Cambridgeshire & Peterborough Adults Mental Health Support

Self-Help

LOOKING AFTER YOUR WELLBEING

There are lots of things you can do to help yourself stay well and have good wellbeing: including eating well, spending time with others, getting a good night's sleep and taking some regular exercise. Many of the things that are good for our physical health are also good for keeping our minds well too.

Some people find the '5 Ways to Wellbeing' a useful way of thinking about how you can look after your wellbeing:

1. Connect with the people around you and make time for family or friends.                  

2. Be active - Go for a run, play football, cycle to college or sign up for a dance class...whatever it is, make sure it is something you enjoy. 

3. Take notice – Pay attention to your senses – what can you see, feel, taste, smell and hear?

4. Keep learning – Try something new, be it a new recipe or taking up an evening class.

5. Give - Do something nice for a friend, or a stranger. Thank someone. Smile :) Volunteer your time. It can be incredibly rewarding.

Making a few small changes to your lifestyle could make a big difference, these websites might be able to help:

-Lets Get Moving Cambridgeshire LogoLet's Get Moving Cambridgeshire aims to improve the health of the Cambridgeshire population, specifically by increasing levels of physical activity. This will be done by promoting existing opportunities, developing new opportunities, and supporting individuals that require support to achieve their goals.

-One You logo - Whether it’s getting more active, quitting smoking or reducing how much alcohol you drink this website can help!  

 

Want to try out mindfulness? Need a little boost? Then check out the Apps page for a little inspiration! 

*Some information gathered from www.nhs.uk and the services listed.

MENTAL HEALTH APPS

Technology is becoming more and more prominent in everyday life, and it can be a great resource when we need a little bit of support. So here we've made a list of some great apps for your wellbeing and mental health.

The NHS App library has lots of different apps, some of which have clinical evidence to show that they help some people (these ones are labelled ‘NHS Approved’) and others are currently undergoing testing to see how effective they are.

Check out some apps on the NHS site here!

Other Mental Health and Wellbeing apps:

headspace app

  • Headspace. (Anxiety, Meditation, Sleep, Focus, Mindfulness)

App Store badgeGoogle play badge

 

Dare app

  • Dare. (Anxiety, Panic Attacks)

App Store badgeGoogle play badge

 

Calm app

  • Calm. (Meditation, Sleep, Stress, Mindfulness, Focus, Relationships)

App Store badgeGoogle play badge

 

elefriends app

App Store badgeGoogle play badge

 

Silvercloud app

  • Silver Cloud. (Anxiety, Depression, Stress, Wellbeing, Chronic Illness)

App Store badgeGoogle play badge

 

reasons2 app

App Store badgeGoogle play badge

 

happier app

  • Happier. (Sleep, Productivity, Stress)

App Store badge

 

catch it app

  • Catch It. (Anxiety, Depression, Anger, Wellbeing, Confusion)

App Store badgeGoogle play badge

 

calm harm app

App Store badgeGoogle play badge

 

stay alive app

App Store badgeGoogle play badge

 

wellmind app

App Store badgeGoogle play badge

 

SAM app

App Store badgeGoogle play badge

 

fear tools app

App Store badgeGoogle play badge

 

couch to 5k app

App Store badgeGoogle play badge

 

smart recipe app

App Store badgeGoogle play badge

 

RR recovery record app

App Store badgeGoogle play badge

 

RR app

App Store badgeGoogle play badge

 

stepfinder app

App Store badge

 

mindshift app

App Store badgeGoogle play badge

 

Hub of Hope app

App Store badgeGoogle play badge

myhouseofmemories

App Store badgeGoogle play badge

meetup

App Store badgeGoogle play badge

*Some information gathered from www.nhs.uk and the services listed.

BOOKS/ONLINE HELP

Books:  

Books on Prescription

Reading Well Books on Prescription helps you to understand and manage your health and wellbeing using self-help reading. The scheme is endorsed by health professionals and supported by public libraries.

Mood Boosting Books

Reading Well Mood-boosting Books is a national promotion of uplifting titles, including novels, poetry and non-fiction. The books are all recommended by readers and reading groups.

Shelf-Help is a global book club and community dedicated to self-help and self-development, the Shelf Help mission is to connect as many people as possible with books, ideas and experts that will inspire them to look at themselves in a different, more positive way. And then to connect these people with each other, through online and offline meetups and author events.

 

Online:

MoodJuice is a website that enables you to download CBT based self help booklets
A free online CBT interactive programme for anxiety and depression.

Living Life To The Full is a free online interactive programme for anxiety and depression.

MoodGym is a CBT based resource for anxiety and depression tailored for 16-25 year olds.

Given that we must all potentially isolate, here is a list of resources to prevent boredom/ existential angst:

The Silver Line is a telephone befriending service for the elderly

LLTTF is an online cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) site

Young Minds is a children and adolescent mental health support resource

Headspace is for meditation/ relaxation and sleep resources

MIND has wellbeing advice

Cruse has bereavement counselling

Samaritans hear to listen 

Mood Juice is an online resource for all mental health issues, including bereavement

H.A.Y. (How Are You Cambridgeshire) has wellbeing tips.

H.A.Y. (How Are You Peterborough) has wellbeing tips.

CPFT have lots of IAPT videos available on their YouTube.

Course RA is an online resource for skills building

Youtube has complete online free music concerts

Stage It has online theatre productions

Drama Online Library has online plays and theatrical performances

Duolingo is a free website for learning languages which can be very useful if you're looking to learn a new language.  Also comes in a phone app which is very good

Free old novels and short story collections can be found on Project Gutenberg and Wikisource:
https://www.gutenberg.org/
https://wikisource.org/wiki/Main_Page

Virtual museum tours

Get Self-Help: Provides Cognitive Behavioural Therapy self-help and resources.

*Some information gathered from www.nhs.uk and the services listed.

Covid-19

SUPPORT DURING THE CORONAVIRUS

Due to Coronavirus (COVID-19),  a number of services have had to make changes to how they provide support to people.  If you are currently accessing support from a service they will be in touch or please contact them for up to date information about their services. There are a number of useful resources which can support you during this time, these can be found here.

During this time, if you are self-isolating or social distancing because of coronavirus (COVID-19), it is important to look after your mental health. Here are some tips that may help.

If you are at risk of domestic abuse or do not feel safe self isolating at home there are support services out there to help. If you are not safe at home and are escaping domestic abuse, the household isolation restrictions as a result of COVID-19 do not apply to you. Click here for domestic abuse support.

The First Response Service supports people experiencing a mental health crisis so if you need urgent support please call 111 and choose option 2. The First Response Service provides 24-hour access, seven days a week, 365 days a year, to mental health care, advice, support and treatment.

SUPPORT SERVICE UPDATES

Due to COVID-19, some services have had to change how they are operating in order to keep everyone safe. Below you can see what services have updates.

Click here to read the Cambridgeshire Council COVID-19 Update.

Click here to read the CPFT (Cambridgeshire and Peterborough Foundation Trust) updates.

Skip to:

Bereavement Services:

Eating Disorder Services:

Older People Services:

Self-Harm Services:

Sexual and Domestic Abuse Services:

PTSD Services:

Drug/Alcohol Abuse Treatment Services:

Pregnancy Services:

Isolation Services:

Anxiety, Depression and Stress Services:

Personality Disorder Services:

Young People Services:

LGBTQ+ Services :

Victims & Witnesses Services :

Disability Services :

Other Services :


Bereavement Services:

Lifecraft - date updated 30/03/2020

"We are currently able to continue running Lifeline for anyone living in Cambridgeshire and Peterborough, as well as our counselling and suicide bereavement support services for existing clients.  Most support is now being provided via telephone and video calls.

Following Government guidance the following groups will not take place in Cambridge or Newmarket until Wednesday 17 June:

– Art Group
– Craft for Smiles
– Resilience Group
– Meditation and Mindfulness
– Social Clubs
– Hearing Voices Group

Member applications will be processed once the groups are re-opened.

We will be updating members regularly throughout this time.

The Lifecraft Team"

Child Bereavement UK - date updated 30/03/2020
"Child Bereavement UK recognises its duty of care to all those who use our bereavement services, attend our training and fundraising events, visit our premises, fundraise, volunteer or work for the charity.

We have been following government advice relating to the covid-19 pandemic and have taken action to reduce the spread of coronavirus. As a result of this, all our premises are now closed; however, our staff are working remotely and we are continuing to provide support to families by telephone and digital means."

Arthur Rank Hospice - date updated 30/03/2020
"We have made some further changes to delivery of clinical services in light of the newest guidelines on COVID-19.  
In order to keep our Inpatient and community services running, we have - where necessary and appropriate -redeployed colleagues into clinical support roles. 
Please see below for further information, but please be aware that this is subject to constant review.  We will do our best to keep you informed of the latest via this website page, as new official guidance is released.
We are still admitting patients
In light of latest guidance we are having to review the rules on visitors. Please click HERE for the latest information. Please note that these restrictions may be tightened at any point, should we need to react immediately in response to the current situation. 
 
If you have a loved one who is being cared for, please call to check with the Inpatient Unit team before leaving home, on 01223 675777. 
These services are still being provided but in line with many, we are moving as much provision as possible to telephone and online support. We will still visit if a visit is needed and we are still providing overnight Hospice at Home care and support. 
AHDTC has closed Day Therapy but it is continuing treatments in patients own homes, where possible.  If you are expecting to see a member of the team and have not yet received a call, please do contact the team on 01945 669620.
Hospice at Home and community services are being managed as above.
We have made the difficult decisions to close our Day Therapy services, although telephone support is still being provided. 

PATIENT & FAMILY AND BEREAVEMENT SUPPORT 
How this is delivered is under review, further information to follow.  We have commenced moving as much as possible to telephone and online support and this provision is likely to increase where visits are no longer possible. 
In person appointments are now ceasing, with appointments and support to be provided via telephone and video calls and online methods. All current patients will be contacted by our colleagues.
OUTPATIENT APPOINTMENTS 
These are ceasing, with new methods of support being put in place, such as telephone and video calls and online methods. All current patients will be contacted by our colleagues.
TELEPHONE ADVICE SUPPORT
Running as usual for healthcare professionals. "

Cambridge University Counselling Service - date updated 30/03/2020
"During the COVID-19 situation, the University Counselling Service will be offering telephone or video welfare appointments in place of individual counselling to all students who are currently on our waiting list. 

If you are not currently on our waiting list but would like to arrange an appointment, please complete a new pre-counselling form (click onto this link) and your name will be added to the waiting list. 

We will update the waiting times for appointments as soon as possible. Please keep checking our website for further information. 

Our self-help information will be updated regularly Self Help

Emergency contact information can be found here Emergency Contacts"

The Compassionate Friends - date updated 30/03/2020
"

In light of the recent Government recommendations that the UK population should wherever possible avoid social contact and that all non-essential travel and meetings are avoided, we have made the decision to suspend all Compassionate Friends group support meetings and face to face support due to the rise in the spread of coronavirus. This is not a decision we have taken lightly, but rather it is to protect the health of our members and the wider community.

We very aware that our support groups are a place where you can safely come and talk about your child and share any thoughts and feelings around your bereavement; so we appreciate that many of you will find it difficult that this support is not available for the time being.

Please do remember that you can call the TCF Helpline any day of the week if you would like to speak with another bereaved parent who is there to listen on 0345 123 2304 (10 am – 4 pm, 7 -10 pm). If the Helpline is busy, please clearly leave your name, number and a short message and one of our team will get back to you as soon as they can (please note, this may not be the same day). You can also email the helpline for support at helpline@tcf.org.uk.

Please do also consider joining one of our private Facebook Groups or online Forum for support and to talk with other bereaved parents and siblings. Details are here

Our postal library will still be operating but will offer a more limited service during this time. For more information contact Mary at library@tcf.org.uk."

