Cambridgeshire & Peterborough Professionals Mental Health Support

Resources, Events and training

Training

April 2021 training opportunity with Kooth for professionals: 

Kooth training sessions for professionals. The sessions will include the following:

  • A live tour of Kooth
    • An introduction to Kooth and how it works.
    • Support on how to get young people signed up to Kooth.
    • Explanation of professional support available via Kooth and what young people can expect.
    • Explanation of Kooth's other features and support tools for young people.
    • An opportunity to ask questions regarding the service.

Kooth say this is good opportunity to give staff the confidence and knowledge needed when having conversations with students about addressing any concerns around mental health and wellbeing and encouraging them to make use of Kooth as a completely free online service which is fully commissioned and funded in 86% of the UK 

Book here:

Kooth professionals training webinar Friday 9th April 9.30-11am (google.com)

Kooth professionals training webinar Tuesday 13th April 10-11.30am (google.com)

Kooth professionals training webinar Monday 19th April 12-1.30pm (google.com)

Kooth professionals training webinar Tuesday 27th April 2.30-4pm (google.com)

Kooth is available to young people aged between 11-18, if you would like more information please do contact: 

Cheryl Allright (callright@kooth.com
Kooth Engagement Lead - London & South East
+44 (0)7497157139   www.koothplc.com


And here, we've put together a list of websites that can provide you with some more information about training and where you can get it.

NSPCC

Attensi collaborate with NSPCC Learning on new 3D learning tool to help adults talk to children about abuse

To support people who work or volunteer with children, we’ve offered our research and expertise and collaborated with gamified simulation specialists Attensi. The training provider has developed a pilot 3D, interactive learning tool called ‘Talk to Me’ to help adults build their confidence in having conversations with children about difficult topics like abuse, and ensure children always feel listened to.

The free tool enables learners to:

  • access simulated scenarios and interact with fictional child characters
  • learn how to respond to the children and build their trust to help them talk about their experiences to successfully complete each scenario
  • build knowledge and confidence to talk children about abuse.


Wellbeing for Education Return Programme 

The programme aims to support staff working in educational settings to respond to the additional pressures some children and young people may be feeling as a direct result of the pandemic. The programme is aimed at educational settings for children and young people aged 5-19. This includes maintained schools, academies, independent schools, further education colleges, specialist settings, pupil referral units, and alternative provision providers.

Registration details

Five (one hour, virtual) sessions will be offered, between November 2020 and June 2021.

  • It is expected attendees attend every session. There will be three options for attendance for each session (details overleaf).
  • Attendance on the programme is free. However, attendees that register and then fail to attend without providing 48 hours notice will be charged £56.43 per session missed.

You can find further information about session contents dates and times in this document

    Mental health competency framework 

    Training for Schools

    It is estimated that one in eight 5 to 19 year olds have suffered from at least one diagnosable mental disorder, therefore it is likely that many more will struggle with their mental health and emotional wellbeing at some point during their school years.

    We all have our role to play in supporting children and young people, and schools pay an important part in supporting young people that may be struggling with their mental health. It is vital that everyone working within a school has an understanding of what mental health is and has the confidence to recognise and respond to common issues.

    What is the mental health competency framework?

    Local Authority Public Health, YMCA Trinity Group, educational establishments and local NHS services have developed a competency based model of assessment to guide schools and colleges in identifying their training needs. The framework was created to simplify the complex picture of mental health training available. The aim is to ensure staff at all levels have the confidence to support children and young people by building core resilience skills, identifying emerging concerns at an early stage, and signposting to appropriate care pathways or interventions where possible. There is no expectation that education staff will diagnose or treat mental health problems.

    Click here to download the mental health competency framework.

    Click here to download the Quality Assurance checklist for Schools doc

    How do I use the framework?

    The framework has been designed as a self-assessment tool. One approach might be to review the tool within a staff meeting or with a smaller group including senior leads (including the mental health lead). The tool can be used to understand where current levels of understanding of mental health are within different staffing groups, and to highlight areas for improvement.

    What next?

