try to understand what you’re going through and help you make your own decisions that are right for you. You can get in contact with them via telephone (116 123 [free 24 hour helpline]), email, letter or face-to- face.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                
  • Anxiety UK - Established to promote the relief and rehabilitation of persons suffering from agoraphobia and associated anxiety disorders, phobias and conditions, in particular, but not exclusively, by raising awareness in such topics.                                                                                                                                                                                               
  • No Panic - No Panic is a registered charity which helps people who suffer from Panic Attacks, Phobias, Obsessive Compulsive Disorders and other related anxiety disorders including those people who are trying to give up Tranquillizers.                                                                                                                                                                                               
  • Richmond Fellowship - Our mission is to make recovery a reality. We work towards a society that values everyone with mental health problems.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                      
  • Rethink - We provide expert, accredited advice and information to everyone affected by mental health problems. When mental illness first hits you or your family, it can be hard to know who or what to trust. We give people clear, relevant information on everything from treatment and care to benefits and employment rights.                                                                                                                                                                                               
  • SANE - SANE offers emotional support and information to anyone affected by mental health problems through our helpline and our online Support Forum where people share their feelings and experiences.                                                                                                                                                                                               
  • Royal College of Psychiatrists - The College aims to improve the outcomes of people with mental illness, and the mental health of individuals, their families and communities.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    
  • InsightInsight Healthcare provides talking therapies nationwide, predominantly commissioned by the NHS and local authorities, as part of the IAPT (Improving Access to Psychological Therapies) programme. Currently providing 14 free-to-access talking therapy services throughout the country, we are the largest not-for-profit provider in the country. We also provide Wellbeing at Work employee assistance programmes, which enable employers to provide their staff with access to wellbeing support through a 24-hour counselling and advice helpline, a range of resources, and a web portal.                                                                                                                                                                                               
  • Sheffield Flourish - Rooted in Sheffield and owned by the community, Sheffield Flourish aim to involve people who live with mental health conditions in everything we do. We help people to share their stories by publishing them on our website. We offer a wide range of activities suitable for people living with mental health conditions. We organise fun and interesting monthly community events based on different themes. We even help people to realise their enterprising ideas.                                                                                                                                                                                                  
  • Living Life To The Full - Living Life to the Full teaches a range of life skills that are based on the tried and trusted CBT approach, to aim to improve wellbeing and resilience as you go through the journey of life. However you’re feeling, Living Life to the Full aims to help provide useful information and resources that can act as tools to use on your own life journey. Free online courses covering low mood, stress and resiliency. Work out why you feel as you do, how to tackle problems, build confidence, get going again, feel happier, stay calm, tackle upsetting thinking and more. Our courses are free for individuals using them in their own lives.

 

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Disability Services:

  • National Autism Society - NAS are the leading UK charity for people with autism (including Asperger syndrome) and their families. We provide information, support and pioneering services, and campaign for a better world for people with autism.

 

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Young People Services:

  • Keep Your Head For Young People and Children - This website is a central point for information on children and young people’s mental health and wellbeing in Cambridgeshire and Peterborough. This site signposts you to important online information and local services on mental health and wellbeing for young people. It’s for children, young people, parents, carers, teachers and other professionals.                                                                                                                                                                                               
  • Young MindsA fantastic resource that has sections for young people, parents and professionals. There is lots of information on all aspects of young people's mental health. There is also confidential online and telephone support (0808 8025544), including information and advice, to any adult worried about the emotional problems, behaviour or mental health of a child or young person up to the age of 25. The helpline is open 9am-4:30pm.                                                                                                                                                                                                    
  • MIND – Mind is a mental health charity that offers lots of helpful advice and services for all Mental Health Challenges.                                                                                                                                                                                               
  • Blue Smile - Blue Smile is a new Cambridgeshire children’s charity that provides counselling and therapy for pupils in schools between the ages of 3 and 13 during a critical window of opportunity for change. We provide the kind of specialist support in schools which gives a vulnerable child the expert and consistent care they need. We call on highly trained paid and voluntary professionals to do this work and use school premises free of charge, so it is both a highly skilled and cost-effective intervention.                                                                                                                                                                                                
  • Relate - Relate are a counselling service, available nationally and online. We're here to help you make the most of your couple and family relationships, past, present or future. We can help you even if you're not currently in a relationship. Our services include Relationship Counselling for individuals and couples, Family Counselling, Mediation, Children and Young People's Counselling and Sex Therapy. We also provide friendly and informal workshops for people at important stages in their relationships.

