Cambridgeshire & Peterborough Children & Young People Mental Health Support

Who else can help me?

SUPPORT FOR YOUNG CARERS

Do you help to look after someone in your family?

You are a young carer and we are here to help.

The Centre 33 Young Carers Project works with young carers up to their 19th birthday.

We work in schools, groups, one to one and with community groups across Cambridgeshire and Peterborough.

What is a young carer?

A young carer is a child or young person who offers practical or emotional caring support to someone with a mental or physical illness, disability, or is dependent on drugs or alcohol. They carry out significant or substantial caring tasks, taking on a level or responsibility that is inappropriate to their age or development. Are you a young carer? You are not alone! There is plenty of support out there for you.

How to get support? 

If you are under 13, you must get your parents’ consent to make the referral. If you are 13 or over, you can self-refer without your parents’ consent.

You can make a referral by:

  • Speaking to the young carers’ champions or contact at your school – click here to see which schools we support
  • By calling us on 0333 4141809; Text/WhatsApp: 07514783745; email: youngcarers@centre33.org.uk
  • fill in our referral form here
  • By speaking to a professional you are already working with, e.g. family worker, social worker, so they can refer you into the service

What support does Centre 33 offer young carers?

Depending on your needs we can help in lots of different ways including:

  • Offering you a Young Carers Needs Assessment
  • Giving you someone to talk to
  • Helping you to meet other young carers in the same situation as you
  • Supporting you with life transitions like starting a new school

Note about permission

All of Centre 33's services are confidential. That means they will not tell anyone, without your permission, that you are in contact with them or what you tell them. If you are in the young carers project then your parents or carers and sometimes your college are informed and involved unless it is not appropriate or you don’t want them to be. They can discuss this with you. 

That would only change if they thought you or someone else was at risk of serious harm. If they did have to talk to someone else to help keep you safe, they would always try to talk to you about that first. You can read about this and also how they keep your information safe here


Caring Together

If you are over 19 and a carer, Caring Together is a leading charity supporting carers of all ages across Cambridgeshire, Peterborough and Norfolk.  

We provide information and advice, run services in our local communities and campaign so that carers have choices.  

More details here

 

 

NATIONAL SUPPORT

Below are some national organisations that provide information and support on different areas of young people's mental health. There is also specific information on certain topics on the bullyingsuicide, stress and anxiety and  sleep sections of this website.

The Youth Wellbeing Directory may also be useful for finding free local and national support services. You can search by postcode/area, by name of service, or by issue or topic.


is a fantastic resource that has sections for young people, parents and professionals. There is lots of information on all aspects of young people's mental health.


Stem 4 logo

Stem4 offers lots of advice and information for teenagers with mental health conditions.


MH HubNHS Choices have a hub of information on young people's mental health which has information on when to seek support for low mood and information on specific topics such as self-harm and bipolar disorder.


 

British Association for Counselling Psychotherapy

The British Association for Counselling and Psychotherapy (BACP) provides a register of counsellors and psychotherapists accredited by the Professional Standards Authority for Health and Social Care. We recommend that you go via this website if you are interested in paying for private therapy. 


  

childline

ChildLine is a private and confidential service for children and young people up to the age of 19. It provides signposting and information and is open 24 hours.  


Royal College of Psychiatrists logo

The Royal College of Psychiatrists has series of leaflets and films for young people, parents and carers on wide variety of mental health.


rethink

Rethink Siblings project is for siblings affected by mental health issues and provides information on how you can support your sibling and look after your own wellbeing.

They also offer an information and support service for everyone affected by mental illness, ( RAIS Rethink Advice and Information Service: 0300 5000 927 open 10.00-14.00 Monday-Friday)


beat

Beat are an Eating Disorder charity and have lots of information on their website, plus helplines for young people and adults. Eating disorders include bulimia and anorexia nervosa, for more information on these conditions visit Young Minds.  

 


BWW

Big White Wall is an online support and recovery service for people aged 16 and over who are stressed, anxious, low or not coping. Big White Wall enables members to support and help each other and share what’s troubling them in a safe and anonymous environment. There is also guidance from trained professionals, who are online 24/7. There is a charge for this service. 

 

CALM - The Campaign Against Living Miserably is a registered charity, which exists to prevent male suicide in the UK. Check out the website for futher support or Click here for their helpline.

 

hope again

Hope Again is a website provides advice for young people after the death of someone close to them. The site has lots of information on how to cope when someone you care about dies, including how to talk about it, remembering, and moving on. The site also has personal stories from others who have experienced grief.

