Cambridgeshire & Peterborough Children & Young People Mental Health Support

How can I help myself?

HOW I CAN HELP MYSELF FEEL GOOD & STAY HEALTHY

Check out the short films to help with your wellbeing made by the team at Centre 33 -  there's a quite a few to choose from depending on how you are feeling:  


We've added some posters from 'The Action for Happiness'  that  have ideas on taking time out, tips on being positive and happy, and ideas around mindfulness. Maybe give some a go and see how you feel. 

Action for Happiness Poster

 

self care


If you are someone who likes reading, books can help you to cope with the pressures of life, feel better about yourself and boost your confidence. In 2020 the Reading Agency launched the 'Reading Well for children booklist' to support children's mental health and wellbeing - the 33 books on the list, by authors including Michael Rosen, Tom Percival, Zanib Mian and Joseph Coelho, have been selected to help Key Stage 2 children (aged 7-11) understand and talk about their mental health and wellbeing. Check out their suggestions here: 

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The Reading Agency have also endorsed books about mental health for 13 to 18 year olds with advice and information about issues like anxiety, stress and OCD, and difficult experiences like bullying and exams. The books have all been recommended by young people and health professionals, and are available to borrow for free from public libraries - search for what's available to borrow from your local library here: Cambridge library and Peterborough Library.


rise above

Rise Above is about us all sharing our experiences, questions and challenges to get us ready for anything life throws at us. It is where you will find interesting and useful stuff from the web and beyond to get us all talking about the things that matter to us. You’ll find inspiring and useful stories, videos, games and advice. 


Youthoria banner

has lots of information for 11-19 year olds in Cambridgeshire, and the 'It's Your Choice' section presents you with stories that young people have faced and gives you the chance to decide what you would do, and advises on some good options. Different scenarios include coping with an eating disorder and dealing with depression.

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HEALTHY AND UNHEALTHY RELATIONSHIPS

This is a caring relationship:

  • Being good friends

  • Freedom to do your own thing

  • Time and space to see your friends

  • Having your own interests

  • Knowing your opinions are respected

  • Listening to each other

  • Having fun together

  • Trusting each other

  • Being able to disagree with each other

  • Being able to go at your own pace - including sexuality

  • Making decisions together

  • Being able to talk about it when you have an argument

  • Feeling safe

  • Respecting the decisions if either of you want to end the relationship

This is not a caring relationship:

  • Your boyfriend/girlfriend gets angry when you talk to someone else.

  • Your boyfriend/girlfriend is verbally aggressive or physically threatening.

  • Your boyfriend/girlfriend calls you names, puts you down, and makes you feel bad.

  • Your boyfriend/girlfriend uses force, threats, emotional blackmail, or bargains to make you do things you don’t want to do.

  • Your boyfriend/girlfriend threatens to harm any of your family, friend, pets or property.

  • Your boyfriend/girlfriend posts unpleasant or intimately revealing things about you on the internet.

If any of these things are happening to you, you may be in an abusive relationship.

Relationship abuse is not a one off event. It is a cycle and usually gets worse if nothing is done to stop it.

It is not your fault - abusers are responsible for their behaviour. If you are in an abusive relationship the best thing you can do is to end it. This may be tough and you may need help.

  • Find support from the people who care about you

  • Contact one of the local support services listed on our page here

  • Go out in groups (not alone) for a while

  • Carry a mobile phone or phone card and save phone numbers of people or organisations who can offer support

  • Carry money

  • Make sure you can always get home safely

  • Speak to an adult you trust. 


Companyare empowering all 13-24 year old girls, young women, and non-binary people with knowledge and confidence to help their friends. Through the Your Best Friend project we’ll help each other understand young people’s relationships, what happens when they become unsafe and provide you and other young people with the knowledge and confidence to help yourself or your friends. Click their logo to find out more!


disrespect nobodySafe4Me

The Disrespect NoBody campaign helps prevent young people from becoming perpetrators and victims of abusive relationships by encouraging them to re-think their views of abuse, controlling behaviour and what consent and sexting – the sending of explicit images by phone or email – means within relationships. The campaign is targeted at 12 to 18 year olds – both boys and girls – and aims to prevent them from becoming perpetrators and victims of abusive relationships. It provides information on understanding the meaning of consent, what rape is, relationship abuse, pornography and sexting, along with the signs on how to spot them, the consequences and supporting advice. There is also contact information giving access to help from trusted organisations should you be worried about yourself or somebody you know - click the logo to find out more. 


