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Cambridgeshire & Peterborough Professionals Mental Health Support

Resources

Guidance for creating and promoting positive mental health and wellbeing in schools can be found on this page of our website; it includes a policy document created by Bottisham Village College and the CAMH Learning and Development team, Cambridgeshire and Peterborough NHS Foundation Trust, which is intended as a template for other secondary schools.

The majority of the following resources have been taken from this policy's supporting information document.


Anxiety, panic attacks and phobias

Anxiety can take many forms in children and young people, and it is something that each of us experiences at low levels as part of normal life. When thoughts of anxiety, fear or panic are repeatedly present over several weeks or months and/or they are beginning to impact on a young person’s ability to access or enjoy day-to-day life, intervention is needed.

Online support: 

    Books: 

    • Lucy Willetts and Polly Waite (2014) Can I Tell you about Anxiety?: A guide for friends, family and professionals. London: Jessica Kingsley Publishers
    • Carol Fitzpatrick (2015) A Short Introduction to Helping Young People Manage Anxiety. London: Jessica Kingsley Publishers


    Depression

    Ups and downs are a normal part of life for all of us, but for someone who is suffering from depression these ups and downs may be more extreme. Feelings of failure, hopelessness, numbness or sadness may invade their day-to-day life over an extended period of weeks or months, and have a significant impact on their behaviour and ability and motivation to engage in day-to-day activities.

    Online support: 

    • www.youngminds.org.uk Information and advice. Parent’s helpline.
    • www.relate.org.uk Counselling and on line information and support to families
    • https://www.cwmt.org.uk The Charlie Waller Memorial Trust seeks to equip young people to look after their mental wellbeing and to help people to recognise the signs of depression in themselves and others so that they know when to seek help.
    • www.inhand.org.uk A digital friend that provides young people with tools, advice and activities when their mental health is at risk
    • www.docready.org.uk helps young people feel more confident and get better results when they see their GP about a mental health issue.
    • www.findgetgive.org.uk offers support for young people to find mental health support in their area and give feedback on it.
    • www.headsmed.org.uk Accessible, straight talking information on young people’s mental health medication
    • CHUMS http://chums.uk.com/low-mood-and-feeling-sad/
    • CWMT https://www.cwmt.org.uk/parents-guide

    Books: 

    • Christopher Dowrick and Susan Martin (2015) Can I Tell you about Depression?: A guide for friends, family and professionals. London: Jessica Kingsley Publishers


    Eating problems

    Food, weight and shape may be used as a way of coping with, or communicating about, difficult thoughts, feelings and behaviours that a young person experiences day to day. Some young people develop eating disorders such as anorexia (where food intake is restricted), binge eating disorder and bulimia nervosa (a cycle of bingeing and purging). Other young people, particularly those of primary or preschool age, may develop problematic behaviours around food including refusing to eat in certain situations or with certain people. This can be a way of communicating messages the child does not have the words to convey.

    Online support:

    Books:

    • Bryan Lask and Lucy Watson (2014) Can I tell you about Eating Disorders?: A Guide for Friends, Family and Professionals. London: Jessica Kingsley Publishers
    • Pooky Knightsmith (2015) Self-Harm and Eating Disorders in Schools: A Guide to Whole School Support and Practical Strategies. London: Jessica Kingsley Publishers
    • Pooky Knightsmith (2012) Eating Disorders Pocketbook. Teachers’ Pocketbooks


    Obsessions and compulsions

    Obsessions describe intrusive thoughts or feelings that enter our minds which are disturbing or upsetting; compulsions are the behaviours we carry out in order to manage those thoughts or feelings. For example, a young person may be constantly worried that their house will burn down if they don’t turn off all switches before leaving the house. They may respond to these thoughts by repeatedly checking switches, perhaps returning home several times to do so. Obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) can take many forms – it is not just about cleaning and checking.

    Online support

    • OCD UK www.ocduk.org/ocd Advice line, Advocacy, publications, treatment information and support groups

    Books

    • Amita Jassi and Sarah Hull (2013) Can I Tell you about OCD?: A guide for friends, family and professionals. London: Jessica Kingsley Publishers
    • Susan Conners (2011) The Tourette Syndrome & OCD Checklist: A practical reference for parents and teachers. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass


    Self-Harm

    Self-harm describes any behaviour where a young person causes harm to themselves in order to cope with thoughts, feelings or experiences they are not able to manage in any other way. It most frequently takes the form of cutting, burning or non-lethal overdoses in adolescents, while younger children and young people with special needs are more likely to pick or scratch at wounds, pull out their hair or bang or bruise themselves.  

    Online support: 

    • www.SelfHarm.co.uk A project dedicated to supporting young people impacted by self harm, providing a safe space to talk, ask any questions and obtain help to overcome difficulties. It also provides information about how to stay safe
    • National Self-Harm Network: www.nshn.co.uk provides crisis support, information and resources, advice, discussion and distractions and is available 24/7. Also supports and provides information for families and carers
    • https://youngminds.org.uk/what-we-do/our-projects/no-harm-done No Harm Done? Created in collaboration with the Charlie Waller memorial trust and the Royal College of Psychiatrists. For young people who are self harming or at risk of self harming, their parents and professionals working with them. Provides a series or resource publications and short films.
    • https://www.familylives.org.uk/advice/teenagers/health-wellbeing/self-harm Family Lives is a charity helping parents to deal with the changes that are a constant part of family life members .They provide professional, non-judgmental support and advice through a helpline, extensive advice on the website, befriending services, and parenting/relationship support groups. Nearly all of our services are accessible at no charge to parents 365 days a year

    Books: 

    • Pooky Knightsmith (2015) Self-Harm and Eating Disorders in Schools: A Guide to Whole School Support and Practical Strategies. London: Jessica Kingsley Publishers
    • Keith Hawton and Karen Rodham (2006) By Their Own Young Hand: Deliberate Self-harm and Suicidal Ideas in Adolescents. London: Jessica Kingsley Publishers
    • Carol Fitzpatrick (2012) A Short Introduction to Understanding and Supporting Children and Young People Who Self-Harm. London: Jessica Kingsley Publishers
    • Understanding and responding to children and young people at risk of self-harm and suicide.(2014)CPFT https://www.cpft.nhs.uk/U%20R%20CYP%20at%20risk%20of%20selfharm%20and%20suicide%202014%20v1%20electronic.pdf

     


    Suicidal feelings

    Young people may experience complicated thoughts and feelings about wanting to end their own lives. Some young people never act on these feelings though they may openly discuss and explore them, while other young people die suddenly from suicide apparently out of the blue.

    See Section D and Risk flowchart (in the [policy's supporting information document) for guidance on responding to risk and getting support

    Online support

    Books

    • Keith Hawton and Karen Rodham (2006) By Their Own Young Hand: Deliberate Selfharm and Suicidal Ideas in Adolescents. London: Jessica Kingsley Publishers
    • Terri A.Erbacher, Jonathan B. Singer and Scott Poland (2015) Suicide in Schools: A Practitioner’s Guide to Multi-level Prevention, Assessment, Intervention, and Postvention. New York: Routledge

    Guidance and advice documents

    Local and national guidance documents, as well as additional resources relating to mentally healthy schools, can be found in the policy's supporting information document here.


    Staff Wellbeing Policy

    Information and guidance on how to promote positive mental health and wellbeing for staff in schools can be found here.

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