It can be helpful to talk to someone you trust if things are getting overwhelming. This might be a parent, carer or teacher. Some people find it easier to talk to someone they don’t know like someone at Cruse. To reach the Cruse Bereavement Care Youth Helpline between 9:30am and 5:00pm, call 0808 808 1677.

 

contact a family logo

Contact a Family provides information, advice and support. We bring families together so they can support each other. We campaign to improve their circumstances, and for their right to be included and equal in society.

 

 Blurt foundation logo

Blurt Foundation - Community led project dedicated to supporting those affected by Depression.

 

 bipolar Uk logo

Bipolar UK - Are the national charity dedicated to supporting individuals with the much misunderstood and devastating condition of bipolar, their families and carers. Their work includes youth support groups.  

 

student minds logo

StudentMinds - is the UK's student mental health charity. They want students to have the skills, knowledge and confidence to talk about their mental health and look out for their peers


time 4 u

The Cambridgeshire and Peterborough Prevention and Intervention Project, Time4U, offers emotional help through talking therapies. Delivered locally by national charity Embrace - Child Victims of Crime (CVOC), the project also helps young people who use violence and abuse as a result of being themselves traumatised or victims of other types of abuse. The service is available for young people aged between 13 and 19 (or up to the age of 24 if they have additional needs) who have been affected by sexual violence and regardless of their gender identity. Therapeutic support is available from their counselling service. Click here for their referral form. 

For more information visit their website: www.embracecvoc.org.uk.


 

stonewall

Stonewall - We are here to let all lesbian, gay, bi and trans people know they are not alone

 

 

To let us know of services and resources you think should be added to this site, get in touch via the feedback form and please leave your email address.

 

SUPPORT WITH LOSING A LOVED ONE ~ BEREAVEMENT

The death of a loved one can be devastating, bereavement affects people in different ways. There's no right or wrong way to feel.

Stages of bereavement or grief:

Experts generally accept there are four stages of bereavement: 

  • accepting that your loss is real
  • experiencing the pain of grief
  • adjusting to life without the person who has died 
  • putting less emotional energy into grieving and putting it into something new – in other words, moving on

You'll probably go through all these stages, but you won't necessarily move smoothly from one to the next. Your grief might feel chaotic and out of control, but these feelings will eventually become less intense.


Feelings of grief:

Give yourself time – these feelings will pass. You might feel:

  • shock and numbness – this is usually the first reaction to the death, and people often speak of being in a daze
  • overwhelming sadness, with lots of crying
  • tiredness or exhaustion
  • anger – for example, towards the person who died, their illness, or God
  • guilt – for example, guilt about feeling angry, about something you said or didn't say, or about not being able to stop your loved one dying

Coping with grief:

Talking and sharing your feelings with someone can help. Don't go through this alone. For some people, relying on family and friends is the best way to cope. 

If you don't feel you can talk to them much – perhaps you aren't close, or they're grieving, too – you can contact local bereavement services:

Coronavirus update... This digital booklet created by the Cambridgeshire and Peterborough CCG, gives updated information about local services that can provide support for people who have lost a loved one at this time. They have specific sections about services for children and young people.

 

  

Cruse Bereavement offer advice,support ( including counselling) and information for those that have lost a loved one. 

 

Stars new logo

Stars Cambridge 

Supporting Young People Facing Grief. Everyone will experience,bereavement during their life, but for young people, the death of a parent or another important person in their lives can be terrible to deal with.

Young people need time to be listened to and to speak about their fears and hopes for the future, but sometimes that’s difficult when others in the family are coping with their own grief. It can be helpful for young people to have support from someone outside of the family, to enable them to share their thoughts and emotions, which if left unexpressed, can lead to anger, disruptive behaviour and concentration issues at school.

Our counsellors, in Cambridgeshire, can help by listening and encouraging young people to express their painful emotions through creative play and work.

Hope again is the youth website of Cruse Bereavement Care. It is a safe place where you can learn from other young people, how to cope with grief, and feel less alone.

 

The Sue Ryder Charity charity offers emotional support going through grief or for those that have a relative with a terminal illness. http://www.sueryder.org/advice-support/grief-publication

Child Bereavement UK is a national charity which offers support to Children facing bereavement or to families having experienced the loss of a child.

                                                              

Winstons Wish is a charity specialising in helping young people and children cope with the bereavement of a parent or sibling.

SOBS offer support for those that are survivors of bereavement through suicide.

Dying matters offers support around the death of a loved one or for those pre-bereavement

Maggies centre in Cambridge offers emotional and practical support to those where a member of the family has cancer.