 

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LGBTQ Services:

  • Turn2Me - This is a website that helps people get help, lets people know that they are not alone and facilitates a safe online community space that allows people to open up and reach out for help.                                                                                                                                                                                                                    
  • EmptyClosets - Empty Closets is a place where you can figure out who you are, surrounded by other people just like you. Whether you're gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender, curious, unsure or a friend of someone who is, Empty Closets will help you find the answer. We welcome new members of all ages from 13 upwards.                                                                                                                                                                                                                              
  • GALOP - LGBT+ anti-violence charity. If you’ve experienced hate crime, sexual violence or domestic abuse, we’re here for you. We also support lesbian, gay, bi, trans and queer people who have had problems with the police or have questions about the criminal justice system.                                                                                                                                                                                               
  • MIND - Work with LGBTQ+ communities, has personal experiences of LGBTQ+ people with lived experience of mental health issues, and have a Mindline Trans+ helpline.

 

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Carer Support Services:

  • Carers Direct Helpline  - If you are a carer, the helpline advisers can give you information to help make decisions about your personal support needs and the needs of the person you're looking after. This information includes assessments, benefits, direct payments, individual budgets, time off and maintaining, leaving or going back to work or education. The Carers Direct helpline doesn't however; provide personal financial, medical or legal advice and doesn't provide casework, advocacy, representation or counselling.                                                                                                                                                                                                               
  • Carers Trust - We work to improve support, services and recognition for anyone living with the challenges of caring, unpaid, for a family member or friend who is ill, frail, disabled or has mental health or addiction problems. We do this with a UK wide network of quality assured independent partners and through the provision of grants to help carers get the extra help they need to live their own lives.                                                                                                                                                                                               
  • Rethink Mental IllnessRethink Mental Illness was established by carers over 40 years ago and carers continue to play a key role at every level within our organisation. Supporting carers and giving them and those they care for a voice in every aspect of mental health provision is a key aim for us.

 

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Self Help Services: 

  • Books on Prescription - Reading Well Books on Prescription helps you to understand and manage your health and wellbeing using self-help reading. The scheme is endorsed by health professionals and supported by public libraries.
  • Mood Boosting Books - Reading Well Mood-boosting Books is a national promotion of uplifting titles, including novels, poetry and non-fiction. The books are all recommended by readers and reading groups.
  • Get Self-Help - Provides Cognitive Behavioural Therapy self-help and resources.                                                                                                               
  • Living Life To The Full - Living Life to the Full teaches a range of life skills that are based on the tried and trusted CBT approach, to aim to improve wellbeing and resilience as you go through the journey of life. However you’re feeling, Living Life to the Full aims to help provide useful information and resources that can act as tools to use on your own life journey. Free online courses covering low mood, stress and resiliency. Work out why you feel as you do, how to tackle problems, build confidence, get going again, feel happier, stay calm, tackle upsetting thinking and more. Our courses are free for individuals using them in their own lives.
  • Mood Gym - moodgym is an interactive program designed to help you: moodgym is based on Cognitive Behaviour Therapy and Interpersonal Therapy which have been shown to be successful in preventing and treating depression and anxiety. Identify whether you are having problems with emotions like anxiety and depression and learn skills that can help you cope with these emotions.

 

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Other Services:

  • NHS Choices and One You - Offers a range of support and advice on a range of issues from the NHS. 

CARER SUPPORT

What are care and support services?

Care and support services, also known as social care services, help people who are in need of practical support due to illness, disability, old age or a low income. 

Care and support services could include having a personal assistant to help you around the home, structural changes to help you move around or manage in your house, or even an alarm system so that you can call for help if you have a fall.

Social care services are available to everyone, regardless of their background.