The Hide Out

Women’s Aid have created this space to help young people understand domestic abuse, and how to take positive action if it’s happening to you.


thinkuknowThinkuknow is an education programme from the National Crime Agency’s CEOP (Child Exploitation and Online Protection) Command.  Thinkuknow has been keeping children and young people safe by providing education about sexual abuse and sexual exploitation. Thinkuknow aims to ensure that everyone has access to this practical information – children, young people, their parents and carers and the professionals who work with them. Alongside the Thinkuknow website the programme provides educational resources, including films, cartoons and lesson plans, to help professionals raise young people’s awareness - click their logo to go to their website.


SEXUAL HEALTH

iCaSH Cambs logoiCaSH Peterborough logo

iCaSH (integrated Contraception and Sexual Health) service provides all aspects of sexual and reproductive health, including contraception, sexually transmitted infection (STI) and HIV testing and treatment. Just go to their website for all the information you need for their services in Cambridgeshire and Peterborough.

It's never been easier to have a routine sexual health screen; simply clickOrder your test kit today and follow the instructions and it will be delivered to your door in plain packaging. Then complete the test and pop it back freepost. However, if you can't order a kit online, please call on 0300 300 3030 and follow the options (times below).

They continue to offer booked appointments only - all 'sit and wait' and 'drop-in clinics' remain closed - so please click their logo or call 0300 300 3030 during these times:

   Telephone Line Opening Times
 Monday  09.00 - 16.00
 Tuesday  09.00 - 16.00
 Wednesday  09.00 - 16.00
 Thursday  13.30 - 16.00
 Friday  09.00 - 16.00
 Saturday  Closed
 Sunday  Closed
 Bank Holiday  Closed

We offer a range of free and confidential sexual health services (and much more!) to young people in Cambridgeshire and Peterborough. 

FREE condoms

confidential pregnancy testing 

chlamydia & gonorrhoea testing

No appointment is necessary – if you’re 25 or under, just pop in whenever we’re open - see here our for times and locations, or you can give us a call or drop us an email or text or whatsapp - just click here to see the ways to get in touch.  Sex and relationships can be hard to talk about sometimes. At Centre 33 we’re used to talking to people about all sorts of things – we’re not embarrassed by them, which hopefully makes it easier for you to talk to us. If you’re worried about what contraception to use, whether you’re ready to have sex or anything else that might be tricky or embarrassing to talk to some other people about, we’re here to listen and to help.


Logo for the c-card free condom schemeC-Card is a scheme for young people to access free condoms and lube to improve sexual health. When used correctly during sex, condoms are the only type of protection that help prevent both sexually transmitted infections (STIs) and pregnancy.

It’s easy to get free condoms and lube packs through the C-Card scheme if you’re aged between 13 and 24.

You can join the scheme to get a C-Card from many youth organisations - such as Centre 33, pharmacies and GP surgeries - click here to search, then simply use your C-Card to collect more condoms and lube packs when you run out.


 

Dhiverse are based in Cambridge providing free advice, information, and support on any general sexual health issue.

Click here for the information they have produced about general sexual health. 

They offer a range of services such as counselling for anyone, including young people age 11 and above, where issues around e.g. sexual health, HIV, sexuality, sexual identity, sexual relationships, sexual trauma, inappropriate or risky behaviours is affecting their mental health and wellbeing. Click here for more details about their counselling and emotional support service.  