The NHS has lots of useful advice and support during Bereavement which can be found HERE

BBC Radio 1 has lots of information for young people on coping with grief which can be found HERE

 

MENTAL HEALTH APPS

There are many apps out there that you can use to support your mental health and wellbeing. All these are available to download free from the App Store.


Anna Freud website has information and guidance on self help apps.

Some good Apps include:

 For me logo

For Me is a discreet Childline app that gives you access to: 1-2-1 chat with a counsellor, 'Ask Sam' problem page and a space to track your mood and write down your thoughts privately. Topics include issues such as school and exam stress, personal issues, self-harm and mental health.  

 Child Bereavement UK App

Child Bereavement UK have developed an app for 11-25 year olds who have been bereaved of someone important to them. It can also be used by friends, teachers, parents and professionals who would like to know how to support bereaved young people.

 

 

Calmharm is an app that  provides tasks to help you resist or manage the urge to self-harm. 

distrACT provides information and advice about self-harm and suicidal thoughts. It is free, and available for anyone over the age of 17.

 

In HandIn Hand helps you to focus yourself when you are feeling low or are in a moment of stress. Once the app knows how you feel, it will take you through steps to help you feel better. 

Smiling Mind logo

Smiling Mind is a free app that helps put a smile on your mind. The app takes you through guided meditation. 

 

Stem 4 logo Stem4 Support with self-harm provides activities to support you with urges to self-harm (comfort, distract, express or release).

 

Thrive helps to manage and prevent stress and anxiety. It is suitable for all aged 11+ and uses games to help track your moods, suggest ways to control stress and anxiety, and teach relaxation techniques. The app is free to download, but charges may apply for access to all functions. and available for anyone.  Alternatively you may be able to access the YMCA trinity group version via your school.  Click here for more information.

 Student Health App created by NHS doctors, provides reliable health information for university students. 

Big White Wall provides information, advice and self-help guidance about mental health, as well as access to a peer-support community. It is free, and available for anyone age 16+.

Anxiety Canada have a free app called 'MindShift™ CBT' which "uses scientifically proven strategies based on Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT) to help you learn to relax and be mindful, develop more effective ways of thinking, and use active steps to take charge of your anxiety."

Thinkninja picture

Healios have launched Thinkninja an app specifically designed to educate 10-18 year olds about mental health, emotional wellbeing and to provide skills young people can use to build resilience and stay well.


Other helpful websites that are worth taking a look at...

 

DOC ReadyDoc Ready can help you feel more confident when you go to see your GP about a mental health issue.

 

RESOURCES

This page has links to video's, podcasts and live discussions around young peoples mental health and wellbeing. Check these out! 

VIDEO - ORDINARY MAGIC: Resilience & Mental and Emotional Wellbeing in Schools

This short film has been made by the Education Wellbeing Team and young people in Cambridgeshire. It shows young peoples views and understanding of mental health. 

 

MENTAL HEALTH RESOURCES LEAFLET

This Insight series of leaflets by Cambridgeshire and Peterborough NHS Foundation trust, were designed and written by people who have personal experience of different mental health problems and the people who support them. They provide introductory information on a range of mental health problems and other issues relevant to mental health. They act as signposts to local sources of support and information. These have been written for adult mental health, but may be useful for young people.

VIDEO STREAM 3 - Sexual Health

 

VIDEO STREAM 2 - Stress, Mental Health and Relationships

A second webinar on stress, mental health and wellbeing took place on 17th May 2016 as part of Mental Health Awareness Week. The panel discussion included Cambridgeshire County Council, Mind in Cambridgeshire and Centre 33.

 

VIDEO STREAM 1 - Children and Young People's Mental Health and Wellbeing

This is a recording of a webinar on wellbeing and resilience that was produced by Cambridgeshire County Council and Huntingdonshire Regional College. Students did all the technical aspects of filming and live streaming that made this webinar possible. It will be a particularly helpful resource for parents, carers and teachers but of interest to many others!

 

Mental Health Awareness video

This short Mental Health Awareness video was produced by Healthwatch in Peterborough with local Youth Health Champions. It was designed for teenagers and explores what mental health is, what affects mental health, teenage specific pressures and how to manage poor mental health and more! It is a fantastic resource for schools and has been adopted by all Peterborough secondary schools.

 

OTHER USEFUL LINKS

There are many physical or neurological conditions that can have an impact on our mental health and well being. Managing long terms conditions, like epilepsy, can challenge our mental health. Here are some useful videos on understanding epilepsy.

 The BBC have a range of videos about young people and things that they worry about including anxiety,OCD and Bullying.They are suitable for KS2 and 3.They can be found HERE

 

We are continuously updating this website. if you know of any videos, blogs or podcasts that you would like to see on here please let us know.

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