    There are lots of local and national providers that can provide training, some of which is free to access. If you decide to purchase training, the quality assurance checklist below can help to ensure that you receive a quality service that fits your needs.

    Click here to download the Quality Assurance checklist for Schools doc’

    Local provision

    There is a range of training available for schools, some of which is funded. Training includes:

    Mental Health Forums for Schools – The Forums have been developed locally with a range of services to help schools set up the role of the Designated Senior Lead for Mental Health and adopt a whole school approach to mental health. Free to access and facilitated by professionals across Cambridgeshire and Peterborough, they will help schools assess their own provision, share good practice and signpost to support. The Forums will also be delivering the locally adapted national training package funded by the Department for Education in response to Covid-19. Information about the Forums will be circulated via the Local Authority education department. (The Forums will support achieving competencies in framework assessment stages 3 as well as other stages depending on theme).

    Emotional Health and Wellbeing Service (Free) – For more information 0300 555 50 60 or ccs.ehw@nhs.net (will support achieving competencies in framework assessment stages 1, 2 and 3)

    YMCA Trinity Group (there is a charge for some of this training) – For more information contact 01733 373187 or lisa.smith@ymcatrinity.org.uk (will support achieving competencies in framework assessment stages 1, 2 and 3)

    Cambridgeshire & Peterborough NHS Foundation Trust Learning & Development (there is a charge for some of this training) - For more information contact CAMHTrainingAdministrator@cpft.nhs.uk (will support achieving competencies in framework assessment stages 1 and 3)

     

    National provision

    MindEd (Free) - Online training for families and those working with children and young people. There are e-learning opportunities across a range of mental health topics.

    Young Minds offer training on a range of subjects from anxiety to social media.

    The Anti-Bullying Alliance (free) - CPD training for teachers and school staff, it also has a range of resources on tackling the subject of bullying.

    Zero Suicide Alliance (free) - Powerful training developed by Merseyside NHS around having conversations about suicide and preventing it if you come across a situation.

    SEND Educational Psychology Services - SEND Services provide targeted support and training to staff supporting students with all aspects of special educational needs, but particularly those experiencing social and emotional difficulties.

    Other mental health training

    • CPSL MIND offer training to businesses and community groups
    • Learning Together Cambridgeshire offer a range of adult learning courses
    • YMCA Trinity Group provide online and face to face training for a range of organisations and audiences including youth work, residential staff, early years, parents, community groups, and businesses

    Helplines

    All Mental Health Support Lines:

    • Samaritans: Call for all mental health and suicidal thoughts, 24hrs a day, 365 days a year - 116 123
    • Lifeline - Call everyday, 365 days a year 7pm-11pm for listening support and information to someone experiencing mental distress or if you are supporting someone in distress - 0808 808 2121
    • Mind Infoline: Call or text for help with all mental health challenges, Mon-Fri 9am-6pm - 0300 123 3393
    • Rethink Mental Illness: Call for support and advice on mental health, Mon-Fri 9.30am-4pm - 0300 5000 927
    • SANE: Call everyday for emotional support, information and guidance for people affected by mental challenges, their families and carers, 4.40-10.30pm - 0300 304 7000
    • CALM: Call for help and support with mental health challenges, everyday, 365 days a year, 5pm-midnight  - 0800 58 58 58
    • Shout: Text shout for support with a mental health crisis and other mental health challenges, 24 hours a day, 365 days a year - 85258

    Crisis Helplines:

    • Samaritans: Call for all mental health and suicidal thoughts, 24hrs a day, 365 days a year - 116 123
    • First Response Service: Call NHS 111 Option 2 if you're in crisis.