CPSL MIND - date updated 30/03/2020
"

It is with regret that we have to announce the temporary suspension of our community-based services – namely our Good Mood cafes, Open Door calm spaces, Peer Support Groups and Perinatal Groups – until further notice.

Our Changing Lives Counselling Service has also been temporarily suspended and we will be unable to accept new referrals at this time. Our Cognitive Behavioural Therapy service will continue but as a telephone-based service instead of face-to-face. All individuals affected will be contacted directly.

At this stage, this temporary suspension will not affect the Sanctuary or individuals receiving specialist care packages through our Good Life service. Individuals will be advised directly of any changes to their care.

If you have an upcoming training course booked with us and have concerns, please contact us on 0300 303 4363. You will be contacted directly by our Training Team to notify you of any cancellations.

Please visit https://www.cpslmind.org.uk/suspension for a full summary of the services affected and for details of who to contact with questions or concerns.

This decision has been taken as a precautionary measure, in response to the government’s advice regarding the coronavirus (COVID-19) infection, to protect the health and welfare of individuals engaging with our services as well as our volunteers and staff.

We are reviewing the situation regularly to re-open all of our services as soon as possible and we will issue a further statement as the situation develops.

We understand that the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic may cause anxiety and advise anyone who is concerned to read national Mind’s information page ‘Coronavirus and your wellbeing’.

If you are experiencing an emotional or mental health crisis in Cambridgeshire or Peterborough, please call the NHS First Response Service on 111, Option 2 or visit cpslmind.org.uk/need-help-now/ for more helplines."

Cruse - date updated 30/03/2020
"

If you are a current Cruse client

If you are receiving one-to-one support your volunteer or Local Service will be in touch to let you know how we can continue to support you. 

Group support, Understanding Your Bereavement, Friendship Groups, Activity Groups and Training are all postponed until 1st May 2020. We will continue to review the situation in line with government’s advice.

If you are bereaved and self-isolating

If you rely on support from others while dealing with a bereavement – whether that’s family, friends, being at work – and you are struggling being on your own then our helpline is open - call 0808 808 1677

For more support please refer to our friends at Mind and Samaritans:

www.mind.org.uk/information-support/coronavirus-and-your-wellbeing/

www.samaritans.org/

If you have been bereaved by the virus

You can contact our helpline – 0808 808 1677 

The helpline is open Monday-Friday 9.30-5pm (excluding bank holidays), with extended hours on Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday evenings, when we’re open until 8pm."

SANDS - date updated 30/03/2020
  • "All Sands events until the end of May are now cancelled, this includes Networking Days and Befriender Training
  • All Sands face-to-face support meetings until the end of May are cancelled
  • All other events, such as fundraising or memorial events, until the end of May are cancelled, Sands will need your help to look at new ways to fundraise during this time

The charity, the staff, our volunteers and the people we support remain are our priority.

Sands is reviewing and assessing the situation on a daily basis. At the moment, the London office is closed down, and all staff are working from home. This has been a straightforward process for the charity as around 40% of staff are part or full-time homeworkers. This means that our services and the level of support we can offer you remains the same."

Petals - date updated 30/03/2020
"

Our priority is to ensure that we are protecting both the mental and physical health and wellbeing of our clients, as well as that of our counsellors.

 Petals has therefore made the decision to temporarily pause all face to face counselling sessions, with secure online video sessions (via Zoom) being offered to all existing and newly referred clients as an alternative. This will ensure that those who would like to continue (or begin) their sessions can do so in the comfort and safety of their own home whilst maintaining meaningful and visual contact with their counsellor.

 All Petals counsellors will be contacting their clients this week to offer this alternative and provide detailed guidance about how it will work. There will be no face to face sessions after Friday 20 March until further notice.

 Petals will review these arrangements on a weekly basis. We hope that we will be able to return to normal service soon, but this will always depend heavily on the very latest medical advice.

 If you are currently receiving counselling from Petals and have any questions, please contact your counsellor directly."

CPFT - date updated 14/04/2020
Where there are service changes, our teams will review each patient on an individual basis and prioritise those who need our care the most. We will be communicating directly to all patients who may be affected by these temporary changes. If they haven't heard anything they need to assume that for now things are continuing as normal, and if there are further changes, then their clinician or service will let them know. 

We're just launching our video consultations system as the majority of our appointments for patients will now be digital to adhere with the social distancing guidelines.

Eating Disorder Services:

CPFT Eating Disorder Service - date updated 14/04/2020

We will be communicating directly to all patients who may be affected by these temporary changes and advising them where they can get urgent support if needed. Face-to-face visits in the community will only be for those who require it, and others will be supported virtually through video or telephone calls. 

Where there are service changes, our teams will review each patient on an individual basis and prioritise those who need our care the most. We will be communicating directly to all patients who may be affected by these temporary changes. If they haven't heard anything they need to assume that for now things are continuing as normal, and if there are further changes, then their clinician or service will let them know. 

We're just launching our video consultations system as the majority of our appointments for patients will now be digital to adhere with the social distancing guidelines.

Carers of People with Eating Disorders and Coronavirus (COVID-19)

March 2020

Carers have a vital role in supporting their loved one’s welfare.  Support for you as a carer is also vital. 

  • Your loved one’s clinician will tell you how best to help - ask as many questions as you need to.
  • Visit the BEAT website https://www.beateatingdisorders.org.uk/ It has up to date advice and a helpline that carers can ring 365 days a year.
  • E.A.S.T https://www.feast-ed.org/ also provides useful information and online support.
  • If you have a local support group, stay in touch. Face to face meetings may not be possible but alternatives will be put in place wherever they can.
  • Make a plan now for if you become poorly - it’s not easy, talk it through with someone you trust and discuss it with your loved one. Carers UK offers good advice on making an Emergency Plan https://www.carersuk.org/help-and-advice/health/looking-after-your-health/coronavirus-covid-19, as well as more general advice.
  • Above all, look after yourself.

Here are two films to support carers made by the the NHS East of England Eating Disorders Clinical Network.  You can stream or download the films (30 mins each) by clicking on, or copying and pasting, these links:

A Carer’s Perspective:     https://player.vimeo.com/external/269177912.hd.mp4?s=8b7a5b34b34d51877cf1d4309184955b976a41f3&profile_id=175&download=1

A Professional’s Perspective:     https://player.vimeo.com/external/269159983.hd.mp4?s=3ea549895b12e5b21d3197abd8994163649e3f56&profile_id=175&download=1

Stay safe, stay well and thank you for all that you are doing.

Older People Services:

Alzheimer's Society - date updated 30/03/2020

Kathryn Smith, Chief Operating Officer at Alzheimer’s Society, says:

'We take the health and safety of all our service users, staff and volunteers very seriously.

'These are unprecedented times - Alzheimer’s Society is continually monitoring the evolving situation and following the latest Government advice with regards to our services and events.

'In light of the most recent Government issued guidance, we have made the decision to temporarily suspend all our face to face and group services with immediate effect – we are replacing these with telephone support, increasing this to ensure we support people’s well-being through isolation.'

'Clearly, it’s important to stop coronavirus spreading while we are concerned that a period of isolation could also be extremely detrimental for people living with dementia.

'We are therefore looking at how to best stay in touch and support people affected by dementia during this time and continue some of our services such as Singing for the Brain, remotely and safely, and will be communicating those plans as soon as we can. 
 
“We’re still here for anyone affected by dementia. Our Dementia Connect support line remains open on 0333 150 3456 every day and we are exploring ways we can extend the hours we’re available.

'Talking Point, our online community, where people affected by dementia can receive valuable support, can be accessed online for free, night or day, through our website.

'For up to date information on dementia and our services, please visit our website or follow us on Facebook or Twitter.'

Age UK - date updated 30/03/2020
"18th March 2020 - PLEASE NOTE We are temporarily suspending our Day Services and Friendship Clubs following Government guidelines. If you need support contact our Helpline on 0300 6669860"

Care Network Cambridgeshire - date updated 30/03/2020
"Covid-19 Update

18th March 2020
Care Network is as committed as ever to supporting local people to remain well in their homes, and in touch with their local community. The Covid-19 outbreak has had a significant impact on daily life for most people, so what this looks like will be a bit different for a while.

Our number one priority is keeping the people we support, our volunteers and staff safe, which means we have to make some changes to how we deliver services and support.

To make sure we are doing all we can in the best way possible, we have been listening to the advice from Public Health England, and having conversations with Cambridgeshire County Council, our NHS Partners and the Hospitals.

In the coming days we will provide further details of how we have adapted our community support to respond to the need that Covid-19 has created within our local communities. We will continue to be amongst and supporting local communities over the coming months, as we have been for over 30 years.

In the meantime, if you have any queries at all please do call:

  • Help at Home: 01223 714433
  • Community Navigators: 01954 212100
  • All other enquiries: 01954 211919

Susie Willis
Chief Executive Officer"

Caring Together - date updated 30/03/2020

"In light of government requests around social distancing, we have taken the difficult decision that we need to cancel all our carers hubs, groups and clubs for the time being.

We will continue to offer support to carers, focusing mainly on those who will be most impacted by these changes with an increased use of phone support, and online information and advice.

We are continuing to take referrals at this time.

We have written to our care customers to reassure them that we have a contingency plan in place in relation to the spread of coronavirus. While we cannot predict what will happen over the next few weeks and months we recognise that they may be concerned about what will happen to their care should our staff be unable to work, and how we are going to support our staff to stay well. As with all staff illness or unavailability, we will endeavour to continue to deliver our care calls as planned but may, on occasion, offer a different care worker or care team member of staff to deliver the call.

We are assessing any office or care staff returning from annual leave before they return to their duties to establish if they should return to work. We and our staff are following the Public Health England guidance, which is on the government website and the NHS website at www.nhs.uk/conditions/coronavirus-covid-19/ including about self-isolation. If self-isolation is necessary for any of our staff we will be paying them for this period of time.

We are closely monitoring and following all the updates from the government and relevant authorities that regulate and give guidance to care providers.

You can still contact us on 0345 241 0954 or hello@caringtogether.org

Please keep up to date on keeping yourself well by following the latest NHS advice at www.nhs.uk/conditions/coronavirus-covid-19/

Should any of our care customers believe they have been affected by COVID-19 and/or be self-isolating they should follow the NHS guidance as above and then contact us to let us know so we can act as appropriate to protect our staff, other clients and carers from potential infection."

The Bobby Scheme - date updated 30/03/2020

"Please be aware that due to the current very difficult circumstances and Government guidelines around Coronavirus, the Bobby Scheme will temporarily cease to operate during this period.

When Government advice changes, and it is safe to do so, the Scheme will resume.

We thank you for your understanding, and encourage everyone to be extra cautious, stay safe and consider the vulnerable members of our community.

 

CORONAVIRUS SCAMMERS – BEWARE!

Upsettingly, scammers are exploiting public fears about the Coronavirus, from fake food shoppers knocking on the doors of those with the virus (and stealing their money) to false online support which has led to losses of money and private information.

Please only accept help from known people, seek assistance from the council or refer to the support group link below. Read our CORONAVIRUS SCAM BLOG here for advice and useful links.

Find your local Coronavirus Support Group HERE.

The Bobby Scheme Team."

Cross Keys Homes - date updated 30/03/2020
"The majority of our employees are now working from home. We aim to keep all essential services running, although there will be some changes and restrictions in place.

Repairs

We will only be carrying out emergency repairs, along with gas and electricity tests, for the foreseeable future to ensure your safety. Please help us to manage the situation efficiently and only email our Repairs team on housingrepairs@crosskeyshomes.co.uk if you have an emergency repair.

If you are in the process of having planned works carried out to your home, we will continue to get these finished for you.
 

In our communities

Our cleaning service has stopped with immediate effect and our Estate Rangers service is only operating to carry out waste management clearance and emergency fire safety management.