Dhiverse offer a range of non-mainstream relationships and sex education (RSE) programmes that can be delivered in a non-educational setting, ‘SLIP’ is one of these programmes.  SLIP stands for ‘Sex, the Law, and the Internet & Pornography' SLIP and is an alternative and age appropriate relationships and sex education programme.

is suitable for any young person age 9 to 24 who, for whatever reason, did not engage, or is currently finding it difficult to engage, in Relationships and Sex Education (RSE) or Relationships Education (RE) in school. Click here to see their leaflet to find out more about SLIP.  If you are interested in referring yourself you can contact contact any of the Dhiverse team on 01223 508805 or email enquiries@dhiverse.org.uk  or please see their guidance for making a referral here

Dhiverse's 'ABC Programme' is an alternative, age appropriate and ability appropriate programme for anyone age 11 and older (there is no upper age limit for this programme), who has a learning difficulty (LD) or autism. For more information on the ‘ABC Programme’ please click The ABC Programme Booklet for an easy read version. And click here to find out more about what they offer. 


offers advice, guides and information on sexual health, contraception, pregnancy and relationships to young people under 25 across the UK. Click their logo or here to find out more about having a healthy sex life. 


GENDER IDENTITY

Help! I feel confused about who I am? Boy or girl or other?

If you feel confused about your gender identity, you’re not alone. Most people identify with the gender they are born with, ie male or female, boy or girl. Yet, some people experience uncomfortable feelings around their gender (gender dysphoria) and feel that their gender identity is different from the physical make up of their body.

You may feel you are a boy, a girl, or even use a different word or label but have the physical body of a different sex. This can be very upsetting and scary for some people, particularly as they go through puberty.  For some people these feelings pass, for others they don’t.

Many people who feel this way identify with the term transgender (or trans for short), which comes from the Latin ‘trans’ meaning ‘across or to cross over’. Some people identify as non-binary without considering themselves transgender, and some people adopt other labels like agender (not having a gender), bigender (having two genders) or genderfluid (having a gender that changes over time).

It can be distressing when people use words or treat you in a way that doesn’t align with how you perceive yourself to be – for instance referring to you as a boy when you feel you are a girl. These feelings of distress about the difference between your physical body and what you feel can be very upsetting, though not everyone will experience them.

Such feelings can have an impact on your emotional wellbeing or even your mental health. However, being transgender is not a mental health condition itself – it is an identity. If you do have a concern about your mental health, it’s important to talk to a trusted adult such as a parent, or your GP or a teacher who will be able to support you and help you find out more about what you are experiencing - check out where you go to talk to someone in your local area here


The Kite Trust is available to support all LGBTQ+ young people under 25 in Cambridgeshire, Peterborough and surrounding areas – this includes those who are trans, non-binary or questioning their gender. If you have questions about your sexuality or gender identity and would like to speak to someone, you can get in touch via their website. They offer individual support from a youth worker, social groups you can attend, and other events where you can get to know other LGBTQ+ young people in the area. They also offer a Parents and Carers Group for the parents and carers of trans, non-binary, and gender questioning young people. Visit www.thekitetrust.org.uk, email youthwork@thekitetrust.org.uk or call 01223 369508.


National information and support on gender identity:

The Proud Trust Logo

  •  has lots of information for young people on exploring identity - click on their logo or here. 

to contact them for a chat, find out how to do this here


 

DRUGS AND ALCOHOL

Worm's-eye View of Woman Holding Balloons

If you need support, help or advice around drugs and alcohol there are a range of local and national services available. See the following links for more information:

If you live in Cambridgeshire (not including Peterborough):

cpftCambridgeshire Child and Adolescent Substance Use Service (CASUS)  provides information, support and specialist treatment for young people under eighteen years of age, living in Cambridgeshire, to address alcohol and or drug use. Confidential information and support is also provided to the families of these young people.

Alcohol and drugs include all prescribed and over the counter medication as well as illegal substances, solvents/volatile substances, and New Psychoactive Substances. This does not include tobacco – for support with tobacco use please contact the appropriate GP or visit www.smokefree.nhs.uk

CASUS accept self-referrals. Referrals from parent/carers and professionals for individual work with young people under eighteen are also accepted with the agreement of the young person. Referrals can be made using Early Help Assessment or the CASUS referral form.

Referrals should be sent to CASUS e: casus@cpft.nhs.uk, or post to CASUS, Newtown Centre, Nursery Road, Huntingdon, PE29 3RJ.

CASUS welcomes the opportunity to discuss potential referrals prior to the completion of formal documentation. Please call the team on 01480 445316, and the duty practitioner will call you back.