However, social care is subject to rules about your needs and ability. Services can also support the families or carers of people who receive social care.

If you are looking after an ill, disabled or frail elderly relative or friend, you should recognise yourself as a carer. Carers can get a range of support from social care, and can be vital for helping arrange social care support for the person they care for. There are charities that support particular groups of carers, including sibling carers and young carers.

If you want to talk to someone about how to get support as a carer, you can call the Carers Direct helpline on 0300 123 1053.

What benefits can carers get?

Knowing what benefits you and the person you care for are entitled to can make a real difference.

For example, you might be able to get a break from caring, or get help with pay for certain costs, or make a difference to your pension entitlements in the future.

There are three main types of benefits:

  • Benefits if you're not in paid employment – "earnings replacement benefits".
  • Benefits that help pay for extra costs, such as those relating to disability or having a child.
  • Benefits and tax credits that top up low income if you're in work – "means-tested benefits"

Carer's Allowance, an earnings replacement benefit, is the main benefit for carers. You may be eligible if you are looking after someone for 35 hours a week or more.

For more information on what benefits you can get as a carer click the link below:

https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/social-care-and-support/benefits-for-carers/

Services you can get in contact with for support:

If you are a carer, the helpline advisers can give you information to help make decisions about your personal support needs and the needs of the person you're looking after.

This information includes assessments, benefits, direct payments, individual budgets, time off and maintaining, leaving or going back to work or education. The Carers Direct helpline doesn't however; provide personal financial, medical or legal advice and doesn't provide casework, advocacy, representation or counselling.

We work to improve support, services and recognition for anyone living with the challenges of caring, unpaid, for a family member or friend who is ill, frail, disabled or has mental health or addiction problems.

We do this with a UK wide network of quality assured independent partners and through the provision of grants to help carers get the extra help they need to live their own lives.

Rethink Mental Illness was established by carers over 40 years ago and carers continue to play a key role at every level within our organisation. Supporting carers and giving them and those they care for a voice in every aspect of mental health provision is a key aim for us.

We provide services in the heart of local communities, in the comfort of people’s own homes, and specialist care and support services. Our professional, caring employees and volunteers deliver our services with dignity, respect and compassion, focusing on outcomes that help the people we support have the freedom to enjoy an everyday life.

Helping Cambridgeshire parents who have children with additional needs and disabilities. Pinpoint Cambridgeshire is run for parents – by parents. We give help and information to parent carers of children and young people aged 0-25 with additional needs and disabilities, and give parent carers opportunities to have a say and get involved in improving local services.

Young people in caring roles who would like advice or support can contact one of the following agencies:

  • Centre 33 – Young Carers Project Cambridge City

Centre 33 offers support to Young Carers across Cambridgeshire for information and referrals please visit Centre 33 or contact: Kate Rees  Tel: 01223 307488  E-mail: youngcarers@centre33.org.uk

  • Ormiston Trust Young Carers Project Fenland

Tel: 01945 463337  E-mail: joy.stoner@ormiston.org  please visit Ormiston Trust

  • Cambridgeshire County Council Young Carer support

Please visit the Young Carers page on the County Council website for the most up to date information

For a Young Carers Needs Assessment email youngcarers@cambridgeshire.gov.uk

HELPLINES

We know that it's not always possible to get to services that are available to help you with your mental health challenges, and sometimes you just need to talk to someone. Here a list of helplines and the times they are open to have a chat.

 

  • Samaritans: Call for all mental health and suicidal thoughts, 24hrs a day, 365 days a year - 116 123

 

  • First Response Service: Call NHS 111 Option 2 if you're in crisis.