We have closed our community hubs in Westwood, South Bretton and Welland, and ceased all community activities, Work Clubs and training courses for the foreseeable future. The WestRaven Big Local café in Westwood is also closed.

Activities on our Retirement Housing and Extra Care schemes have been cancelled and we have closed all communal facilities at all our schemes and both our restaurants at Lapwing Apartments and Kingfisher Court. Members of the public are asked not to visit unless it is absolutely necessary. This is to protect our older residents who may be more vulnerable to the virus. Please be assured, we are checking on all our residents and will ensure everyone gets the supplies and help they need.
 

Visiting us

All our offices are closed. We request that you contact us instead by email or by using our website Live Chat service wherever possible.
 

Contacting us

To contact our Customer Services team, email: customerservices@crosskeyshomes.co.uk

To speak to us about your rent, email: incomemanagement@crosskeyshomes.co.uk

To report an emergency repair only, email: housingrepairs@crosskeyshomes.co.uk

You can also contact us on our website from Monday to Friday, 9am to 5pm, by using our Live Chat service.
 

Payments

We know it is difficult at the moment, but you do need to continue to pay your rent and/or service charge. Given we are all trying to limit contact and stop the spread of this virus the best way is to use our automated process. You can pay via our automated payment line, 24 hours a day, on 0330 088 3786 or through the MyCKH portal.

If your employment status has changed or you need to talk to us about your rent, please email incomemanagement@crosskeyshomes.co.uk. Our teams will still be here for you.
 

Care and LifeLine

Our Care and LifeLine service will remain operational, and we are putting in additional precautions to protect our employees and customers. We all have a part to play in slowing down the spread of this virus and protecting the most vulnerable in our communities. 
 

If you are self-isolating over concerns about COVID-19 (coronavirus), please let us know by emailing customerservices@crosskeyshomes.co.uk. This is extremely important if we are due to visit your home.


Suppliers to CKH

We would be grateful if all our suppliers could send invoices and communications regarding payments via email to accounts.payable@crosskeyshomes.co.uk. This will ensure we are able to continue to offer a prompt payment service.
 

Please be patient with us, and remember our teams are doing their very best in unprecedented circumstances.

We would also ask you to also look out for friends and neighbours and support them in whatever way you can, whilst also keeping them safe. We need to pull together and tackle this as one community.

We will be updating this page regularly, so please keep checking back. We will also be updating our Facebook page regularly, so please do follow us on there.

Further information on the government’s advice on staying safe, along with the symptoms to look out for and advice on what to do if you have symptoms, can be found on the government’s website here."

Forever Active - date updated 30/03/2020
"Following the Prime Minister’s briefing on 16th March the Forever Active management committee has reluctantly had to take the decision, in support of social distancing, to cancel all classes as from Wednesday 18th March until further notice. Please refer to the website for further updates and information.

Your help in passing this information on to others in your class who may not have access to emails would be very helpful.

Thank you for your support"

Sanctuary Supported Living - date updated 30/03/2020
"In response to Government guidelines following the COVID-19 outbreak, we have reviewed our services to customers and have had to make some difficult decisions.

We want to continue to offer safe and effective services, but we also want to protect our residents and our staff by minimising non-essential contact and travel.

Therefore, we have taken the decision to move to an emergency repairs service only if we have to enter you home.

Compliance checks, such as Gas Safety; and communal repairs will continue the usual way. We understand this is disappointing for you and may mean that some non-essential repairs take much longer to complete than in ordinary circumstances.

We have streamlined our schedules for care and support. This means that some key working sessions may not take place as regularly and the number and length of time spent on care visits will be reduced to accommodate everyone’s essential needs without compromising anyone’s health or wellbeing. This has been done according to our risk assessments, business continuity plans and guidelines received from the authorities.  

We will of course, continue to monitor the situation daily and review accordingly."

Making Space - date updated 30/03/2020
"

We want to reassure you that whilst we are doing our best to keep life as normal as possible for the people we support, we are also taking additional measures, following the advice of Public Health England, to ensure people’s safety.

Here at Making Space, our first priority is always the people we support, their family and carers and our colleagues.

Our teams are already well versed in infection control and we have clear processes in place to prevent and contain infections amongst the people we support and our teams. However, we are not complacent about the coronavirus outbreak, or the potential risks.

Visiting our residential care homes/services and registered services

We currently do not intend to close our services to visitors - contact with loved ones is such an important element in people’s lives and where we can we should not isolate them unnecessarily.

However, to greatly support our efforts to protect the people we support we have put in place some restrictions on visitation and ask that careful consideration is given before visiting.

Please delay your visit to our services if:

  • You feel unwell. This is especially important if you have a fever, a cough, shortness of breath, high temperature or other flu like symptoms. Please visit the NHS website for the full list of coronavirus symptoms, you can also check if you have Coronavirus symptons using NHS 111 Online. If you do have these symptoms, following Public Health guidelines, you should also be self-isolating for 14 days
  • You have recently returned from any country on the government’s high-risk list, please avoid all visits until further notice. Check Gov.UK’s list.
  • Have come into contact with any one potentially having the virus i.e. anyone already quarantined
  • Your visit is non-essential

Our teams our always on hand to assist with telephone/video calls, letter or email communications so you can stay connected. Please contact the service manager to discuss how we can help facilitate this for you, or if we can help in any other way.

Visits from local services that would usually form part of our social activity schedule have been cancelled for the foreseeable future. However, socialisation will continue to be an important aspect of daily life, with our teams ensuring that people have as much social interaction and entertainment as possible.

Essential medical visits will continue to be made, and our staff will ensure that any visitors that do visit are aware of interim visiting requirements.

If you decide to visit

Having considered the above information, if you are still planning a visit, it is important that you take every measure to do so safely.

During your visit:

  • The most effective way of preventing transmission is to wash your hands with soap and water and we ask that all visitors do so as soon as they enter the service. You can read more about NHS handwashing advice
  • We also recommend using hand sanitiser with at least a 60% alcohol content and to do this before entering the home, especially after using public transport
  • Please cover your mouth and nose with a tissue or your sleeve (not your hands) when you cough or sneeze and put used tissues in the bin immediately
  • Our teams may ask you questions about your health and any contact with possible sources of the coronavirus before you come into the service/home

Reducing the risk

Our teams are closely observing residents for respiratory symptoms including elevated temperatures and are fully aware of the protocol they should follow should they suspect a case.

We are confident that our colleagues have the knowledge, skills and resources to minimise the risk that coronavirus presents to our residents.

Community and outreach services

We are working closely with our community services and other local providers to continue providing support in the community wherever possible, following the latest guidance from Public Health England.

Although we have had to scale back our face-to-face support, we can still support you in various different ways, including:

  • Welfare telephone calls/checks
  • Emotional support over the phone
  • Support with errands
  • Help co-ordinating medical support

Support available will vary from service to service depending on different circumstance - so please speak with your service manager/team leader directly.

How to stop coronavirus spreading

Everyone must stay at home to help stop the spread of coronavirus.

You should only leave the house for 1 of 4 reasons:

  • Shopping for basic necessities
  • One form of exercise a day, for example a run, walk, or cycle – alone or with members of your household
  • Any medical need, or to provide care or to help a vulnerable person
  • Travelling to and from work, but only where this cannot be done from home

There are things you can do to help reduce the risk of you and anyone you live with getting ill with coronavirus:

Do

  • Wash your hands with soap and water often – do this for at least 20 seconds
  • Use hand sanitiser gel if soap and water are not available
  • Wash your hands as soon as you get back home
  • Cover your mouth and nose with a tissue or your sleeve (not your hands) when you cough or sneeze
  • Put used tissues in the bin immediately and wash your hands afterwards

Don't

  • Do not touch your eyes, nose or mouth if your hands are not clean

Keeping you up to date

We will continue to monitor all government advice and update our approach in accordance with the latest recommendations. Please do check this page regularly as it will be updated to reflect any development or change to our guidance."

CPFT - date updated 30/03/2020
"24 March 2020: 
  • In line with national guidance to stay at home, CPFT wards and inpatient units will be allowing visitors only in exceptional circumstances to meet patient needs.

  • Carers and families should call ahead to book a visit in advance, and this must be agreed with the ward/service manager.

  • Visitors may be expected to wear protective clothing, and anyone who has not been given permission to visit will be asked to leave the site.

  • All visitors must comply with hand-washing instructions whilst on the ward.

  • If you have Coronavirus symptoms, you must not enter any CPFT site/building. If staff members suspect you may have symptoms, you will be asked to leave the ward."

Self-Harm Services:

Samaritans - date updated 30/03/2020

Helpline still running.

"Samaritans is a critical service, needed now more than ever. In light of latest government advice, our volunteers are working really, really hard to support the people who need us most wherever possible. Our volunteers' safety is of upmost importance and we will continue to monitor the situation. All our branches are applying strict guidelines with regard to hygiene standards and social distancing.

While we've taken the difficult decision to stop offering face to face support in our branches, and training sessions for new volunteers, and it may take us longer to answer the phone or answer emails, we're still here.

Government guidance to stay at home over the next few weeks means that we won't have the social contact that some of us are used to, and in some cases, if you live alone or are in self-isolation, it will mean we're cut off from all contact for quite some time.

It’s normal that this will affect your mood, and it’s something we’d really encourage you to talk about, however you can, via video messaging, over the phone, texting or over the garden fence. Whilst we are physically isolated, it’s more important than ever for us to feel socially connected, so try and reach out to people to talk, and try to be there to listen to others."

CHUMS - date updated 30/03/2020
"Following guidance from Public Health England and the Government, all face-to-face contacts with children, young people and families will cease from 5pm on Wednesday 18th March, for the foreseeable future to minimise exposure and unnecessary risk.

CHUMS will continue to operate and maintain our services and will endeavour to minimise any disruption to the care we provide.

We will now be offering our interventions using the following methods:

  • Telephone assessments
  • Individual interventions by phone, WhatsApp, Facetime or Skype
  • Group interventions using Microsoft Teams. 
  • Virtual drop-ins

Initial contact will be made by phone and the most convenient method of communication can then be decided. 

If you have an existing referral with CHUMS or you are about to make a new referral, we will contact you as soon as possible. 

If there is a change in circumstance or an escalation of your presenting issue that requires emergency attention, please contact your GP, call 111 or contact A&E. 

We can assure you that we are doing everything possible to continue to deliver a high standard of service and appreciate your patience during this challenging time. 

If you have any questions don’t hesitate to get in touch with our support team."

Sexual and Domestic Abuse services:

Muslim Women's Network UK - date updated 30/03/2020
"Given the outbreak of Coronavirus (Covid-19) we wanted to reassure you that the MWN Helpline is still available to provide information, advice and support.

Whilst our contingency plan allows us to continue receiving calls, it may be easier and quicker to contact us via email, webchat or text.

We look forward to connecting with you."

Women's Aid - date updated 30/03/2020
"

Some local support services in the community may be temporarily suspended. This will mean that some survivors will feel particularly isolated.

If you were accessing counselling that has now been suspended; some counselling services can continue to provide helpline support. For example, Supportline provide a confidential telephone helpline and email counselling service. Particularly to those at risk of abuse or are isolated: www.supportline.org.uk

Women’s Aid is continuing to provide the following services:

The Survivors’ Forum is an online resource for survivors of domestic abuse. The Survivors’ forum can be accessed 24/7. This is a place where survivors can support each other and share their experiences.

Women’s Aid Live Chat is currently available Monday to Friday 10- 12pm. This could be a safer way to access some support; particularly if an abuser might also be in the property so it would be unsafe to make a telephone call.

Women’s Aid Email Service is still operating and can also provide support.