    Suicide Helplines:

    • Samaritans: Call for all mental health and suicidal thoughts, 24hrs a day, 365 days a year - 116 123
    • First Response Service: Call NHS 111 Option 2 if you're in crisis.
    • PAPYRUS HOPEline UK: (young suicide prevention society) Call Mon-Fri 10am-5pm and 7pm-10pm, Sat-Sun 2-5pm - 0800 068 4141

    Anxiety Helplines:

    • Anxiety UK: Call for help with anxiety challenges, available Mon-Fri between 9.30am-5.30pm - 03444 775 774 
    • No Panic: Call everyday for help and support for sufferers of panic attacks and OCD, 10am-10pm (charge 5p a minute + your access charge) - 0844 967 4848
    • No Panic Youth: (For 13-20 year olds) Call Mon, Tues, Wed and Fri 3pm-6pm; Thurs and Sat 6pm-8pm for help and support for sufferers of panic attacks and OCD - 0330 606 1174

    Depression Helplines:

    • Gypsy/Traveller Depression Suicidal helpline: Call, Text or WhatsApp - 0739365135

    Eating Disorders Helplines:

    • Beat (Adults): Call for eating disorder support - 0808 801 0677
    • Beat (Student Line): Call for eating disorder support - 0808 801 0811
    • Beat (Under 18's): Call for eating disorder support - 0808 801 0711

    Addiction Helplines:

    • Alcoholics Anonymous: Call 24hrs a day - 0845 769 7555
    • Narcotics Anonymous: Call daily until midnight - 0300 999 1212
    • Port Of Call (paid service with a free advice line): Call for free, available all hours for advice - 0808 291 1643
    • Cocaine Anonymous: Call 7 days a week between 10am-10pm, freephone - 0800 612 0225, Mobiles Call - 0300 111 2285
    • Drinkline - National alcohol helpline, Call weekdays 9am-8pm, weekends 11am-4pm - 0300 123 1110
    • The National Association for Children of Alcoholics (Nacoa) - Free confidential email and telephone helpline for children of alcohol dependent parents - 0800 358 3456 helpline@Nacoa.org.uk
    • Talk to Frank: Call 24 hours a day, offers encouragement and support to anyone struggling with such issues - 0300 123 6600

    OCD Helplines:

    • OCD Action: Call for support for living with OCD, Mon-Fri 9.30am-5pm - 0845 390 6232
    • OCD UK: Call for support for living with OCD, Mon-Fri 9am-5pm - 0845 120 3778
    • No Panic: Call everyday for help and support for sufferers of panic attacks and OCD, 10am-10pm (charge 5p a minute + your access charge) - 0844 967 4848
    • No Panic Youth: (For 13-20 year olds) Call Mon, Tues, Wed and Fri 3pm-6pm; Thurs and Sat 6pm-8pm for help and support for sufferers of panic attacks and OCD - 0330 606 1174

    LGBTQ+ Helplines:

    • Switchboard LGBT+: Call everyday 10am-10pm or chat online here - 0300 330 0630

    Carers Helplines:

    • Lifeline - Call everyday, 365 days a year 7pm-11pm for listening support and information to someone experiencing mental distress or if you are supporting someone in distress - 0808 808 2121
    • SANE: Call everyday for emotional support, information and guidance for people affected by mental challenges, their families and carers, 4.40-10.30pm - 0300 304 7000
    • NSPCC for Adults concerned about a child: Call 24hrs a day - 0808 800 5000
    • Mencap: Call for support for people with a learning disability, their families and carers, Mon-Fri 9am-5pm - 0808 808 1111
    • Women's Aid and Refuge: Call the National Domestic Violence Helpline 24/7 for support for victims of domestic violence, their friends and families/carers, and professionals - on 0808 2000 247.

    Helplines For Men:

    • Men's Health Forum: Call or text for support for men, 24hrs a day - 020 7922 7908

    Sexual Abuse Helplines:

    • Rape Crisis: (to find your local services) Call daily 12-2.30pm and 7-9.30pm - 0808 802 9999.