 

  • Anxiety UK: Call for help with anxiety challenges, available Mon-Fri between 9.30am-5.30pm - 03444 775 774 

 

  • Lifeline - Call everyday, 365 days a year 7pm-11pm for listening support and information to someone experiencing mental distress or if you are supporting someone in distress - 0808 808 2121

 

  • Gypsy/Traveller Depression Suicidal helpline: Call, Text or WhatsApp - 0739365135

 

  • No Panic: Call everyday for help and support for sufferers of panic attacks and OCD, 10am-10pm (charge 5p a minute + your access charge) - 0844 967 4848
 
 

 

  • No Panic Youth: (For 13-20 year olds) Call Mon, Tues, Wed and Fri 3pm-6pm; Thurs and Sat 6pm-8pm for help and support for sufferers of panic attacks and OCD - 0330 606 1174

 

  • Mind Infoline: Call or text for help with all mental health challenges, Mon-Fri 9am-6pm - 0300 123 3393

 

  • Mind Blue Light Infoline: Call or text (text on 84999) for support for emergency services staff, Mon-Fri 9am-6pm - 0300 303 5999

 

  • Men's Health Forum: Call or text for support for men, 24hrs a day - 020 7922 7908

 

  • OCD Action: Call for support for living with OCD, Mon-Fri 9.30am-5pm - 0845 390 6232

 

  • OCD UK: Call for support for living with OCD, Mon-Fri 9am-5pm - 0845 120 3778

 

  • PAPYRUS HOPEline UK: (young suicide prevention society) Call Mon-Fri 10am-5pm and 7pm-10pm, Sat-Sun 2-5pm - 0800 068 4141

 

  • Rethink Mental Illness: Call for support and advice on mental health, Mon-Fri 9.30am-4pm - 0300 5000 927

 

  • SANE: Call everyday for emotional support, information and guidance for people affected by mental challenges, their families and carers, 4.40-10.30pm - 0300 304 7000

 

  • YoungMinds: Call for information and advice on child and adolescent mental health, Mon-Fri 9.30am-4pm - 0808 802 5544

 

  • NSPCC Childline: Call 24hrs a day - 0800 1111

 

  • NSPCC for Adults concerned about a child: Call 24hrs a day - 0808 800 5000

 

  •  Refuge: Call for advice on dealing with domestic abuse, 24hrs a day - 0808 2000 247

 

  • Alcoholics Anonymous: Call 24hrs a day - 0845 769 7555

 

  • Narcotics Anonymous: Call daily until midnight - 0300 999 1212

 

  • Alzheimer's Society: Call for advice and information on dementia, Mon-Fri 9am-5pm, weekends 10am-4pm - 0300 222 1122

 

  • Cruse Bereavement Care: Call Mon-Fri 9am-5pm - 0844 477 9400

 

  • Rape Crisis: (to find your local services) Call daily 12-2.30pm and 7-9.30pm - 0808 802 9999

 

  • Victim Support: Call Mon-Fri 8pm-8am and weekends Sat-Mon 5pm-8am - 0808 168 9111

 

  • Beat (Adults): Call for eating disorder support - 0808 801 0677

 

  • Beat (Student Line): Call for eating disorder support - 0808 801 0811

 

  • Beat (Under 18's): Call for eating disorder support - 0808 801 0711

 

  • Mencap: Call for support for people with a learning disability, their families and carers, Mon-Fri 9am-5pm - 0808 808 1111

 

  • Family Lives: Call for advice on all aspects of parenting including dealing with bullying, Mon-Fri 9am-9pm and Sat-Sun 10am-3pm - 0808 800 2222

 

  • Bipolar UK: Call for advice and support about bipolar - 0333 323 3880

 

  • CALM: Call for help and support with mental health challenges, everyday, 395 days a year, 5pm-midnight  - 0800 58 58 58

Professionals

GPs REFERRAL OPTIONS

First Response Service: This is a 24-hour, seven-day-a-week service for people in mental health crisis who need urgent advice and support and who are registered with a GP in Cambridgeshire or Peterborough. To access the service, patients ring 111, and then press option 2. GPs can access FRS by calling 01480 416040.

If a patient, who is already receiving support from mental health services, is experiencing a mental health crisis and it is between 9am-5pm then contact the CPFT care co-ordinator. Their care plan will contain information on how to contact them.