For more information on CASUS and the service they offer, and how to access the service visit: http://www.cpft.nhs.uk/casus 

You can contact CASUS 9am-5pm Monday to Friday Tel:01480 445316 or e: casus@cpft.nhs.uk 

The CASUS referral form can be found HERE.


Change Grow Live - go to homepage

CGL can support you with any concerns, worries or questions you might have about:

  • Prescription medications
  • Alcohol
  • Over the counter medication use
  • Illegal/legal drugs
  • Duel Diagnosis and mental health
  • Steriod use and more

For information and advice for:

 Cambridge- see HERE 

Wisbech - see HERE

Huntington - see HERE

Peterborough HERE

  • CGL service is running, but we have shifted to telephone-based support and appointments unless there are exceptional circumstances.
  • We are still taking new referrals.

Tel: 0300 555 0101

cambridgeshirereferrals@cgl.org.uk


National information and support

FrankFRANK provides friendly confidential drugs advice. They have lots of information on their website, but also provide a live chat (2-6pm) and can be contacted by email, text or phone. The website also provides information on what to do in an emergency situation.


Nacoa

Ever worry about your parent's drinking? Drinking problems can affect the whole family, to find out what you can do and how you can speak to people that can help visit Nacoa or call their helpline (0800 358 3456). If you are a friend or professional worried about a child or young person the site also has a range of information that may be able to help.


Further national information about drugs can be found at www.knowthescore.info

 

EATING DIFFICULTIES

Food and eating challenges are a common concern for parents, which may have been made worse during the COVID-19 pandemic. Food and eating together with family and friends changed. Many children did not get the usual social experience of eating lunch with their school peers, due to being educated at home. For those children of keyworkers, who did attend school, their experience of lunch times was likely disrupted too- with a different environment, which could also cause worry, stress and anxiety.

 Appetite and attitudes to eating fluctuates for children and young people, due to a range of factors and this is normal. When a young person feels pressure, problems can start to emerge. This pressure can result in a loss of appetite, or increased appetite and eating for comfort. Food worries can be linked to how a child feels about their appearance (eg body shape and size) or feelings of self esteem and their emotions. Sometimes food can be a coping strategy, or method by which to feel in control- when things are not.  These coping strategies can spiral into more unhealthy eating patterns, for example binge eating, over exercising and restrictive practices.

 How can I spot that my child is having difficulties with food?

Eating problems vary from one child to another, but the following signs could suggest a conversation about eating is appropriate:

  • Eating unusually large quantities of food
  • Repeated weigh ins
  • Excessive exercise
  • Changes in body weight or shape
  • Restricted eating by type or amount of foods
  • Negative self image about weight/appearance
  • Avoiding eating with others
  • Failure to grow
  • Stress increases at meal times

 How can I support my child when they are finding eating a challenge?

 Make time and a safe space to listen to your child, regularly.

  • Have regular family mealtimes (low stress conversations and keeping an eye on eating behaviour changes)
  • If the eating problems continue and are impacting on how your child is coping day to day, seek health advice and support
  • Support your child to do positive activities and reduce their isolation
  • Support a structure and routine that reduces the unknown aspects of life
  • If child has other symptoms due to the weight loss speak to your GP or 111 option 2 for mental health
  • Take care of your health. Lead by example and ask for help with your own health

 Where can I get more help from? 

SLEEP

student lights

Sleep is really important for maintaining good health, both mentally and physically. During sleep many key processes happen: we digest the information and events from the previous day, our brain and body rest and re-energise ready for the next day and our immune system recuperates. Because of this, sleep is essential for functioning well and staying healthy. However, sometimes people experience sleep difficulties which can be linked to mental health problems. Struggling to fall asleep, waking up during the night or experiencing nightmares are some common problems. Insufficient sleep can increase risk of becoming ill and slows the healing of injuries, it can reduce concentration and memory recall, as well as impacting mood regulation making it more likely that people feel anxious stressed or low.

There are some simple changes that can help maintain a good sleep pattern. Developing a bedtime routine is one way to improve the quantity and quality of sleep. Things to avoid just before bed include: strenuous exercise, caffeine, large meals, and screen time. Instead, try to do gentle relaxing activities e.g. reading/meditation, taking a warm shower/bath, and enjoying a hot drink. By sticking to a bedtime routine it helps train the brain to become more relaxed and ready to sleep at night. Sticking to the same sleeping and waking hours each day is also important and avoiding taking naps during the day will positively impact your sleep pattern too.