    Domestic Abuse Helplines:

    • Women's Aid and Refuge: Call the National Domestic Violence Helpline 24/7 -  0808 2000 247.
      Men's Advice Line:
       Call for advice and support for men experiencing domestic violence and abuse, Mon-Fri 9am-5pm - 0808 801 0327

    Victim Support Helplines:

    • Victim Support: Call Mon-Fri 8pm-8am and weekends Sat-Mon 5pm-8am - 0808 168 9111.
    • Embrace - Child Victims of Crime: Support for children, young people and families who are victims of a serious crime - 0345 60 999 60 

    Alzheimer's & Dementia Helplines:

    • Alzheimer's Society: Call for advice and information on dementia, Mon-Fri 9am-5pm, weekends 10am-4pm - 0300 222 1122

    Bipolar Disorder Helplines:

    • Bipolar UK: Call for advice and support about bipolar - 0333 323 3880

    Young People Helplines:

    • PAPYRUS HOPEline UK: (young suicide prevention society) Call Mon-Fri 10am-5pm and 7pm-10pm, Sat-Sun 2-5pm - 0800 068 4141 
    • YoungMinds: Call for information and advice on child and adolescent mental health, Mon-Fri 9.30am-4pm - 0808 802 5544
    • NSPCC Childline: Call 24hrs a day - 0800 1111
    • NSPCC for Adults concerned about a child: Call 24hrs a day - 0808 800 5000
    • Family Lives: Call for advice on all aspects of parenting including dealing with bullying, Mon-Fri 9am-9pm and Sat-Sun 10am-3pm - 0808 800 2222
    • YoungMinds Parents: Parents Helpline is available to offer advice to parents and carers worried about a child or young person under 25, Mon-Fri 9:30am-4pm - 0808 802 5544
    • Embrace Child Victims of Crime: Support for children, young people and families who are victims of a serious crime - 0345 60 999 60 

    Helplines For Emergency Services Employees:

    • Mind Blue Light Infoline: Call or text (text on 84999) for support for emergency services staff, Mon-Fri 9am-6pm - 0300 303 5999

    Bereavement Helplines:

    • Cruse Bereavement Care: Call Mon-Fri 9am-5pm - 0844 477 9400

    Disabilities Helplines:

    • Mencap: Call for support for people with a learning disability, their families and carers, Mon-Fri 9am-5pm - 0808 808 1111

    *Some information gathered from www.nhs.uk and the services listed.

    Resources

    Guidance for creating and promoting positive mental health and wellbeing in schools can be found on this page of our website; it includes a policy document created by Bottisham Village College and the CAMH Learning and Development team, Cambridgeshire and Peterborough NHS Foundation Trust, which is intended as a template for other secondary schools.

    The majority of the following resources have been taken from this policy's supporting information document.


    Anxiety, panic attacks and phobias

    Anxiety can take many forms in children and young people, and it is something that each of us experiences at low levels as part of normal life. When thoughts of anxiety, fear or panic are repeatedly present over several weeks or months and/or they are beginning to impact on a young person’s ability to access or enjoy day-to-day life, intervention is needed.

    Online support: 

      Books: 

      • Lucy Willetts and Polly Waite (2014) Can I Tell you about Anxiety?: A guide for friends, family and professionals. London: Jessica Kingsley Publishers
      • Carol Fitzpatrick (2015) A Short Introduction to Helping Young People Manage Anxiety. London: Jessica Kingsley Publishers


      Depression

      Ups and downs are a normal part of life for all of us, but for someone who is suffering from depression these ups and downs may be more extreme. Feelings of failure, hopelessness, numbness or sadness may invade their day-to-day life over an extended period of weeks or months, and have a significant impact on their behaviour and ability and motivation to engage in day-to-day activities.

      Online support: 

      • www.youngminds.org.uk Information and advice. Parent’s helpline.
      • www.relate.org.uk Counselling and on line information and support to families
      • https://www.cwmt.org.uk The Charlie Waller Memorial Trust seeks to equip young people to look after their mental wellbeing and to help people to recognise the signs of depression in themselves and others so that they know when to seek help.
      • www.inhand.org.uk A digital friend that provides young people with tools, advice and activities when their mental health is at risk
      • www.docready.org.uk helps young people feel more confident and get better results when they see their GP about a mental health issue.
      • www.findgetgive.org.uk offers support for young people to find mental health support in their area and give feedback on it.
      • www.headsmed.org.uk Accessible, straight talking information on young people’s mental health medication
      • CHUMS http://chums.uk.com/low-mood-and-feeling-sad/
      • CWMT https://www.cwmt.org.uk/parents-guide