Primary Care Mental Health Service: The Primary Care Mental Health Service provides specialist mental health support for GP surgeries so that people with mental ill-health can access prompt advice and support, receive help in a community setting and experience a more joined-up approach to their care. Anyone aged between 17-65 can access the Primary Care Mental Health Service. Any requests should go through the Primary Care Mental Health Service e-referral system. All older people’s mental health referrals should be made via eRS. Please call 01480 420178 or e-mail cpm-tr.opmhreferrals@nhs.net if you have any queries. Please talk to the Mental Health Liaison Practitioner or the Primary Care Mental Health Practitioner in your surgery if you have any queries or e-mail the team via: PrismMailbox@cpft.nhs.uk.

PRISM Leaflet

The Psychological Wellbeing Service (PWS) provides talking therapy, usually for people with mild to moderate mental health issues, including depression, anxiety, post-traumatic stress, panic attacks, phobias or Obsessive Compulsive Disorder. Patients can refer themselves to PWS by calling 0300 300 0055 or via the website.

Here you can find some information about how to refer to services for urgent and routine mental health and social care.

 

Referring to Children's Mental Health Services:

CPFT provide a range of children's community health services in Peterborough, that offer support, advice and health care for children, young people, carers and families. Our services include: 

Referring to the Peterborough Integrated Children's Health Services

(This is not an emergency service)

Child Health, Winchester Place - 01733 777937
Fax for Child Health (secure) - 01733 777938
Address: Winchester Place, 80 Thorpe Road, Peterborough PE3 6AP

Information on how to make a referral to Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services (CAMHs) services:

All referrals to Community CAMHS should be made using the referral form below.

Community CAMHS referral form - word template

Please ensure that consent is obtained from the young person/parent/carer.

The screening process within the Single Point of Access will ensure that all referrals are directed to the most appropriate services.

Please telephone to SPA if you need to discuss a potential referral.

We accept referrals from all professionals working with children and young people up to the age of 17 (or 18 if they have a learning disability) who are:

  • registered with a GP in Cambridgeshire, Huntingdon, Fenland or Peterborough

  • experiencing significant problems with their mental health

If a referral is not appropriate for Community CAMHS, we will guide referrers to information about other, more appropriate services.

If a referral is very urgent we will pass you to our on-call service at the local clinics.

More in-depth information about CAMH referrals is available here.

MENTAL HEALTH CRISIS

Who can help in a mental health crisis?NHS 111 Mental Health Crisis Picture

Call 111 and press option 2 for the First Response Service - a 24-hour service for people in a mental health crisis. This service is for anyone, of any age, living in Cambridgeshire and Peterborough*. The phone will be answered by a trained mental health professional who will be able to listen to your concerns and help you get the support you need.  They can offer advice over the phone, put you in contact with the crisis services or even refer you to a Sanctuary - safe places run by Cambridgeshire, Peterborough and South Lincolnshire Mind (CPSL Mind). The Peterborough and Cambridge Sanctuaries offer short-term practical and emotional support between 6pm and 1am, seven days a week. You can watch a tour of the Cambridge Sanctuary. Please note, to access this service you need to call 111 and press option 2 before turning up. 

Who can call?

If you aren't able to make the call yourself then anyone can call on your behalf, for example a friend, carer, loved one or even your GP. The service is available to anyone, of any age, currently living in Cambridgeshire and Peterborough in a mental health crisis.

For more information visit: http://www.cpft.nhs.uk/about-us/mental-health-crisis.htm

*People in Wisbech have not got the option 2 but can access the service via dialling 111. The call handler will then transfer them direct to the FRS (First Response Service) service.

 

TRAINING

We've put together a list of websites that can provide you with some more information about training and where you can get it.

 

Current News

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STORIES

JUNE 2018


Public Health England is collaborating with the Cambridge County Council again to raise awareness of domestic abuse during the World Cup

On the 14th June the World Cup begins. Whilst alcohol is not a reason or excuse for domestic abuse, there is evidence that domestic abuse incidents increase during large sporting events and alcohol is often involved in the incidents.

Click here to see a study about it! Here are some posters you can download (check them out below), download them here and here!

Domestic abuse footabll poster loseDomestic abuse footabll poster win

 


MAY 2018


'I was convinced my baby deserved a better mum'

At the end of maternal mental health awareness week, Alexandra Vanotti details her experience of post-natal anxiety and the help she received - which she describes as a godsend.