For detailed information about national and local support services go to: https://www.womensaid.org.uk/information-support/

For details of helplines, go to: www.gov.uk/report-domestic-abuse

At Women’s Aid we would always want to encourage a survivor to be as safe as possible when accessing any form of support. It will be really important to familiarise yourself with information and guidance that will help to keep you as safe as possible when using online platforms: https://www.womensaid.org.uk/cover-your-tracks-online/

Looking after children can be particularly difficult challenging when isolating. Family lives have support available including online forums: https://www.familylives.org.uk/"

Cambridge Rape Crisis Centre - date updated 30/03/2020
"TEMPORARY HELPLINE SUSPENSION (26 March 2020): Unfortunately we are unable to open our helpline this evening as, in response to the COVID-19 (coronavirus) pandemic, we are installing a new phone system. Our email support service remains open. For more details, click here.

In such challenging times, our number one priority is to continue to provide our vital specialist support services to survivors of sexual violence whilst ensuring their health, safety and well-being and that of our staff and volunteers.

To do this, we are keeping up to date with, and following, Government guidance around infection control and adapting our services accordingly.

All our services are operating, and we are receiving and responding to all referrals in the usual way, we have just had to make a few changes to keep everyone safe and well:

  • Our helpline and email support services remain open as usual.
  • Our advocacy services (ISVA/ChISVA) and counselling services are also working as normal but face-to-face services are now being offered over the phone or online.

As we adapt to continue to provide our services, we will also continue to ensure complete confidentially (and anonymity, in the case of helpline and email support) and that all records are kept safely and securely.

We recognise that we might need to modify, restrict or temporarily suspend some services should national advice change but will ensure we communicate these changes as soon as possible both to service users and the general public.

All work from the CRCC office is now suspended and the team will work remotely. Our administrative and day-to-day work will carry on as usual – emails will be responded to and calls answered, although we encourage you to email us in the first instance. Our office working hours will be broadly the same – Monday to Friday, 9am to 5pm – and you can contact us as follows:

Advocacy services (ISVA/ChISVA) – isva@cambridgerapecrisis.org.uk
Counselling services – counselling@cambridgerapecrisis.org.uk
Fundraising and donations – fundraising@cambridgerapecrisis.org.uk
General enquiries – contact@cambridgerapecrisis.org.uk

All our fundraising events and activities have been postponed until a time when we can all enjoy them safely.

To keep up to date with information, support and developments please visit our website and follow us on Twitter and Facebook.

We want to reassure survivors of rape, child sexual abuse and all forms of sexual violence that we are still here, and you are not alone.

Thank you for your understanding and support.

Norah Al-Ani
Director"

Peterborough Rape Crisis Care Group - date updated 30/03/2020
"Peterborough Rape Crisis understand the real potential for the current situation with COVID-19 to cause anxiety and concern for many, not least of all those processing trauma and living with the impacts of sexual violence and abuse. Ensuring the health, safety and well-being of our staff, volunteers and the survivors we support is our number one priority.

Following the ongoing developments of the Covid-19 virus and guidance from the Government, Peterborough Rape Crisis have had to make the very difficult decision to suspend work from our offices for the foreseeable future. These measures mean that all our staff will be working in confidential spaces from home, using their emails and mobiles to keep in touch with those currently accessing our services. Please be assured that we have the highest level of security and encryption on our cloud-based platforms and will continue to ensure records and data are kept in line with General Data Protection Regulations.

Some key points of information:

  • Our specialist volunteers are currently unable to provide our Helpline service, however we are working hard to introduce our cloud-based telephone system as soon as possible
  • Online referrals through our website can continue to be made for those needing to access our Independent Sexual Violence Advocacy service however we would appreciate your patience as it may take longer than usual for us to respond
  • Our generic email address will continue to be monitored but again, please bear with us as it may take us a little longer to respond to your queries. This email address is admin@prccg.org.uk
  • The RCEW Live Chat helpline is currently available as usual www.rapecrisis.org.uk/get-help/live-chat-helpline/
  • There are also a range of self-help resources available on our website for those who would like them https://www.prccg.org.uk/information-and-resources/

Whatever happens, we want victims and survivors of rape, child sexual abuse and all forms of sexual violence to know that we are still here, and you are not alone.

Thank you for your patience and understanding.

Jacqui Campey
CEO
Peterborough Rape Crisis Care Group"

Respect YMCA - date updated 30/03/2020
"

We understand that these are particularly challenging times for everyone, and particularly schools.

The mental health and wellbeing of your staff, students and parents will be critical during this current climate, and at a time where social distancing will create a barrier to the typical support and guidance schools will provide to their students.

YMCA Trinity Group is one of the region’s leading mental health and wellbeing support charities, and we aim to be there for every person in the community; supporting young people, schools and their families through difficult times with a wide range of programmes and services.

We are here to help you and your school community during this difficult time. As well as our counselling support, advice and training, we wanted to draw your attention to a digital tool that may be of particular benefit at this time.

 

Thrive App

 

This is a 24/7 self-help tool for your students (11+), staff and parents to prevent, detect and support mental health & well-being.

Thrive is the only NHS approved app for the prevention, detection and self-management of common mental health conditions.

It promotes:

  • resilience
  • detects conditions before they become too severe
  • improves recovery rates
  • signposts for further support
  • provides in-app treatment
  • reports usage data to settings and much more

 YMCA Trinity Group has partnered with Thrive Therapeutic Software to offer schools a proven and cost-effective solution to support the mental health and wellbeing of their staff, students and parents.

Through the YMCA Trinity Group charitable partnership, schools can access either the student or staff/parent app at a significant discount starting at just £2 per user per year.

We have also managed to secure a special 30% discount for schools purchasing apps for their whole student population (aged 11+).

Talk to our Mental Health team to discuss how we can support your school by calling 01733 373187 or emailing lisa.smith@ymcatrinity.org.uk.

PTSD Services:

Combat Stress - date updated 31/03/2020

We continue to do everything we can to support veterans during this difficult time. We have followed the Government’s advice and closed our treatment centres, but we continue to provide mental health support in a variety of ways:

  • Our therapists across the country have moved from face-to-face appointments to phone or video call appointments so veterans can continue to receive our specialist support
  • Our Peer Support Service continues as a virtual service via phone and video call.
  • We host webinars to help and support partners – we plan for these to continue. 
  • We are seeking ways to extend our Art Therapy online.
  • Our 24-hour Helpline (0800 138 1619) remains open, providing confidential advice and support to veterans and their families. 
  • We are also posting regular updates to help reduce anxiety and maintain positive mental health on our website and social media channels. You can find all our new resources online here.
  • And finally – any veterans currently receiving our support can also contact their usual clinical team member for more help and advice via their usual email address or telephone number.

https://www.combatstress.org.uk/veteran-support-during-covid-19

INSIGHT- date updated 31/03/2020

We’ve been closely following the developing situation of the COVID-19 (coronavirus) pandemic and adapting to the guidelines provided by the UK Government and the NHS.To keep our clients and team members safe, we have implemented the following across all our talking therapy services, from Monday 30 March 2020 until further notice:

  • If you would like to make a referral to one of our talking therapy services, we encourage you to use our online self-referral forms.
  • We are no longer able to answer direct calls to our services, but we will are checking voicemail messages every 30 minutes during open hours and will respond to any messages directly (this excludes Access Sefton and Talking Helps Newcastle, which will continue to take phone calls).
  • All our assessments are now taking place over the phone.
  • All our therapy sessions will take place over the phone or via Skype.
  • Group therapy sessions have been paused.

We would like to thank you for your support and understanding as we continue to navigate these challenging and uncertain times. We will keep this page updated with any changes to our guidance or service details

https://www.insighthealthcare.org/our-services/talking-therapies/safety-measures-during-covid-19-outbreak/

Drug/Alcohol Abuse Treatment Services:

CPFT - CASUS (Cambridgeshire Child and Adolescent Substance Use Service) - date updated 14/04/2020

We will be communicating directly to all patients who may be affected by these temporary changes and advising them where they can get urgent support if needed. Face-to-face visits in the community will only be for those who require it, and others will be supported virtually through video or telephone calls. 

CASUS (Child and adolescent substance use service) – New routine referrals to the service have been temporarily paused to prioritise those with high level needs.

Sanctuary - date updated 31/03/2020
We are still providing our Sanctuary out-of-hours crisis support (over the telephone) in conjunction with the NHS First Response Service (111, Option 2).

CGL Cambridgeshire- date updated 31/03/2020

The way you get support from us might be different for a while, but we are still here. We’ll do everything we can to help you stay safe.
Prescription - Your keyworker will be in touch with you about your prescription.
Opening times - Our opening times are changing. We'll now be open from 9:30 - 16:30 from Monday to Friday. We aren't able to open on a Saturday at the moment. Please don't come to our office unless it's absolutely necessary.
Groups - We're sorry to say that our groups aren't going to be running for a while.
New people - We are still open to new people. Please phone us on 0300 5550101 so we can arrange a telephone assessment.
Social media - We will be posting helpful information and advice on social media. Make sure you follow us on Facebook and Twitter.
If you're worried about something, please get in touch. You can contact us during normal hours on 0300 5550101 - please choose option 1. Or you can email us on cambridgeshirereferrals@cgl.org.uk

We are planning to keep our needle exchanges open, but please call before you come.

CGL - https://www.changegrowlive.org/advice-info/coronavirus

AA Meetings- date updated 31/03/2020

The Government continues to re-iterate the clear message that we must stay at home to protect ourselves, our loved ones, the NHS and those around us.
They have suggested to us through Public Health England (PHE) that: Only in exceptional circumstances should an individual sponsor visit a sponsee to provide 1:1 support at home. They should both then follow the same precautions as are required of essential services i.e. stay at least 2m apart in an adequately ventilated area, both wash hands, don't go if either party is showing any symptoms of the virus, don't visit people who are self-isolating because they have COVID 19 symptoms, do not visit those who are being shielded because they are highly vulnerable or if the sponsor themselves is from a vulnerable group.

It is good to know that our work with PHE is recognised in their concern for our wellbeing and their understanding of how we work.

More information at: https://www.alcoholics-anonymous.org.uk/Members/Coronavirus-News

Alcohol Change UK- date updated 31/03/2020

If you would like to talk to someone about your drinking, support is available. Following current Government advice, a number of organisations have set up support online or by phone.
The Alcoholics Anonymous helpline is open 24/7 on 0800 9177 650. If you would prefer, you can also email them at help@aamail.org or live chat via their website at www.alcoholics-anonymous.org.uk.
Drinkline, a free, confidential helpline for people who are concerned about their drinking, or someone else's. Call 0300 123 1110 (weekdays 9am–8pm, weekends 11am–4pm).
You can join a SMART Recovery meeting online here.
We Are With You offers a free confidential online chat service. Available: weekdays - between 10am-4pm and 6pm-9pm; and on weekends: 11am-4pm.

More information is available at: https://alcoholchange.org.uk/help-and-support/get-help-now/coronavirus-information-and-advice-hub/coronavirus-getting-support

Al-Anon Family Groups- date updated 31/03/2020

Given the recent outbreak of Coronavirus (COVID-19) we wanted to reassure you that Al-Anon Family Groups is still available to provide support to anyone whose life is, or has been, affected by someone else’s drinking. Whilst we do have a contingency plan in place there may be times when the Helpline is covered by a limited number of volunteers so please bear with us while we try to answer your call. We suggest anyone wishing to attend a meeting calls the Helpline to request a group contact.