See the great advice on sleep foundation website.


Can you see on this picture what could be stopping you from sleeping ??

 Teen sleep room

8 ways to sleep well

A good night's sleep is vital for your wellbeing and health. Sleep helps to keep your brain in tip-top shape.

Try the following tips to help:

1) Sleep-friendly bedroom

Have a bedroom that is uncluttered, dark and not too hot 

2) Get Regular

Keep regular sleeping hours, then you'll programme your brain and internal body clock into a set routine.

3) No caffeine

Try not to have caffeine after noon, this gives it chance to leave your system  before bed time

4) Get active

Regular exercise will tire you out, release tension and help you to sleep better

5) Switch off

The blue light from screens is a major sleep disruptor- switch off at least an hour before bed, this gives your brain a chance to wind down.

6) Relax

Relax before going to bed, warm bath, dim the lights,quiet music

7)

Tackle tomorrow

Write a list of things to be tackled the next day to help your brain switch off

8) And breathe....

Breathe in for four seconds, holding for four then out for four to slow your heart rate and quieten your brain activity.


Top tips on help with sleep can be found on this leaflet HERE!



Suggestions for Parents and Carers 

We suggest you take a look at this website as at the Sleep Charity they know that there are so many different factors which can affect children’s sleep and they have provided a range of resources and information:

Home - The Sleep Charity

Children - The Sleep Charity


Mental Health Foundation logoThe Mental Health Foundation has information on how to sleep better, looking at 4 key factors that affect how we sleep: Health, Environment, Attitude and Lifestyle.  

 

Also, see this Public Health Matters blog by Public Health England on Mental Health and Sleep in teenagers and the MindEd free online training on sleep in teenagers.

ONLINE SAFETY

know that how you experience social media can affect your mood. That’s why, together with O2 they've gathered information, tips and advice on how to enjoy a more positive and safe time online. If you are asking yourself questions such as what kind of social media feed do I have? How can I have a more positive time online? How can I deal with online bullying? How can I block, mute or report other accounts? How can I look after my privacy, please click here to be taken to their website. 


We also have some further information about support if you are experiencing bullying on our page here.


Dhiverse is a charity based in Cambridge that offers a range of non-mainstream relationships and sex education (RSE) programmes. SLIP stands for ‘Sex, the Law, and the Internet & Pornography' SLIP and is an alternative and age appropriate relationships and sex education programme.

is suitable for any young person age 9 to 24 who, for whatever reason, did not engage, or is currently finding it difficult to engage, in Relationships and Sex Education (RSE) or Relationships Education (RE) in school. Click here to see their leaflet to find out more about SLIP.  If you are interested in referring yourself you can contact contact any of the Dhiverse team on 01223 508805 or email enquiries@dhiverse.org.uk  or please see their guidance for making a referral here

Dhiverse's 'ABC Programme' is an alternative, age appropriate and ability appropriate programme for anyone age 11 and older (there is no upper age limit for this programme), who has a learning difficulty (LD) or autism. For more information on the ‘ABC Programme’ please click The ABC Programme Booklet for an easy read version. And click here to find out more about what they offer.

And please check out what other local support is available here.


It can be scary finding out a nude image or video of you has been shared online.

 Childlinecan help with this and also provides information about online safety. Follow this link to their website to find out how they can help get your image or video removed from the internet.


And please see w local support is available here.

online


disrespect nobodySafe4Me

The Disrespect NoBody campaign helps prevent young people from becoming perpetrators and victims of abusive relationships by encouraging them to re-think their views of abuse, controlling behaviour and what consent and sexting – the sending of explicit images by phone or email – means within relationships. The campaign is targeted at 12 to 18 year olds – both boys and girls – and aims to prevent them from becoming perpetrators and victims of abusive relationships. It provides information on understanding the meaning of consent, what rape is, relationship abuse, pornography and sexting, along with the signs on how to spot them, the consequences and supporting advice. There is also contact information giving access to help from trusted organisations should you be worried about yourself or somebody you know - click the logo to find out more. 