 Woman with post-natal anxiety

To read the full article click here.


Midlands and East (East)NHS ENGLAND LOGO

NEWS RELEASE

For immediate release

 

NHS ENGLAND PLEDGES SPECIALIST MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES FOR NEW MUMS IN CAMBRIDGESHIRE AND PETERBOROUGH

NHS England has confirmed that new and expectant mums will be able to access specialist perinatal mental health community services in every part of the country by April next year.

Locally, this will mean the establishment of a new, comprehensive service across Cambridgeshire and Peterborough, offering personalised and family-centred care.

Work to introduce this new service in the area will start straight away.

The health service is now spending £23 million nationally to roll out the second wave of community perinatal services to underserved parts of the country and is on course to achieve full geographical coverage, when as recently as 2014 it was estimated that only three per cent of the country had good access to perinatal mental health care.

This funding forms part of a package of measures, worth a total of £365m by 2021, to transform specialist perinatal services so that at least 30,000 additional women can access evidence based treatment that is closer to home and when they need it, through specialist community services and inpatient mother and baby units.

Specialist community perinatal mental health teams can offer psychiatric and psychological assessments and care for women with complex or severe mental health problems during the perinatal period. They can also provide pre-conception advice for women with a current or past severe mental illness who are planning a pregnancy.

Teams can be made up of doctors, nurses, social workers, psychologists, psychiatrists, occupational therapists, nursery nurses and administrative staff, who all work together to provide a comprehensive service to mums, depending on what their individual needs are.

Claire Murdoch, national mental health director for NHS England said: “Mental ill health doesn’t discriminate. It can happen to anyone at any time and it disrupts life not just for mums but the whole family, which is why we are absolutely committed to driving forward improvements in care and ensuring this important area of mental health continues to get the attention it deserves.

“Women with lived in experience can play a pivotal role when it comes to shaping the services for others and influencing how we plan and deliver care effectively as possible. What we are now starting to see is evidence based NHS services growing in parts of the country where there used to be limited or no provision at all. Thanks to a continuing investment in services and a concerted effort from dedicated staff up and down the country, we are making huge strides forward and sooner rather than later we will turn England’s specialist perinatal mental health map green.”

The new funding which has just been agreed, builds on £40 million previously allocated to 20 sites in 2016 to establish new or expand current specialist perinatal mental health community services – with over 7,000 mums accessing expert care and treatment so far. While some areas are taking a phased approach to the development of services, a plan for full provision has been promised by 2021.

NHS England is also pressing ahead with plans to open four new, eight-bedded mother and baby units (MBUs), throughout 2018/19, which will provide specialist care and support to mothers in parts of the country where access has historically been a problem.  A major milestone for mental health has just been reached in Devon, following the opening of an interim four bedded unit last month, in advance of a full new unit, which is already under construction, opening next year.

Justine Roberts, Mumsnet Founder and CEO: “Mumsnet's campaign for Better Postnatal Care has highlighted the breadth of perinatal mental health vulnerabilities, and has shown how many women struggle on with symptoms that make them feel miserable - or worse. Extra provision in this crucial area is so important and we hope it makes a real difference in supporting pregnant women and new mothers.”

Dr Alain Gregoire, Chair of the Maternal Mental Health Alliance said: "In over 30 years working for the NHS I have never seen any national programme produce such a rapid, effective and widespread transformation in services. These new, top quality services have led directly to life saving improvements in care for women and babies that will hugely reduce immediate and long term suffering. The new developments announced today in England look set to eliminate a long-standing and serious postcode lottery, and will undoubtedly make England the world leader in mental health care for mothers and babies."

Minister for Mental Health and Inequalities Jackie Doyle-Price said: “I am determined to give every mother and baby the best start in life. That’s why this is such a welcome announcement – we are providing £365 million to transform these services so that everyone, no matter where they live, can get specialist care if they need it.”

Professor Wendy Burn, president of the Royal College of Psychiatrists, said: “We are delighted to have been able to work closely with NHS England and HEE to help deliver the much-needed perinatal psychiatric workforce of the future.