A printable copy of the contingency plan is available for Al-Anon members on the members’ section. Or via this link: https://www.al-anonuk.org.uk/workspace/uploads/attachments/contingency-plan-pandemic-covid-19-coronavirus_1.pdf

Talk to Frank- date updated 31/03/2020

https://www.talktofrank.com/news/coronavirus

Drinkaware- date updated 31/03/2020

If you’re worried about alcohol and isolation due to coronavirus, or concerned about someone else, we’re here to support you with key information and tips for looking after your mental health.

https://www.drinkaware.co.uk/alcohol-facts/drinking-habits-and-behaviours/alcohol-and-coronavirus/

Adfam- date updated 31/03/2020

Support for friends and families affected by someone’s substance misuse is even more necessary at this difficult time. Adfam is continuing to provide support through our website where you will find information about a wide range of topics related to substances and families, and how you can receive support for yourself, and an online forum where you can share your story with others.

https://adfam.org.uk/our-work/news-and-events/news/958

Recovery Cafe's - date updated 31/03/2020
The Edge Café - Following recent government advice in respect of Covid-19, it is with a heavy heart that we have taken the decision to close the Cafe for all groups and food for the safety of our customers, staff and volunteers.
We will reopen as soon as we can. We value your custom and friendship.
We will however be open daily between 12-2 for fareshare.
https://www.theedgecafecambridge.org/
Frazzled Café – Register to attend an online frazzled café meeting. https://www.frazzledcafe.org/virtual

Pregnancy Services :

Tommy's - date updated 01/04/2020

Pregnancy and coronavirus: information for pregnant women and new mums. The Royal College of Obstetricians & Gynaecologists has released official guidelines to outline information for pregnant women and new mums surrounding the recent outbreak of coronavirus (COVID-19). Try not to worry and follow any advice in these guidelines. We are updating this page as new information is published.

 https://www.tommys.org/pregnancy-information/im-pregnant/pregnancy-news-and-blogs/pregnancy-and-coronavirus-information-pregnant-women-and-new-mums

Sands- date updated 01/04/2020

All Sands events until the end of May are now cancelled, this includes Networking Days and Befriender Training.
All Sands face-to-face support meetings until the end of May are cancelled.
All other events, such as fundraising or memorial events, until the end of May are cancelled, Sands will need your help to look at new ways to fundraise during this time

Much more information at - https://www.sands.org.uk/coronavirus

Petals - date updated 01/04/2020

Our priority is to ensure that we are protecting both the mental and physical health and wellbeing of our clients, as well as that of our counsellors.
Petals has therefore made the decision to temporarily pause all face to face counselling sessions, with secure online video sessions (via Zoom) being offered to all existing and newly referred clients as an alternative. This will ensure that those who would like to continue (or begin) their sessions can do so in the comfort and safety of their own home whilst maintaining meaningful and visual contact with their counsellor.
All Petals counsellors will be contacting their clients this week to offer this alternative and provide detailed guidance about how it will work. There will be no face to face sessions after Friday 20 March until further notice.
Petals will review these arrangements on a weekly basis. We hope that we will be able to return to normal service soon, but this will always depend heavily on the very latest medical advice. If you are currently receiving counselling from Petals and have any questions, please contact your counsellor directly.

https://petalscharity.org/covid19/

CPSL MIND - date updated 01/04/2020

It is with regret that we have to announce the temporary suspension of our community-based services – namely our Good Mood cafes, Open Door calm spaces, Peer Support Groups and Perinatal Groups – until further notice.
Our Changing Lives Counselling Service has also been temporarily suspended and we will be unable to accept new referrals at this time. Our Cognitive Behavioural Therapy service will continue but as a telephone-based service instead of face-to-face. All individuals affected will be contacted directly. https://www.cpslmind.org.uk/temporary-suspension-of-cpsl-mind-services/

https://www.mind.org.uk/information-support/coronavirus-and-your-wellbeing/

Isolation Services :

Citizens Advice Bureau - date updated 01/04/2020
This page is regularly updated as government advice becomes available. There are things you can do to help you avoid getting coronavirus, also known as COVID-19. There are also things you can do to stop the virus spreading if you think you have it. https://www.citizensadvice.org.uk/health/coronavirus-what-it-means-for-you/

Consonant -- date updated 01/04/2020

Our Offices are CLOSED temporarily. ALL staff are all working remotely and can still be contacted Please email: hello@consonant.org.uk or call 0207 354 9631.

https://consonant.org.uk/cororona-virus-update/

WinterComfort - date updated 01/04/2020

Important update: It’s with very heavy hearts that on Wednesday 25th March we had to close WinterComfort for the foreseeable future as a result of COVID-19. This was needed to protect our service users and staff team collectively. We will be maintaining contact with our service user by phone and email. Please do not phone WinterComfort unless you are homeless and in need of support. Please email us with any offers of help or support info@wintercomfort.org.uk due to staff shortages we may take a few days to respond.

We have working very hard with our partners, including Cambridge City Council, to verify all rough sleepers. In the coming days accommodation will be provided for ALL verified rough sleepers, in temporary accommodation, supplied with food and not left on the streets, funded by the council. All our service users were given food vouchers, toiletries and equipped with mobile phones to ensure they are contactable.

https://wintercomfort.org.uk/news/wintercomfort-service-change-in-response-to-cv19

Work Routes - date updated 01/04/2020

Our offices are shutting due to coronavirus. However, our services support for you are still continuing. Our advisers will be arranging phone calls instead of face to face meetings to continue providing support on our programme.

https://workroutes.co.uk/

Tempo - date updated 01/04/2020

As a result of COVID-19, many organisations are adapting their working arrangements to protect their staff and slow the spread of Coronavirus. As of this week all Tempo staff will be working virtually from home for the time being as a precautionary measure.

You can still reach out to us as usual by phone on 02920 566132 or via email at support@timecredits.com.

We understand that this can be an anxious time for many, and strongly encourage everyone to take all possible precautionary measures to ensure the safety of yourself and others. For further information on social distancing guidance and general updates, please refer to the government’s website here.

We have seen many local mutual aid and support groups pop up on social media sites that may be helpful to those in need, or if you are able to give support, and please be sure to keep in mind those that may not have access to social media sites whilst also observing sensible social distancing measures.

Thank you for your continued support. https://www.wearetempo.org/

Cambridge Ethnic Community Forum - date updated 01/04/2020

Due to the current health crisis we are having to adjust how we deliver our services. Accordingly until further notice there will be no office drop in or outreach.
Priority clients and urgent cases for our services may be seen. But by appointment only.
We will be looking to assist and support otherwise through telephone, email or messaging services. If you require assistance please still contact us on 01223 655241 or drop an email to CecfEnquiries@cecf.co.uk
Please note that we may not respond immediately however messages will be checked on a regular basis.
Please also note that our services maybe subject to further change.
We will update as and when this occurs. See our CECF Facebook page for information on the Coronavirus in 20 different languages, in addition to community help for those who are more isolated. Regarding our community group advice surgeries, workshops and training sessions.
We will be looking at how they can be delivered over the coming weeks. We know you are very concerned, and we will do our best to support you through this difficult time.

http://www.cecf.co.uk/joomla2/

Cambridge City Customer Services - date updated 01/04/2020
https://www.cambridge.gov.uk/updates/2020/03/18/coronavirus-changes-to-our-services

Richmond Fellowship - date updated 01/04/2020

As a mental health and recovery focussed group of charities, we know how vital it is for people to look after their mental health during the current coronavirus pandemic.

We’ve put robust measures and contingency plans in place at both national and local level to ensure the safety and wellbeing of all staff and people we support during this time of uncertainty.

As of Monday 23 March, all our mental health services remain operational across England, but we are anticipating some disruption to our services over the coming weeks. We’re reviewing the situation on a constant basis in line with government advice and will publish any updates on our website accordingly.

https://www.richmondfellowship.org.uk/category/coronavirus/

Vivacity - date updated 01/04/2020

Sadly, the Key Theatre is closed until further notice.

All of our gyms and leisure centres closed on 20.03.20 until further notice. To our valued customers: Following the latest government guidelines relating to Coronavirus, we have sadly closed all of our gyms, pools and leisure centres and related services until further notice. All memberships have been suspended with immediate effect. No further payments will be taken.

Sadly, Peterborough Museum is closed.  We will publish updates here as soon as we have them. If you have an event booking with us, we are working hard to reschedule events and contact customers. Thank you for your patience at this time.
Long Thorpe Tower is closed.
Flag Fen will delay opening until later in the year.

Following the latest government guidelines relating to Coronavirus, we have sadly closed all of our gyms, pools and leisure centres and related services until further notice.
Club Viva childcare has closed until further notice, this includes holiday provision.

Our Swim Academy classes are cancelled until further notice.
To our valued customers: We are following the latest government advice relating to Coronavirus and sadly we have closed all of our gyms, pools and leisure centres and related services such as Swim Academy. All memberships etc have been suspended with immediate effect. No further payments will be taken.

In line with the latest Government guidance, we have regretfully closed our library services until further notice.  All related services are suspended until further notice, including the request service.
If you have overdue library books at home, please do not worry about trying to return them (all libraries are closed).  There will be no fines for late returns during this time.

We are very disappointed to announce our children’s soft play and activity centre at Serpentine Green is closed until further notice due to the interactive nature of the activities that are on site.

https://vivacity.org/faqs-covid-19-coronavirus/

Light Project Peterborough - date updated 01/04/2020

https://www.lightprojectpeterborough.org.uk/coronavirus-and-light-project-peterborough/

Groundwork East - date updated 01/04/2020

It is inevitable that some of our programmes and activities will be cancelled or postponed to help prevent the spread of the virus. We will notify participants directly as soon as possible and use our website and social media channels to provide up to date information.
We are working with partners, funders and other organisations to explore how we can make the best use of the resources at our disposal to support vulnerable members of our community through this challenging time.

https://www.groundwork.org.uk/covid-19-statement/

Anxiety, Depression and Stress Services :

CPSL MIND - date updated 01/04/2020

We are here for you and you can still call us on our central number 0300 303 4363 or email us at enquiries@cpslmind.org.uk .

We are currently working hard – alongside partner organisations – to find new ways of providing support and connecting people during this Lockdown period.

Please keep checking in with our coronavirus response page and social media channels for the latest details and updates for our services.

The page also includes details of local and national help and support during this time – including Keep Your Head which provides details of services across Cambridgeshire and Peterborough.

If you are experiencing a mental health crisis, please call the NHS First Response Service on 111, Option 2. Our Sanctuaries are still providing support (over the telephone) as part of the this service – and will continue to do so. You can find additional helplines here.

https://www.cpslmind.org.uk/wellbeing-and-mental-health-we-are-still-here-for-you/

GoodLife Service - date updated 01/04/2020

Our Good Life team continue to provide one to one support to our specialist mental health service clients in a variety of ways.

Our online Good Life service ‘Qwell’, provided by our partner Xenzone, will go live as from 1 April 2020. More information will be available on this shortly.

Our 0300 303 4363 number remains open from 9.30am to 5.30pm, Mon-Fri (except Bank Holidays) as normal.

Our Changing Lives Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT) service continues via telephone.

While our counselling service remains on pause temporarily, this is currently under review.

Although our Good Mood cafes, Open Door calm spaces and Peer Support Groups are currently closed, we are looking at ways to re-introduce some of our Good Life community initiatives virtually, online as soon as possible.

https://www.cpslmind.org.uk/our-response/

CPFT Psychological Wellbeing Service - date updated 01/04/2020

Due to the COVID-19 outbreak the service is operating at reduced capacity. This means there may be an extended delay in processing your referral and organising an assessment.

It is important that we do everything we can to ensure your safety and that of our own staff.  Therefore, we have made the decision to stop face to face appointments.  However, our operation is likely to be very reduced during this period.  In some instances, we may be able to use phone, Teams, Skype and Instant Messenger services, depending on therapist access to these methods.

Please let us know if you are happy to conduct your appointment over the phone.  Provided your therapist is fit and well, we will endeavour to continue your treatment at this point in time, but we are constantly reviewing the situation as we may need to support the trust emergency services over the coming weeks.

https://www.cpft.nhs.uk/services/pws/covid-19-information.htm

Cogwheel Trust - date updated 01/04/2020

The telephone line of the Cogwheel Trust is now closed due to the coronavirus, also known as COVID-19 outbreak. The charity can be contacted via email at admin@cogwheel.org.uk.