CEOPis a law enforcement agency and is there to help keep children and young people safe from sexual abuse and grooming online. They help thousands of children and young people every year who have been in a similar situation to you.

They are there to help and give you advice, and you can make a report directly to then if something has happened online which has made you feel unsafe, scared or worried. This might be from someone you know in real life, or someone you have only ever met online.

For further advice or to report something please see here.




BULLYING

If you are being bullied the most important thing is to tell an adult you trust about it.
This could be your parents, a teacher or a youth worker.

Bullying can be face to face or by phone, texting, whatsapp, email, letters, notes or in internet chat rooms.

What is bullying?

Bullying is when someone keeps trying to hurt or make fun of you.

Bullying is usually….

  • deliberately hurtful behaviour
  • something that is repeated over time

Bullying can be ….

  • Physical – Hitting, kicking, taking things
  • Verbal – Name calling, racist comments or jokes, threatening remarks
  • Indirect – Spreading stories about someone, ignoring someone, or getting other people to do the bullying

It may happen for a variety of reasons:

  • People may see it as just a bit of fun
  • They may not have been taught that it is wrong to bully others
  • They are unhappy at school or elsewhere
  • They have been encouraged to bully by their friends
  • They have been bullied in the past
  • Racial prejudice
Cyber bullying can be:
  • Hurtful emails or text messages
  • Picture or video clip bullying using mobile phone cameras which can make you feel embarrassed or threatened
  • Instant messaging used to bully, frighten or make fun of someone
  • Chat room bullying
How can I keep clear of cyber bullies?
  • Be careful who you give your mobile number or email address to
  • Never reply to emails that make you feel uncomfortable
  • Leave the chat room if anything makes you feel uncomfortable
  • If you have a page on a social networking site like Facebook, MSN, Myspace or Bebo make sure you understand all of the privacy and security settings and use them
What can I do if I get bullied?
  • Tell someone you trust – a parent/friend/teacher/youth worker/personal adviser
  • Write down exactly when the threatening message was sent or call made
  • Keep emails and texts as evidence
  • Contact your phone company or internet provider to find out how they can help you
Gang bullying

If you’re being bullied by a gang you need to tell an adult who can do something about it.  This could be your parents, teachers, youth workers or if the bullying is threatening your safety…..the Police

It’s often hard to get through to people in a gang so you could try getting the weakest member alone and ask why you are being bullied…..

  • Ask them how they would like being treated as badly as you are
  • Ask why they are joining in
  • Say you know that they are really not cruel underneath – appeal to their good side.
What can I do if I’m being bullied

Kidscape is a charity that aims to stop bullying. Here is some of the advice they give…

Tell a friend what is happening. Ask him or her to help you. It will be harder for the bully to pick on you if you have a friend with you for support.

Try to ignore the bullying or say ‘No’ really firmly, then turn and walk away. Remember, it’s very hard for the bully to go on bullying someone who won’t stand still and take it.

  • Try not to show you’re upset or angry. Bullies love to get a reaction. If you can keep calm and hide your emotions, they might get bored and leave you alone.
  • Don’t fight back, if you can help it. If you fight back, you could make the situation worse, get hurt or be blamed for starting the trouble.
  • If you feel threatened, give the bullies what they want. Property can be replaced – you can’t.

Try and avoid being alone in the places where you know the bully is likely to pick on you. This might mean changing your route to school, or only using the lavatories when other people are there. It’s not fair that you have to do this but it might put the bully off.

Practise ‘walking tall’ in a mirror. Bullies tend to pick on people when they are weak or timid and they often think shy, quiet people make easy targets. If you look positive and confident, the bully will find it harder to identify you as a target.

A good technique for dealing with taunts and insults is to use something called ‘fogging’. When other people make hurtful remarks, don’t argue and try not to become upset. Imagine that you are inside a huge, white fog-bank; the insults are swallowed up by the fog long before they reach you. Nothing touches you.

Reply to taunts with something short and bland; ‘That’s what you think.’ Then walk away. This might seem strange at first but it does work.