“That 100% of the psychiatrists who completed our perinatal bursary scheme now have, or will have, perinatal consultant psychiatric jobs in their local areas is fantastic. This, together with the new wave of targeted funding, will help ensure that new and expectant mums will be able access specialist perinatal community services in every part of England by April 2019.”

Practical new guidance has also been published to help local health care systems as they put their plans into action and support community teams to deliver high quality and safe care.

The Perinatal Mental Health Care Pathways aims to improve access and quality in specialist perinatal mental health services as they become available. It sets out five new examples that promote improved patient treatment and care - depending on the mental health problem and the phase of pregnancy or the postnatal period – all of which put mums and children firmly at the centre of the plans.  Shared expertise, good practice and local delivery can all be supported through the development and expansion of the 12 clinically-led regional perinatal mental health networks across England.

One in five women will experience a mental health problem during their pregnancy and in the first year after birth, with depression and anxiety disorders being the most common. As well as being crucial to new mothers, newborns and their families, perinatal services, alongside other treatments for common mental illnesses like depression and anxiety, can play an important role in ensuring mental health is integrated into overall healthcare at the earliest possible stage of life.

Ends

 

 

About NHS England NHS England leads the National Health Service (NHS) in England – setting the priorities and direction, encouraging and informing the national debate to improve health and care. The NHS in England deals with over 1 million patients every 36 hours and employs more than 1.5 million people, putting it in the top five of the world’s largest workforces NHS England shares out more than £100 billion in funds and holds organisations to account for spending this money effectively for patients and efficiently for the tax payer. It strongly believes in health and high quality care for all, now and for future generations. For media enquiries please email england.memedia@nhs.net or call 0113 825 3437 between 9am and 5pm Monday to Friday. Out of office hours please call 07623 503 829.


APRIL 2018


Hellblade: CPFT supported PC game about psychosis wins five BAFTAs !!!

Senua is ‘courageous, dignified and determined’ says Cambridge professor

 Hellblade: PC game BAFTA Award winning

An innovative computer game which gives an insight into experiences of psychosis and which was supported by Cambridgeshire and Peterborough NHS Foundation Trust (CPFT) has received five British Academy of Film and Television Arts (BAFTA) nominations in its Games Awards.

Staff and Recovery College East students at CPFT spent three years working with Ninja Theory, the Cambridge-based company behind ‘Hellblade: Senua’s Sacrifice’. In the game the central character, Celtic warrior Senua, has mental health challenges which have been brought on by trauma. 

The game has just received the most nominations in the BAFTA 2018 Games Awards, across Artistic Achievement, Audio Achievement, Best Game, British Game, Game Beyond Entertainment, Game Innovation, Music, Narrative and Performer. The awards ceremony, hosted by Dara O’Briain, took place on Thursday 12 April at Troxy, London. 

Professor Paul Fletcher, academic lead for CPFT’s adult and specialist directorate, together with students from the Trust’s Recovery College East, acted as special advisors to Ninja Theory.

With bases in Cambridge and Peterborough, the Recovery College East offers a wide range of courses to help people develop new skills or increase their understanding of their own or other mental health challenges and their pathway to recovery. 

'Hellblade: Senua’s Sacrifice' is the first game to use state-of-the-art techniques to evoke the voices and visions experienced by people who live with psychosis. The game uses a binaural technique that mimics 3D human hearing – players experience visual and auditory hallucinations as if they are Senua and 'hear' voices just behind them, or whispering in their ear. 

Professor Paul Fletcher, who is honorary consultant with CPFT, said: ''I am delighted that Ninja Theory has won so many awards for 'Hellblade: Senua’s Sacrifice'.

“They have done something risky but important, and potentially valuable in representing experiences that most people find deeply alien. The fact that they are doing so in a first-person subjective viewpoint in a game setting, which demands that the player fully engages with the experience rather than simply passively observing it, makes it all the more powerful and has already got people on the internet and in the media talking in an engaged, thoughtful and respectful way about the nature of these experiences and what it must feel like to have them.