Counselling services & coronavirus- The coronavirus spread is having and will continue to have an impact on all parts of society and this includes the Cogwheel Trust.

It is therefore with regret that Cogwheel is unable to accept any new clients at the present time or indeed start counselling for those on the present waiting list whilst the current emergency continues.

The charity does hope to be in a position to resume its normal counselling service when the current emergency has abated, and it is safe to resume the service.

If you would like us to contact you when the charity is in a position to provide counselling to new clients please email admin@cogwheel.org.uk. We must advise that this could be quite a number of months away.

https://www.cogwheel.org.uk/

Arts and Minds - date updated 01/04/2020

Unfortunately we are not currently running any face-2-face creative activities, however, we are working on development of a virtual / postal programme of activities #CreativeConnections. Please follow us on Twitter / Facebook / LinkedIn – where we’ll be sharing all sorts of activities to keep you connected & creative.

http://artsandminds.org.uk/

INSIGHT - date updated 01/04/2020

We’ve been closely following the developing situation of the COVID-19 (coronavirus) pandemic and adapting to the guidelines provided by the UK Government and the NHS. To keep our clients and team members safe, we have implemented the following across all our talking therapy services, from Monday 30 March 2020 until further notice:

  • If you would like to make a referral to one of our talking therapy services, we encourage you to use our online self-referral forms.
  • We are no longer able to answer direct calls to our services, but we will are checking voicemail messages every 30 minutes during open hours and will respond to any messages directly (this excludes Access Sefton and Talking Helps Newcastle, which will continue to take phone calls).
  • All our assessments are now taking place over the phone.
  • All our therapy sessions will take place over the phone or via Skype.
  • Group therapy sessions have been paused.

We would like to thank you for your support and understanding as we continue to navigate these challenging and uncertain times. We will keep this page updated with any changes to our guidance or service details

https://www.insighthealthcare.org/our-services/talking-therapies/safety-measures-during-covid-19-outbreak/

Cameo CPFT - date updated 14/04/2020

We will be communicating directly to all patients who may be affected by these temporary changes and advising them where they can get urgent support if needed. Face-to-face visits in the community will only be for those who require it, and others will be supported virtually through video or telephone calls. 

Lifecraft - date updated 01/04/2020

We are currently able to continue running Lifeline for anyone living in Cambridgeshire and Peterborough, as well as our counselling and suicide bereavement support services for existing clients.  Most support is now being provided via telephone and video calls.

Following Government guidance the following groups will not take place in Cambridge or Newmarket until Wednesday 17 June:

– Art Group

– Craft for Smiles

– Resilience Group

– Meditation and Mindfulness

– Social Clubs

– Hearing Voices Group

Member applications will be processed once the groups are re-opened.

We will be updating members regularly throughout this time.

https://lifecraft.org.uk/coronavirus-update/

Cambridgeshire Consultancy in Counselling - date updated 01/04/2020

If you feel you would benefit from counselling, CCC will be offering as much remote counselling as possible during periods of isolation.  Contact your nearest reception to find out if this would be an appropriate option for you. Peterborough: 01733 553166     Hunts and Cambs:01223 233047

http://www.cambridgeshirecounselling.org.uk/22-top-articles-for-individuals/170-coronavirus-how-to-protect-your-mental-health

Richmond Fellowship - date updated 01/04/2020

As a mental health and recovery focussed group of charities, we know how vital it is for people to look after their mental health during the current coronavirus pandemic.

We’ve put robust measures and contingency plans in place at both national and local level to ensure the safety and wellbeing of all staff and people we support during this time of uncertainty.

As of Monday 23 March, all our mental health services remain operational across England, but we are anticipating some disruption to our services over the coming weeks. We’re reviewing the situation on a constant basis in line with government advice and will publish any updates on our website accordingly.

https://www.richmondfellowship.org.uk/category/coronavirus/

Richmond Fellowship’s Fenland Wellbeing service - is now closed.

The replacement ‘Cambridgeshire and Peterborough Good Life Service’ went live on 2 September 2019 and is delivered by a new provider, CPSL Mind. To refer to this new service, email: goodlife@cpslmind.org.uk or call 0300 303 4363.

Due to this, we are no longer in a position to accept any new referrals.

Richmond Fellowship still provides an employment outreach service covering certain parts of the Fens. Please email: info.cambs@richmondfellowship.org.uk for more details.

https://www.richmondfellowship.org.uk/cambridgeshire/fenland-wellbeing/

Head To Toe Charity - date updated 01/04/2020

Despite the risk, our staff are still going to people’s home, they are still running our wards and they are still making sure that our community is cared for amidst the crisis. These are our CPFT Heroes, on the very front line of the biggest challenge the NHS has ever seen. 

https://www.cpft.nhs.uk/HeadtoToe/covid-19-help-our-nhs.htm

Recovery College East - date updated 01/04/2020

closed until further notice

Following advice from Cambridgeshire and Peterborough NHS Foundation Trust, and as a proactive response to Coronavirus (Covid-19), Recovery College East has cancelled, with immediate effect, all of its current courses and temporarily closing. Further to this, the Open Days scheduled for the new Peterborough College, later this month, have also been cancelled.

The safety of college students and our staff is of utmost importance to us at this time and we appreciate your continued understanding around the current temporary closure.

We will of course contact you when the college is scheduled to re-open etc. and will endeavour to keep our recovery college web pages up to date with any new information in relation to the closure.  Please note that during this time, and to enable the college staff team to support colleagues in other services across the Trust, there will be no one available to answer general enquiries in relation to the college via email or telephone during the closure. In light of this we would advise all students to regularly check into our web pages for any further updates.

We would like to thank you all for your continued support and understanding and look forward to welcoming you back to the college when we are in a position to be able to re-open.

https://www.cpft.nhs.uk/about-us/recovery-college-east.htm

CPFT

We will be communicating directly to all patients who may be affected by these temporary changes and advising them where they can get urgent support if needed. Face-to-face visits in the community will only be for those who require it, and others will be supported virtually through video or telephone calls. 

  • Individual placement support – New routine referrals to the service have been temporarily paused to focus on existing patients and those with greatest needs.
  • CLASS clinic/ADHD – Service is currently paused to new referrals.
  • Darwin Nurseries – Service is currently paused and the farm shop is closed to the public. Animals and plants are being maintained by a member of staff.
  • Primary care mental health services (PCMHS) – Prioritising support for patients who need urgent care that may otherwise result in a hospital admission or have serious consequences for the person’s health, safety and function.
  • Personality disorder community service (PDCS) - New routine referrals to the service have been temporarily paused to focus on existing patients and those with greatest needs.
  • Psychological wellbeing service – The service is still open to self-referral here. New referrals and those currently on the waiting list will be prioritised based on need.

Personality Disorder Services :

Rethink Mental Illness - date updated 02/04/2020

As a result, we are asking that all Rethink Mental Illness groups postpone all ‘face to face’ activities for the foreseeable future. This includes all meetings (however small), and community-based activities such as sports, walking, art, music etc. as well as stalls, gatherings and informal meetings.

Our Involvement Team have been asked to work from home and adhere to this guidance. Therefore, support to groups will now be provided by telephone and email and Group Development Officers will be unable to meet in person for the foreseeable future.

During these difficult times, and while people are physically keeping apart, it is important to stay in contact and we advise that groups keep in touch by phone and email. We are currently exploring ways of supporting groups to do meet virtually e.g. through online service providers, Skype, teleconference etc. We will issue further guidance shortly.

https://www.rethink.org/advice-and-information/covid-19-support/

Time to Change - date updated 02/04/2020

Checking in on your family, friends and colleagues is always important. But during the coronavirus outbreak this will be more important than ever.

https://www.time-to-change.org.uk/coronavirus

CPSL Mind - date updated 02/04/2020

It is with regret that we have to announce the temporary suspension of our community-based services – namely our Good Mood cafes, Open Door calm spaces, Peer Support Groups and Perinatal Groups – until further notice.
Our Changing Lives Counselling Service has also been temporarily suspended and we will be unable to accept new referrals at this time. Our Cognitive Behavioural Therapy service will continue but as a telephone-based service instead of face-to-face. All individuals affected will be contacted directly. https://www.cpslmind.org.uk/temporary-suspension-of-cpsl-mind-services/

https://www.mind.org.uk/information-support/coronavirus-and-your-wellbeing/

Bipolar UK - date updated 02/04/2020

The government has announced unprecedented measures to contain the spread of coronavirus. This will have a profound effect on the country and in particular people affected by bipolar. It has never been more important that we come together as a community and help each other through this difficult time. We have produced a helpful guide that will be of value to you in these times of uncertainty. Our priority as a charity is to keep our staff, supporters, and volunteers safe and to continue to provide vital support for people affected by the condition.

We have taken the difficult decision to suspend our support groups until a time when the government says that group gatherings are safe again. We have suspended volunteering at our office and all staff are now working from home. It will take a few days to get our new systems up and running so apologies in advance for any delays in responding to questions and queries.  Whilst we are taking all steps possible to minimise disruption to our operations, this does mean at the current time we have no access to our post and would encourage anybody reaching out, to do so by electronic communications where at all possible. Importantly though we are rolling up our sleeves and doing everything we can to help people affected by bipolar to get through this.

Our moderated eCommunity is free to use and open seven days a week. You can sign up anonymously here and talk to other people affected by bipolar who are going through the same as you.

We will continue to operate a call back and email service for people to get advice and guidance and to just have a chat to relieve some of the loneliness of self-isolation. To arrange a call back please email us.

We have many blogs which can be found in our pendulum section that have been penned by those living with bipolar that you may find helpful too

https://www.bipolaruk.org/blog/coronavirus-emergency-how-we-can-support-you

CPFT Services - date updated 14/04/2020

We will be communicating directly to all patients who may be affected by these temporary changes and advising them where they can get urgent support if needed. Face-to-face visits in the community will only be for those who require it, and others will be supported virtually through video or telephone calls. 

  • Individual placement support – New routine referrals to the service have been temporarily paused to focus on existing patients and those with greatest needs.
  • CLASS clinic/ADHD – Service is currently paused to new referrals.
  • Darwin Nurseries – Service is currently paused and the farm shop is closed to the public. Animals and plants are being maintained by a member of staff.
  • Primary care mental health services (PCMHS) – Prioritising support for patients who need urgent care that may otherwise result in a hospital admission or have serious consequences for the person’s health, safety and function.
  • Personality disorder community service (PDCS) - New routine referrals to the service have been temporarily paused to focus on existing patients and those with greatest needs.
  • Psychological wellbeing service – The service is still open to self-referral here. New referrals and those currently on the waiting list will be prioritised based on need.

Young People Services :

CPSL Mind - date updated 02/04/2020

It is with regret that we have to announce the temporary suspension of our community-based services – namely our Good Mood cafes, Open Door calm spaces, Peer Support Groups and Perinatal Groups – until further notice.
Our Changing Lives Counselling Service has also been temporarily suspended and we will be unable to accept new referrals at this time. Our Cognitive Behavioural Therapy service will continue but as a telephone-based service instead of face-to-face. All individuals affected will be contacted directly. https://www.cpslmind.org.uk/temporary-suspension-of-cpsl-mind-services/

https://www.mind.org.uk/information-support/coronavirus-and-your-wellbeing/

CASUS

We will be communicating directly to all patients who may be affected by these temporary changes and advising them where they can get urgent support if needed. Face-to-face visits in the community will only be for those who require it, and others will be supported virtually through video or telephone calls. 

CASUS (Child and adolescent substance use service) – New routine referrals to the service have been temporarily paused to prioritise those with high level needs.

CPFT CAMH Neuro

We will be communicating directly to all patients who may be affected by these temporary changes and advising them where they can get urgent support if needed. Face-to-face visits in the community will only be for those who require it, and others will be supported virtually through video or telephone calls. 