Keep a diary about what’s happening. Write down details of the incidents and your feelings. When you do decide to tell someone, a written record of the bullying makes it easier to prove what has been going on.

If you are being bullied by a gang, get the weakest member alone and ask why they are bullying you and how they would like being treated as badly as you are.

Tell your parents or other adults – you need their help. Don’t suffer in silence.

Why do some people bully?
There are lots of different reasons as to why people become bullies. They may be…
  • having family problems
  • being bullied themselves
  • being selfish or spoilt and always want to get their own way
  • having no friends and feel lonely
  • feeling bad about themselves and want to make other people feel bad too
  • taking out their own frustration on others
  • feeling insecure and unimportant – bullying gives them power
  • bullied into joining a bully gang and have gone along with things just to keep on the bully’s good side
  • not understanding how bad the people being bullied feel

Bullies use ‘differences’ e.g. ‘wearing glasses’, ‘too good at exams’ and ‘too creative’ as an excuse for their bad behaviour. It’s not the ‘difference’ in the victim that’s the problem – it’s the bullies who have the problem because they may be:

  • Afraid
  • Jealous
  • Envious
  • Cruel
  • Angry
  • Insecure
  • Unhappy


Red Balloon Learner CentresIf your experience of being bullied is affecting you at school, this organisation has a branch in Cambridge may be worth checking out - click their logo for more information:  

Red Balloon Learner Centres

Red Balloon Learner Centres supports young people who self-exclude from school and are missing education because of bullying or other trauma. We provide an academic and therapeutic programme to enable our students to get back on track and reconnect with society.


Information for Parents and Carers

It can be very distressing to find out your child is being bullied - the NSPCC have a helpful guide to keeping children safe from bullying and cyberbullying. The guide also has helpful information on what to do if your child is bullying others. There is also lots of information and resources available for teachers on preventing and addressing bullying in schools. The Anti-bullying Alliance also offers training and information for teachers.


 And check out our page on online safety here


                                       

 

 

 

 

PHOBIAS

What are Phobias?

A phobia is an overwhelming and debilitating fear of an object, place, situation, feeling or animal.

Phobias are more pronounced than fears. They develop when a person has an exaggerated or unrealistic sense of danger about a situation or object.

If a phobia becomes very severe, a person may organise their life around avoiding the thing that's causing them anxiety. As well as restricting their day-to-day life, it can also cause a lot of distress.

A phobia is a type of anxiety disorder. You may not experience any symptoms until you come into contact with the source of your phobia.

However, in some cases, even thinking about the source of a phobia can make a person feel anxious or panicky. This is known as anticipatory anxiety.

If you don't come into contact with the source of your phobia very often, it may not affect your everyday life.

There are a wide variety of objects or situations that someone could develop a phobia about. However, phobias can be divided into two main categories:

  • Specific or simple phobias
  • Complex phobias

Specific or simple phobias

Specific or simple phobias centre around a particular object, animal, situation or activity. They often develop during childhood or adolescence and may become less severe as you get older.

Common examples of simple phobias include:

  • Animal phobias – such as dogs, spiders, snakes or rodents
  • Environmental phobias – such as heights, deep water and germs
  • Situational phobias – such as visiting the dentist or flying
  • Bodily phobias – such as blood, vomit or having injections
  • Sexual phobias – such as performance anxiety or the fear of getting a sexually transmitted infection 

Complex phobias

Complex phobias tend to be more disabling than simple phobias. They tend to develop during adulthood and are often associated with a deep-rooted fear or anxiety about a particular situation or circumstance.

The two most common complex phobias are:

  • Agoraphobia
  • Social phobia 

Agoraphobia is often thought of as a fear of open spaces, but it's much more complex than this. Someone with agoraphobia will feel anxious about being in a place or situation where escaping may be difficult if they have a panic attack.

Social phobia, also known as social anxiety disorder, centres around feeling anxious in social situations. If you have a social phobia, you might be afraid of speaking in front of people for fear of embarrassing yourself and being humiliated in public. In severe cases, this can become debilitating and may prevent you from carrying out everyday activities, such as eating out or meeting friends.

How common are phobias?

Phobias are the most common type of anxiety disorder.