      Books: 

      • Christopher Dowrick and Susan Martin (2015) Can I Tell you about Depression?: A guide for friends, family and professionals. London: Jessica Kingsley Publishers


      Eating problems

      Food, weight and shape may be used as a way of coping with, or communicating about, difficult thoughts, feelings and behaviours that a young person experiences day to day. Some young people develop eating disorders such as anorexia (where food intake is restricted), binge eating disorder and bulimia nervosa (a cycle of bingeing and purging). Other young people, particularly those of primary or preschool age, may develop problematic behaviours around food including refusing to eat in certain situations or with certain people. This can be a way of communicating messages the child does not have the words to convey.

      Online support:

      Books:

      • Bryan Lask and Lucy Watson (2014) Can I tell you about Eating Disorders?: A Guide for Friends, Family and Professionals. London: Jessica Kingsley Publishers
      • Pooky Knightsmith (2015) Self-Harm and Eating Disorders in Schools: A Guide to Whole School Support and Practical Strategies. London: Jessica Kingsley Publishers
      • Pooky Knightsmith (2012) Eating Disorders Pocketbook. Teachers’ Pocketbooks


      Obsessions and compulsions

      Obsessions describe intrusive thoughts or feelings that enter our minds which are disturbing or upsetting; compulsions are the behaviours we carry out in order to manage those thoughts or feelings. For example, a young person may be constantly worried that their house will burn down if they don’t turn off all switches before leaving the house. They may respond to these thoughts by repeatedly checking switches, perhaps returning home several times to do so. Obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) can take many forms – it is not just about cleaning and checking.

      Online support

      • OCD UK www.ocduk.org/ocd Advice line, Advocacy, publications, treatment information and support groups

      Books

      • Amita Jassi and Sarah Hull (2013) Can I Tell you about OCD?: A guide for friends, family and professionals. London: Jessica Kingsley Publishers
      • Susan Conners (2011) The Tourette Syndrome & OCD Checklist: A practical reference for parents and teachers. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass


      Self-Harm

      Self-harm describes any behaviour where a young person causes harm to themselves in order to cope with thoughts, feelings or experiences they are not able to manage in any other way. It most frequently takes the form of cutting, burning or non-lethal overdoses in adolescents, while younger children and young people with special needs are more likely to pick or scratch at wounds, pull out their hair or bang or bruise themselves.  

      Online support: 

      • www.SelfHarm.co.uk A project dedicated to supporting young people impacted by self harm, providing a safe space to talk, ask any questions and obtain help to overcome difficulties. It also provides information about how to stay safe
      • National Self-Harm Network: www.nshn.co.uk provides crisis support, information and resources, advice, discussion and distractions and is available 24/7. Also supports and provides information for families and carers
      • https://youngminds.org.uk/what-we-do/our-projects/no-harm-done No Harm Done? Created in collaboration with the Charlie Waller memorial trust and the Royal College of Psychiatrists. For young people who are self harming or at risk of self harming, their parents and professionals working with them. Provides a series or resource publications and short films.
      • https://www.familylives.org.uk/advice/teenagers/health-wellbeing/self-harm Family Lives is a charity helping parents to deal with the changes that are a constant part of family life members .They provide professional, non-judgmental support and advice through a helpline, extensive advice on the website, befriending services, and parenting/relationship support groups. Nearly all of our services are accessible at no charge to parents 365 days a year

      Books: 

      • Pooky Knightsmith (2015) Self-Harm and Eating Disorders in Schools: A Guide to Whole School Support and Practical Strategies. London: Jessica Kingsley Publishers
      • Keith Hawton and Karen Rodham (2006) By Their Own Young Hand: Deliberate Self-harm and Suicidal Ideas in Adolescents. London: Jessica Kingsley Publishers
      • Carol Fitzpatrick (2012) A Short Introduction to Understanding and Supporting Children and Young People Who Self-Harm. London: Jessica Kingsley Publishers
      • Understanding and responding to children and young people at risk of self-harm and suicide.(2014)CPFT https://www.cpft.nhs.uk/U%20R%20CYP%20at%20risk%20of%20selfharm%20and%20suicide%202014%20v1%20electronic.pdf

       


      Suicidal feelings

      Young people may experience complicated thoughts and feelings about wanting to end their own lives. Some young people never act on these feelings though they may openly discuss and explore them, while other young people die suddenly from suicide apparently out of the blue.