CAMH Neuro (Child and adolescent mental health) – New referrals for assessments have been temporarily paused. Priority patients are being offered online therapy and support, where appropriate.

CPFT Paediatric Therapies

We will be communicating directly to all patients who may be affected by these temporary changes and advising them where they can get urgent support if needed. Face-to-face visits in the community will only be for those who require it, and others will be supported virtually through video or telephone calls. 

Paediatric therapies (including occupational therapy, physiotherapy, speech & language theray) – New referrals have been temporarily paused, except for children with complex eating and drinking difficulties in speech and language therapy.

CGL Cambridgeshire - date updated 02/04/2020

The way you get support from us might be different for a while, but we are still here. We’ll do everything we can to help you stay safe.
Prescription - Your keyworker will be in touch with you about your prescription.
Opening times - Our opening times are changing. We'll now be open from 9:30 - 16:30 from Monday to Friday. We aren't able to open on a Saturday at the moment. Please don't come to our office unless it's absolutely necessary.
Groups - We're sorry to say that our groups aren't going to be running for a while.
New people - We are still open to new people. Please phone us on 0300 5550101 so we can arrange a telephone assessment.
Social media - We will be posting helpful information and advice on social media. Make sure you follow us on Facebook and Twitter.
If you're worried about something, please get in touch. You can contact us during normal hours on 0300 5550101 - please choose option 1. Or you can email us on cambridgeshirereferrals@cgl.org.uk

We are planning to keep our needle exchanges open, but please call before you come.
CGL - https://www.changegrowlive.org/advice-info/coronavirus

Respect YMCA - date updated 02/04/2020

We understand that these are particularly challenging times for everyone, and particularly schools.

The mental health and wellbeing of your staff, students and parents will be critical during this current climate, and at a time where social distancing will create a barrier to the typical support and guidance schools will provide to their students.

YMCA Trinity Group is one of the region’s leading mental health and wellbeing support charities, and we aim to be there for every person in the community, supporting young people, schools and their families through difficult times with a wide range of programmes and services.

We are here to help you and your school community during this difficult time. As well as our counselling support, advice and training, we wanted to draw your attention to a digital tool that may be of particular benefit at this time.

https://ymcatrinitygroup.org.uk/supporting-mental-health-and-wellbeing-during-unprecedented-school-closures/

On My Mind - date updated 02/04/2020

This guidance was created on 17th March.  Since then Government guidelines around self-isolating has changed.  We encourage young people and their families to stay in touch with their friends and relatives remotely via apps and social media and not to meet face-to-face.

https://www.annafreud.org/what-we-do/anna-freud-learning-network/coronavirus/

CHUMS - date updated 02/04/2020

Following guidance from Public Health England and the Government, all face-to-face contacts with children, young people and families will cease from 5pm on Wednesday 18th March, for the foreseeable future to minimise exposure and unnecessary risk.

CHUMS will continue to operate and maintain our services and will endeavour to minimise any disruption to the care we provide.

We will now be offering our interventions using the following methods:

  • Telephone assessments
  • Individual interventions by phone, WhatsApp, Facetime or Skype
  • Group interventions using Microsoft Teams.
  • Virtual drop-ins

Initial contact will be made by phone and the most convenient method of communication can then be decided.

If you have an existing referral with CHUMS or you are about to make a new referral, we will contact you as soon as possible.

If there is a change in circumstance or an escalation of your presenting issue that requires emergency attention, please contact your GP, call 111 or contact A&E.

We can assure you that we are doing everything possible to continue to deliver a high standard of service and appreciate your patience during this challenging time.

If you have any questions don’t hesitate to get in touch with our support team.

If you haven’t already, please take a look at our free Coronavirus Awareness video.

http://chums.uk.com/chums-covid-19-coronavirus-statement/

LGBTQ+ Services :

Cambridge Diamonds - date updated 02/04/2020

Due to the covid-19 pandemic and social distancing measures, our regular pub meetings are currently suspended. Instead we are having virtual meets via Zoom; please contact us for details.

http://www.diamondstgc.org.uk/

The Kite Trust - date updated 02/04/2020

At The Kite Trust, the health and wellbeing of members of our community is paramount, and for that reason we’ve taken the decision to move to delivering all of our youth work services remotely until at least the 1st April and postpone the delivery of any training or workshops to a later date. We will create opportunities for young people who use our services to seek support and to maintain connections, and for adults to ask questions. For that reason we will continue providing 1-to-1 support to young people via email, telephone, and video calling. We will also be hosting groups for young people using video calls and developing other forms of social connection and support over the coming weeks. Contact your regular youth worker or email info@thekitetrust.org.uk for more details. We are dedicated to looking out for our wider LGBTQ+ community by preventing the spread of this virus as much as we are able and offering support to those in need.

http://thekitetrust.org.uk/

Victims & Witnesses Services :

The Cambridgeshire Constabulary - date updated 02/04/2020

Coronavirus (COVID-19) privacy notice

This privacy notice is to make it easier to understand and provide you with more information about how police forces may seek to collect and hold information about you in relation to the unprecedented challenges we are all facing during the Coronavirus pandemic (COVID-19).

https://www.cambs.police.uk/information-and-services/About-us/Privacy-notice/Coronavirus-COVID-19-privacy-notice

Victim Services - date updated 02/04/2020

Due to the COVID-19 virus we are having to reduce the working hours at the Victim & Witness Hub. Please see new times below. However we will continue to support Victims and Witnesses in the normal way.

The Victim and Witness Hub offers a free confidential service with a team of dedicated Victim and Witness Care Coordinators and specialists who can offer practical or emotional support to help victims cope and recover from the effects of the crime.

If you would like support please call the Victim and Witness Hub on 0800 781 6818.

The Victim and Witness Hub opening hours are:

Monday to Friday 09:00 until 17:00

Saturday 10:00 until 14:00

Please note that the Victim and Witness Hub does not open on Sundays or Bank Holidays

https://www.cambsvictimservices.co.uk/about-the-website/contact

Victim Support - date updated 02/04/2020

We recognise that the coronavirus is causing anxiety for many us, particularly victims of crime. Those affected by crime may be worried about accessing support services and could also feel anxiety around delays to trials or police investigations.

Although the outbreak has had a clear impact on the justice system, we recognise that people will continue to live with the impact of crime, particularly when in isolation.

We are closely following government advice and have suspended face-to-face support to safeguard the health of staff and victims. In response, we have built our capacity to support victims remotely.

Our free and confidential Support line (08 08 16 89 111) remains open 24/7, as do the regional live chat options available on our website (www.victimsupport.org.uk). Victims of crime in contact with our teams across the country are still being supported remotely. Meanwhile, a wide range of resources and information on dealing with the impact of crime are available on our website.

We are preparing to handle more cases relating to specific crimes as patterns of behaviour change due to the virus. This includes an anticipated spike in inquiries from victims of hate crime, domestic abuse victims forced to self-isolate with their abuser, anti-social behaviour victims targeted by potentially abusive neighbours, and victims of fraud or other cyber-enabled crimes which we expect to increase.

We encourage victims to continue accessing our support, particularly at a time when many feel concerned by court cases being postponed, or worried about the police’s ability to respond to incidents. Crime, whenever it happens, can make victims feel isolated. During this challenging time, Victim Support’s message is clear: our specialist support services are still open and we are here for you whenever you need us.

Our free and confidential, 24/7 Support line is available on 08 08 16 89 111

https://www.victimsupport.org.uk/more-us/press/press-releases/247-support-still-available-victims-crime

GOV Website - date updated 02/04/2020

Stay at home

  • Only go outside for food, health reasons or work (but only if you cannot work from home)
  • If you go out, stay 2 metres (6ft) away from other people at all times
  • Wash your hands as soon as you get home

Do not meet others, even friends or family. You can spread the virus even if you don’t have symptoms.

https://www.gov.uk/get-support-as-a-victim-of-crime

Crime Stoppers UK - date updated 02/04/2020

The UK is facing difficult and worrying times with the spread of the Coronavirus (COVID-19), and I want to personally let you know that CrimeStoppers is doing all it can to ensure everyone can continue to speak up and report crime 100% anonymously.  Like many other charities, I have the welfare of our beneficiaries, volunteers and staff to consider.

 We’re here for you and want to continue delivering a great service for those that want to speak up about crime. We are working hard to make sure the welfare of our Contact Centre staff stays paramount, and we have plans in hand to cope as matters develop.

 People are still contacting us by the thousand, on a daily basis, and we will continue to make the most of that information to help protect the public.  We’ve seen evidence that fraud is evolving to exploit the changing environment and urge everyone to be more vigilant to protect themselves and the wider community. 

Please watch our social media channels as we flag up any growing crime issues as they develop. If ever there has been a time to look out for one another, the time is now.  As always, if you have crime information, and want to remain 100% anonymous, contact us on the phone or online.

https://crimestoppers-uk.org/pages/crimestoppers-response-to-covid-19

Karma Nirvana - date updated 02/04/2020

We wanted to give a brief update in light of the current Coronavirus (COVID-19) situation and Karma Nirvana’s position.

The Karma Nirvana helpline will remain open until further government announcements which may change our position. However, we recognise that many victims could be put at further risk so contact to the helpline is still currently available Mon-Fri, 9am to 5pm, via the:

Helpline number 08005999247 or Email support@karmanirvana.org.uk.

For any professionals that may be working with clients who are at risk of honour-based abuse or forced marriage and unable to visit them, do also contact the helpline for guidance.

Karma Nirvana’s advocacy service will temporarily cease face to face support and any planned sessions will be conducted over the helpline. For further information please email advocacy@karmanirvana.org.uk.

Any planned events in the coming months will be postponed based on current government guidance. Please contact events@karmanirvana.org.uk to rearrange any planned training.

Current plans for the Community Champions programme will also be delayed due to the current climate.

Finally, here’s a few health tips to protect yourself and others from COVID-19:

  • Increase self/hand hygiene
  • Use soap for at least 20 seconds
  • Wash your hands more often
  • Stay hydrated and eat well
  • Support one another
  • Sanitise common areas like your mobile phone/car steering wheel/desk spaces
  • If you feel unwell, please work from home or stay home

https://karmanirvana.org.uk/covid-19-were-all-in-this-together/

SARI - date updated 02/04/2020

In light of the recent coronavirus outbreak in the UK we have had to change some of our working practices.

SARI (and Bristol Hate Crime & Discrimination Services) will continue to be here for any victim of hate crime from the Avon and Somerset area. Clearly, the circumstances associated with the impact of coronavirus could lead to increased tension, a rise in anti-social behaviour and/ or hate crime, as leisure and social facilities are shut down and people are forced to stay home, facing illness, uncertainty, and loss of income.

We have robust systems in place, enabling us to continue to deliver services in the event of a complete ‘lock down.’

Our clients will remain our foremost concern, and they will be able to contact us just as before. Our Out-of-Hours Emergency Phone Support Service will also continue.

We are adapting the service to minimise face-to-face contact, and we have begun conducting case openings, client meetings and agency meetings online—by phone, video call and e-mail.

Our other services, such as training, education, and awareness, are being put on hold temporarily but we will review alternative options for providing these interventions online and virtually going forward.

If you have any other queries or concerns about SARI’s services at this time, please do not hesitate to contact us.

We will keep this page updated as the situation progresses—meanwhile, stay safe and let’s all do our bit to keep our communities calm, supported and looked after during this unprecedented crisis.

https://www.sariweb.org.uk/

Stone Wall - date updated 02/04/2020

We are in increasingly difficult and uncertain times.

As coronavirus (COVID-19) has been declared a pandemic - a global health crisis - we are feeling it at every touchpoint in society.

Whenever something happens, there are always those of us who face additional barriers through being more excluded than others. For some lesbian, gay, bi and trans people, the risks of homelessness, insecure employment, restricted access to healthcare and other inequalities deepen. Our LGBT in Britain - Health Report shows us that LGBT people are at greater risk of marginalisation within such crises, and those with multiple marginalised identities can struggle even more.