They can affect anyone, regardless of age, sex and social background. Some of the most common phobias include:

  • Arachnophobia – fear of spiders
  • Claustrophobia  – fear of confined spaces
  • Agoraphobia – fear of open spaces and public places
  • Social phobia  – fear of social situations

Who can help?

If you have a phobia, you should seek help from your GP. They may refer you to a specialist with expertise in behavioural therapy, such as a psychologist. Or you can refer yourself to a service that helps with Mental Health Challenges.

 

TICS AND TOURETTES

Most people with Tourette Syndrome (TS) are diagnosed as children or teenagers. Children generally start to tic between ages five and seven, but they can start as young as three years old.

Tourette Syndrome is an inherited, neurological condition, the key features of which are tics, involuntary and uncontrollable sounds and movements.

CHUMS have some good information on Tics and Tourettes it gives information on what it is and how it can be managed. There is also some useful tips for parents.

Tourettes Action

Tourettes action offers some great advice for young people .

ANGER AND AGGRESSION

Anger is the name we give to a particular form of human energy, it is an emotion that we all experience at some point. 

If you are struggling to manage anger or aggression, there is a lot of support and advice online to help you.

Mind logo

This link from Mind talks you through what anger is

The Good Life Service at CPSL Mind will be running a new 8 week workshop ‘Anger and what to do about it’ for anyone 18+ living in Cambridgeshire or Peterborough. We all feel angry at times, and this is a healthy, normal emotion that only becomes a problem when it is harming you, or people around you. If your anger may be becoming destructive our 'Anger and what to do about itworkshop can help take back control. We will explore CBT style materials, opportunities to engage peer support, a space to create your own anger management plan and tool kit and encouragement to practice these learnings outside of the sessions. 

To apply, please email goodlife@cpslmind.org.uk or call 0300 303 4363  

The first sessions will take place from the 18th May 2021 and they are aiming to offer at least 1 workshop per quarter.

Each workshop session will last 1 hour 45 minutes and will take place via Zoom.


Anger Management tips from Centre 33


Young Minds logo

There is a great page on young minds to support young people who want to manage anger issues, as well as a support page for parents who are worried about their child's anger.


 NHS choices also have great advice for parents on managing anger


Recommended reading

There are also a number of books that can be useful in understanding anger in yourself or others:

 

Managing Anger:Simple steps to dealing with frustration and threat by Gael Lindenfield ( Thorstons ,2000)

Working with Anger and Young People By Nick Luxmore (Jessica Kingsley, 2006)

Anger Management :A pratical guide for working with Children and Young People by Adrian Faupel. Elizabeth Herrick and Peter Sharp ( Routledge,2017)

 

GAMING ADDICTION

 Are you worried about yourself or someone you know who seems to spend far too much time surfing the internet or playing video games?

Gaming addiction is on the increase https://www.videogameaddiction.co.uk/  has lots of information and support for those that might be concerned and also for family and friends.

Call Now for immediate 
confidential help and advice 24/7

08000 886 686

Family Lives logo

Family Lives 

The Organisation Family Lives also has some support and information for gaming addictions.

Parent Zone also offers support on gaming addiction,screen time and other digital worries See Here

WELLBEING RESOURCES & EVENTS

You can find out more information and sign-up on their events page here- https://centre33.org.uk/events/


Centre 33 have also put together this resource about why and how we experience panic and look at ways we can face and cope with this when it happens - it includes handy in the moment tips and there's the option for you to think about putting down a plan that may help you. Plus suggestions for further support. Please view and down load it here: 

managing panic resource by Centre 33


Companyare empowering all 13-24 year old girls, young women, and non-binary people with knowledge and confidence to help their friends. Through the Your Best Friend project we’ll help each other understand young people’s relationships, what happens when they become unsafe and provide you and other young people with the knowledge and confidence to help yourself or your friends. Click their logo to find out more!


Free outdoor wellbeing activities to support 12-17 year olds

Click the logo or here for more information and the online booking form for 2022. Milton Country Park sessions are for young people ages 15 to 17. Wandlebury Country Park sessions are for young people aged 12 to 14. Sessions are an hour and a half and take place weekly, for eight weeks and are  run by skilled activity instructors and youth workers.


Taylorfitch website