      See Section D and Risk flowchart (in the [policy's supporting information document) for guidance on responding to risk and getting support

      Online support

      Books

      • Keith Hawton and Karen Rodham (2006) By Their Own Young Hand: Deliberate Selfharm and Suicidal Ideas in Adolescents. London: Jessica Kingsley Publishers
      • Terri A.Erbacher, Jonathan B. Singer and Scott Poland (2015) Suicide in Schools: A Practitioner’s Guide to Multi-level Prevention, Assessment, Intervention, and Postvention. New York: Routledge

      Guidance and advice documents

      Local and national guidance documents, as well as additional resources relating to mentally healthy schools, can be found in the policy's supporting information document here.


      Staff Wellbeing Policy

      Information and guidance on how to promote positive mental health and wellbeing for staff in schools can be found here.


      Questioning Gender Identity

      Most people identify with the gender they are born with, ie male or female, boy or girl. Often young children dress in clothes associated with other genders when they are aged between 3-5 years old, this is a normal transitory part of play and development. Yet, some people experience conflict around their gender (gender dysphoria) and feel that their gender identity is different from the physical make up of their body.

      Children or young people may want to use a different word or label for themselves and may experience discomfort around parts of their body. This can be very upsetting and scary for them, particularly as they go through puberty.  For some these feelings pass, for others they don’t. It’s good to encourage them to talk and to seek help so you know how to care for them.

      Many people who feel this way identify with the term transgender (or trans for short), which comes from the Latin ‘trans’ meaning ‘across or to cross over’. Some people identify as non-binary without considering themselves transgender, and some people adopt other labels like agender (not having a gender), bigender (having two genders) or genderfluid (having a gender that changes over time).

      The child or young person may find it distressing when people use words or treat them in a way that doesn’t align with how they perceive themselves to be – for instance referring to them as a boy when they feel they are a girl. These feelings of distress about the difference between their physical body and what they feel, can be very upsetting for transgender, non-binary and gender questioning people, though not everyone will experience them, and they may pass.

      Gender dysphoria can have an impact on the emotional wellbeing or mental health of the young person or child. However, being transgender is not a mental health condition itself – it is an identity. Many parents have concerns about gender dysphoria and emotional wellbeing. We would encourage them to listen to their child, letting them talk for as long as they want in a non-judgemental way. This will give them the space to explore their own feelings in an accepting environment. You may also find it helpful to talk to a colleague who has more experience, or a support group listed below. There may be instances where you need to speak to a safeguarding lead in order to carefully consider the circumstances surrounding the request for further interventions.

      Resources

      Support Services for Transgender, Non-binary and Gender Questioning People

      • The Kite Trust is available to support all LGBTQ+ young people in Cambridgeshire, Peterborough and surrounding areas – this includes those who are trans, non-binary or questioning their gender. If you have questions about someone you care for and/or work with, you can get in touch via their website. They offer tailored trans-specific and broader LGBTQ+ training and consultancy for professionals, and for education professionals, the year-long holistic Rainbow Flag Award (link to: https://www.rainbowflagaward.co.uk/). Visit thekitetrust.org.uk, email info@thekitetrust.org.uk or call 01223 369508.
      • Gendered Intelligence are a national charity who support trans, non-binary and questioning young people. They also offer training and consultancy for professionals as well as a range of resources on their website. Visit http://genderedintelligence.co.uk/professionals/overview to find out more about their current services.
      • Encompass Network maintain a calendar of upcoming events for LGBTQ+ people in Cambridgeshire and Peterborough and links to lots of different local support groups across the county. You can find out more at: http://encompassnetwork.org.uk/calendar