Hellblade: PC game SenuaCPFT supported PC game about psychosis wins five BAFTAs Cambirdge Professor

Paul, who is also Bernard Wolfe Professor of Health Neuroscience at the University of Cambridge and a Wellcome Trust Senior Clinical Fellow, added: “Critically, for me, the heroine, Senua, is not a weak or broken figure. She is frightened and bewildered but she is also courageous, dignified and determined and I feel that these attributes are there because of what they Ninja Theory team experienced in their extensive interactions and discussions with the people at CPFT and Recovery College.'

A total of 45 games have been recognised by BAFTA, showcasing the very best games of the past 12 months and highlighting an outstanding level of creative excellence from a broad range of UK and international development teams.

The Awards, including the nominations, are voted for by BAFTA’s global membership, comprising experienced games industry practitioners from a range of backgrounds in game development and production.

 


Storytelling can boost mental health

Cambridgeshire and Peterborough NHS Foundation Trust (CPFT) specialist clinical psychologist Dr Kate Nurser has conducted the first UK research on how storytelling can help the recovery of people who have experienced mental health challenges. Kate worked with students at CPFT’s Recovery College East on a paper which has just been published by the Mental Health Review Journal.

The students all took part in RCE’s Telling My Story course, which uses the storytelling process to help individuals to make sense of what has happened to them and celebrate who they are. While highly valued by students who have taken part in courses at Recovery Colleges across the country, qualitative research in the area has been limited to two small studies abroad.

Kate – who collaborated with colleagues from the University of East Anglia and Norfolk and Suffolk NHS Foundation Trust – hopes the paper will further the understanding of how the storytelling process can positively impact on those who use it. The findings suggest that storytelling can be a highly meaningful experience and an important part of the individual’s recovery journey. They also point to ways that UK mental health services could make more of the storytelling process. For a copy of the paper, please contact Kate.

Source: (http://www.clahrc-eoe.nihr.ac.uk/2018/04/storytelling-can-boost-mental-health/)

 

Recovery Stories - Recovery CollegeRecovery College Stories Book

Some of the Recovery College East students have been involved in the publication of this fantastic new book, Road to Recovery: Our Stories of Hope.

In the book, there are some inspirational stories describing the incredible journeys people have taken on their road to recovery. We've been truly humbled putting these stories together and we hope you can experience some of that inspiration when you read them.

You can download a copy here! There are now printed versions available for you to buy that are just £5 each. If you'd like to buy a copy, you can send a cheque for £5 payable to Recovery College East to our Peterborough address, or you can pop into either of our colleges, in Cambridge or Peterborough, to buy one. (Addresses for the college sites are at the bottom of the article) We hope you enjoy it as much as we did! 

Peterborough Recovery College East: 

Silver Birch
Gloucester Centre
Morpeth Close
Orton Longueville
Peterborough
PE2 7JU

Telephone: 01733 746660 or 01733 746662
Email: recoverycollegeeast@cpft.nhs.uk

Cambridge Recovery College: 

128-130 Tenison Road
Cambridge
CB1 2DP

Telephone: 01223 227510
Email: recoverycollegeeast@cpft.nhs.uk

 

 

 

 

About this Site

ABOUT THIS SITE

This website is a central point for information on mental health and wellbeing in Cambridgeshire and Peterborough. It can help you to find local services and get tips on ways to improve your own wellbeing, and how to look out for others.

This site has been developed through a collaboration between Cambridgeshire & Peterborough Clinical Commissioning Group, Cambridgeshire County Council, Peterborough City Council, and many voluntary sector partners including the SUN Network and Lifecraft.

Website Feedback

The content of this website will be checked regularly, but we are open to ongoing feedback and will make changes to the site as needed. Please let us know what you think of this website. Do you have any ideas on how it could be improved? Are there any links that are broken or information that is out of date?  Please be aware that there will be no response to any comments added to this form. 

If you need urgent help now see NEED HELP NOW.

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We love finding new services that can help people and we will get back to any applications within a few days.

If you would like to contact us about posters, flyers and postcards or any other enquiries please contact us at: victoria.morton@sunnetwork.org.uk

 

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