      The Gender Identity Research & Education Society also maintain ‘Tranzwiki’ which includes a listing of groups and support services across the country. Those in the East of England can be found at: https://www.tranzwiki.net/regions/east-england

      Creating Mentally Healthy Schools

      A Whole-School Approach to Mental Health

      A whole-school approach means making child, staff and parent/carer mental health and wellbeing ‘everybody’s business’. It involves all parts of the school working together and being committed. It needs partnership working between governors, senior leaders, teachers and all school staff as well as parents, carers and the wider community (Mentally Healthy Schools). For more information visit https://www.mentallyhealthyschools.org.uk/whole-school-approach/.

      There are lots of helpful documents and frameworks to develop a whole-school approach to mental health, these include:

      National Children’s Bureau: A whole school framework for emotional well being and mental health: a self-assessment and improvement tool for school leaders. Outlines a four-stage approach, including first identifying what is already in place in the school.

      Public Health England: ‘Promoting children and young people’s emotional health and wellbeing: a whole school and college approach’. 

      DfE/NatCen Social Research/National Children’s Bureau: ‘Supporting mental health in schools and colleges’ 

      g

      School Policy  - Promoting positive mental health and wellbeing  

      The policy document found here is the outcome of a collaboration between Bottisham Village College and the CAMH Learning and Development team, Cambridgeshire and Peterborough NHS Foundation Trust. It is intended as a template for other secondary schools and will therefore be made available across the county. However, it is not meant to be adopted without due process and careful and thorough consideration of the individual school’s needs in relation to the emotional wellbeing and mental health of its pupils and staff. 

      Guidance as to how the policy could be customised can be found here.

      Other useful resources for creating mentally healthy schools

      Heads Together and the Anna Freud Centre have launched the Mentally Healthy Schools website which brings together quality-assured information, advice and resources to help primary schools understand and promote children’s mental health and wellbeing. Their aim is to increase staff awareness, knowledge and confidence to help you support your pupils. Resources include lessons plans, assemblies, films and general information on a range of topics and issues.

      Schools in Mind Network:

      The Schools in Mind Network is run by the Anna Freud Centre, by joining the network your school will be able to access a range of free resources. This includes films to use in lessons, assembly plans as well as a range of films featuring experts talking about different mental health issues and giving advice aimed at teaching staff. Joining the network also enables you to keep up to date with the 'You're never to Young to Talk About Mental Health' campaign.

      For more information visit: http://www.annafreud.org/what-we-do/schools-in-mind/

      Papyrus’ ‘Building Suicide-Safer Schools and Colleges: A guide for teachers and staff’ covers:

      • Developing a Suicide Prevention Policy
      • Asking About Suicide
      • Responding to a Suicide
      • Working with Community Support

      Access the guide here: save the class toolkit:

      PSHE

      The following short films are designed to show how teaching Personal, Social and Health Education (PSHE) in schools and colleges can support children and young people’s personal development. They illustrate how knowledge, skills and attitudes explored during this learning can potentially have a positive impact on children and young people’s mental and emotional wellbeing.

      The films involve pupils from a primary and secondary school in Cambridgeshire where the ethos and culture supports and promotes children’s and young people health and wellbeing. In these schools, teaching and learning in PSHE are prioritised, and as well as being taught explicitly via designated periods of time, form an integral part of the schools’ practice.

      The lessons represent a snapshot of activities that would form part of a longer term personal development programme. They showcase examples of PSHE teaching and learning methodologies that could be delivered during a PSHE lesson or tutor time and are designed to serve as an illustrative guide rather than examples of standalone lessons. We would advise reading the accompanying guidance for each film before teaching lessons based on the content of the film.

      The lessons will also support the requirements for the forthcoming statutory status for Relationships Education, and possible statutory status for PSHE.

      We would really appreciate it if you could take a few moments to answer the 4 questions via this link once you have accessed the films:

      Healthy Relationships - Accompanying Notes  (Secondary School)

      Body Image - Accompanying Notes  (Secondary School)

      Anti-bullying - Accompanying Notes (Secondary School)

      Conflict Resolution - Accompanying Notes  (Primary School)

        My Emotions - Accompanying Notes   (Primary School)

      Acknowledgements: We would like to thank the two Cambridgeshire schools for hosting this project, and the pupils for their participation. We would also like to thank Edd Mitchell from Burwell House in Cambridgeshire for creating the films.  

      The Cambridgeshire PSHE Service provides support, guidance and training on the themed areas and approaches explored in these films. Email pshe@cambridgeshire.gov.uk for information about teaching materials and resources designed to support schools in delivering these aspects of the PSHE curriculum.  

      The BBC has a range of short videos about young people and the things they worry about including bullying,anxiety and OCD. They are suitable for Key stage 2 and 3 and can be found HERE

      The Mix now has information and support all about healthy relationships.

      Pupil Voice

      The Pupil Voice Toolkit was developed by PSHE as a free resource to support schools and colleges to work with our children and young people to explore ways of promoting their mental and emotional wellbeing. The process involves children in identifying self-help opportunities and ways in which school and community provision could further enhance their mental and emotional wellbeing. It will help school leaders make use of school level data to identify the mental wellbeing needs of children and to determine how best to address these. The resources in the toolkit are based on mental and emotional wellbeing examples, however, the tools could be adapted to apply to other topic areas also.

      Mental and Emotional Wellbeing - Engaging Children and Young People in Planning Provision

      Toolkit Contents

      Section A - Process Documents

      Primary Schools

      1. Briefing
      2. Research and data sources
      3. Methodologies for collecting and exploring views
      4. Information for parents and carers
      5. Programme sessions 1 and 2

      Secondary Schools

      1. Briefing
      2. Research and data sources
      3. Methodologies for collecting and exploring views
      4. Invtation for pupils
      5. Successful applicants
      6. Unsuccessful applicants
      7. Information for parents and carers
      8. Programme Sessions 1 and 2
      9. Programme Session 3 and 4
      10. Invitation to feedback event
      11. Mental health curriculum audit tool

      Section B - Supporting Resources

      Primary

      1. Primary Draw and Write mental health
      2. Safety circle and network of support
      3. Self assessment teacher instructions
      4. Y1-2 self assessment mental and emotional wellbeing
      5. Y3-4 self assessment mental and emotional wellbeing
      6. Y5-6 self assessment mental and emotional wellbeing
      7. Action planning framework
      8. Sample certificate for pupils

      Secondary Schools

      1. Mental and emotional wellbeing card exercise
      2. Mental Health - the group's view (Heading)
      3. Areas of Mental Health (Headings)
        1. Life Satisfaction
        2. Resilience
        3. Self esteem
        4. Trust
      4. Worries (Heading)
      5. Action planning framework
      6. Sample certificate for pupils

      Section C - Examples of Work from Pilot Schools

      Primary Schools

      1. HRBS data from primary school
      2. Key Stage 2 Draw and Write Feedback
      3. PSHE journey around our school

      Secondary Schools

      1. Introduction
      2. Health Related Behaviour Survey - sample powerpoint
      3. Mental Health - the group's view
      4. Worries
      5. Areas of mental health - Key Messages
      6. Mental health - reviewing the school's approaches
      7. Mental health - summary of key messages
      8. Action plan resulting from key messages

      Suicide and self harm presentation

      Full Presentation can be found here!

      Events

      Wellbeing for education return programme 2020

      The programme aims to support staff working in educational settings to respond to the additional pressures some children and young people may be feeling as a direct result of the pandemic. The programme is aimed at educational settings for children and young people aged 5-19. This includes maintained schools, academies, independent schools, further education colleges, specialist settings, pupil referral units, and alternative provision providers.

      Registration details

      Five (one hour, virtual) sessions will be offered, between November 2020 and June 2021.

      • It is expected attendees attend every session. There will be three options for attendance for each session (details overleaf).
      • Attendance on the programme is free. However, attendees that register and then fail to attend without providing 48 hours notice will be charged £56.43 per session missed.

      You can find further information about registration, session contents, dates and times in this document


      Taylorfitch website