We aren’t able to provide healthcare advice, as we are not a health charity. It’s important to stay informed on current advice for the public, including from the UK Government.

However, even in times like these, something becomes abundantly clear.

LGBT communities across the country are coming together to show each other solidarity, support and provide lifesaving services. Here’s how they can help – and how we can help each other.

https://www.stonewall.org.uk/about-us/news/covid-19-%E2%80%93-how-lgbt-inclusive-organisations-can-help

FASO - date updated 02/04/2020

In these unprecedented times, I put out an urgent request for you to email your MP/ministers with the following message, in an attempt to stop or minimise the possible dire consequences to part of the prison population. Margaret FASO 19.3.20 http://www.false-allegations.org.uk/news/

Equality Human Rights - date updated 02/04/2020

The Equality and Human Rights Commission recognises and supports the primary role of government in the current context: to keep people safe and protect the future of our nation. This must involve difficult decisions and compromises, far beyond the normal scope of everyday governing. However, such actions will be most effective when public safety and economic interests are balanced with our long-held values of freedom and respect.

COVID-19 does not discriminate, but it does impact people differently. The priority remains those who are directly most seriously affected, more likely to be older people and those with underlying health conditions, and the people who care for them – whether that is their loved ones or our dedicated health and social care professionals.

https://www.equalityhumanrights.com/en/our-work/news/human-rights-and-equality-considerations-responding-coronavirus-pandemic

Support Line - date updated 02/04/2020

This is an extremely worrying time for everyone and in particular those who are elderly, those with physical and mental health issues and people who live alone and may be isolated.

We hope the following information will be useful to everyone and a means of support to those who may need help from others. (We will regularly be adding content to this page).

If anyone is in need of assistance and unable to find help in their local area from the support services below, please contact us at info@supportline.org.uk

https://www.supportline.org.uk/problems/coronavirus-covid-19/

Action Fraud - date updated 02/04/2020

As a result of the ongoing COVID-19 situation, unfortunately our contact centre is currently providing a reduced service. If you do need to chat to us, we have a small number of advisors on hand to help but please be advised that waiting times will be longer. We apologise for any inconvenience caused. If your UK business, charity or organisation is currently under cyber-attack and data is potentially at risk please call 0300 123 2040 immediately and press 9. You can continue to make reports of fraud in the normal way via the website. Please be advised that we no longer take reports for Police Scotland. Wherever you may live, if the fraud you are reporting has occurred in or from Scotland then you will need to report it to Police Scotland via the 101- telephone service. In an emergency always call 999.

https://www.actionfraud.police.uk/

Cross Keys Homes - date updated 02/04/2020

We are currently living through exceptional times. We want to assure you we are taking our role in protecting you, our residents, our employees and the wider community very seriously. You can be confident that CKH is adhering to all government guidelines with regard to COVID-19 (Coronavirus). We are doing everything we can to ensure we keep delivering our services for you whilst also protecting our employees, customers and the wider community in which we work.

The majority of our employees are now working from home. We aim to keep all essential services running, although there will be some changes and restrictions in place this is as a result of us working to government guidelines and in the event of our staff team being depleted due to sickness either theirs or the people they care for.

Repairs - We will only be carrying out emergency repairs, along with gas and electricity tests, for the foreseeable future to ensure your safety. Please help us to manage the situation efficiently and only email our Repairs team on housingrepairs@crosskeyshomes.co.uk if you have an emergency repair.

Examples of emergency repairs include:

  • No heating
  • No power
  • Major leaks
  • Security problems
  • Anything that is a risk to your health and safety

We have also cancelled all non-urgent repairs that were booked in for the coming weeks. We are very sorry about this, but we need to do all we can to protect you and our workforce. We regret that these will need to be reported again once our Repairs service is operating to full capacity again.

If you are in the process of having planned works carried out to your home, we will continue to get these finished for you.

Defects in new homes - Developers have informed us that they will only be carrying out emergency repairs. To report an emergency defect in your new build home, please call us on 01733 396411. Be prepared to tell us about vulnerable members of your household and whether anyone has any COVID-19 symptoms.

Our cleaning service has stopped with immediate effect.

All our offices are closed. We request that you contact us instead by email or by using our website Live Chat service wherever possible.

Contacting us -

To contact our Customer Services team, email: customerservices@crosskeyshomes.co.uk

To speak to us about your rent, email: incomemanagement@crosskeyshomes.co.uk

To report an emergency repair only, email: housingrepairs@crosskeyshomes.co.uk

You can also contact us on our website from Monday to Friday, 9am to 5pm, by using our Live Chat service.

https://www.crosskeyshomes.co.uk/latest-news-and-updates/coronavirus-covid19--631

Coroners Courts Support Service - date updated 02/04/2020

Following government guidelines and to help reduce the spread of the Coronavirus, our volunteers are not able to deliver our usual service within the Coroners’ Courts until further notice.

We will continue to offer support and guidance on the inquest process via our national helpline – 0300 111 2141 or helpline@ccss.org.uk.  For helpline operating hours please see our ‘Contact Us’ page.

We apologise for any inconvenience.

https://coronerscourtssupportservice.org.uk/

Disability Services :

National Autistic Society - date updated 02/04/2020
https://www.autism.org.uk/services/helplines/coronavirus.aspx#

Cambridgeshire Deaf Association - date updated 02/04/2020

Coronavirus: Following Government advice, all our Open Support Services are closed and community events, such as drop-in and coffee mornings are cancelled but some are available to join online (see more details here). We are still working to support the community. You can contact us for support by texting 07429 231230 or use our online chat service during opening hours or click here: Get in touch More Information

https://cambsdeaf.org/coronavirus-update-6-online-drop-in-and-coffee-mornings/

Family Action - date updated 02/04/2020

We are committed to supporting families through the COVID-19 outbreak. We know this situation will bring added pressure and uncertainly to families across the UK so we’re adapting our services, setting up a new small grants scheme and delivering food to those most in need, growing our virtual befriending service and providing expert advice to help ease some of the anxiety and stress.

https://www.family-action.org.uk/get-involved/covid-19-response/

Camsight - date updated 02/04/2020

We immediately reacted and have changed the way we work. What Cam Sight is doing:

  • We are carrying out a ring-a-round service to continue supporting people in their own homes. With empathy, concern and warmth each client is being contacted via the phone to provide support at this critical time, to help people before they reach crisis point.
  • We are offering information and advice by telephone, email or via our website. We are also sharing information and advice through our website and social media.
  • We can assist with the purchase of equipment and also provide information. There are many pieces of equipment available to help including talking clocks and watches, lighting, large and tactile playing cards, large button phones.
  • We can provide IT advice and support for a range of technologies including PCs, smart phones, tablets, home hubs.

We’re determined to be there for those who need our help and especially those who have no one else to turn to, but we desperately need your support.

This new way of working is more time intensive and the IT costs incurred to support our staff are great. Our regular income streams have come to an abrupt halt and we are asking you for help to support the running of Cam Sight.

The demand for our vital service is increasing rapidly. We would be so grateful if you could help us be there for those who desperately need us during this crisis.

https://www.camsight.org.uk/appeal/general

HuntsBlind - date updated 02/04/2020

Due to the coronavirus outbreak Hunts Society for the Blind has suspended all social and fundraising activities until further notice. The shop, office and resource centre are closed to visitors but telephone calls and emails will be answered. Visits from outreach workers and volunteer visitors have also been suspended. Staff will continue to provide support, information and advice over the telephone.

We know that this is a very difficult and worrying time for our members and we will do our best to provide help as needed. Please telephone on 01480 453438 or email info@huntsblind.co.uk.

http://www.huntsblind.co.uk/latestnews.php

DIAL - date updated 02/04/2020

Our dedicated telephone helpline for people with physical disabilities (and their friends and family) is still very much open – and we are monitoring the COVID-19 situation closely. Our main priority is to provide a quality information service that is both useful and practical.

If you do need any help at all in these troubling times then our highly trained and experienced friendly staff members will be able to talk through any concerns that you have. No question or worry is too big or too small from welfare benefits to disability equipment and anything in between, or even just a friendly chat.

All of our advisors are currently working from home, but the contact number and office hours remain the same (Monday to Thursday 10am to 4pm Telephone 01733 265551). During this time, we’ll be doing our very best to offer our usual level of service, but our phone lines may be more busy than usual. So please bear with us and leave a message if we are busy and we will get back to you or perhaps try our email info@disabilitypeterborough.org.

We have closed all of our activities and the Shopmobility service until the government says it is safe to resume them.

We know that stocks of certain items have become very scarce and hard to source from paracetamol tablets to continence products. We also know that getting home deliveries from supermarkets has become severely restricted. If you have run out of items then please let us know and we will do our upmost to source them for you

https://www.disabilitypeterborough.org/disability-peterborough-updated-services/

Making Space - date updated 02/04/2020

Content updated: 25/03/2020 - We want to reassure you that whilst we are doing our best to keep life as normal as possible for the people we support, we are also taking additional measures, following the advice of Public Health England, to ensure people’s safety.

Here at Making Space, our first priority is always the people we support, their family and carers and our colleagues.

Our teams are already well versed in infection control and we have clear processes in place to prevent and contain infections amongst the people we support and our teams. However, we are not complacent about the coronavirus outbreak, or the potential risks.

Read more at https://makingspace.co.uk/news/2020/coronavirus_update

Other Services :

Illuminate- date updated 31/03/2020

Dear Community Group Members and Associates, 
 
We are all concerned about the spread and impact of COVID19, and as a charity, we want to reassure you that we are still here and open. We operate a policy of working from home and are using online platforms, phone, text and emails to deliver our services and communications. 

 

As you some of you are aware we made the decision to cancel our scheduled community events last week, this was in response to guidance and discussion - we apprciate upu understanding this. Thank you to those of you who contacted me last week, in respect of alerting me to the decisions you had already taken for yourselves in respect of understanding your vulnerabilities - this is good mindfulness.  

 

It is important we stay connected, although we can no longer offer our work face to face, we are aware that the isolation that people are now experiencing will have an impact on mental well being, so we have updated our offer to beneficiaries and list below 4 areas people can access our help;


1) Sign up to our regular newsletter at https://illuminatecharity.org.uk/newsletter.php 

2) We will also be putting more tips, videos and help on our Facebook page, so please refer and like our page at https://www.facebook.com/IlluminateCharity/

3) We are on Twitter https://www.twitter.com/@illuminatecomm2 connecting with our local Cambridgeshire community partnerships, local organisations and beneficiaries  - sharing both connection and information at this challenging time.


4) Our priority and commitment is to our beneficiaries and  we are now offering an Illuminate Coaching for Confidence package. Delivered by Sam and Maria, both qualified and accredited coaches. The Coaching for Confidence package is – Up to three individual meetings online using telephone, Skype (Skype is free to download to phone or desktop), Teams or Facetime. Meetings will last up to one hour.

 

This package is more limited than we can offer through our usual group work, so we anticipate demand will be high, so please do ensure in referring anyone to us to apply for coaching, that they are fully committed and ready to make change.
To refer a client  please ask them to get in touch and we will send them a simple application form. People are very welcome to self-refer, just email Sam or Maria at info@illuminatecharity.org.uk   

4) We are also offering a one off signposting session with Anna our Illuminate Community Group Coordinator, that can be accessed by contacting us. This will help in understanding and accessing other services are that may available and relevant to individual need. Again please email us at info@illuminatecharity.org.uk

All these opportunities are free and our remit remains the same, 18 years old and over no upper age limit, unemployed or in-between jobs or working part-time.

 

This is the first stage in our planned changes, which we can implement straight away. We are also developing teleconferencing access for beneficiaries, where we will deliver support and elements of our Confidence for Change course in an interactive way, at no cost to our beneficiaries. As soon as this is up and running we will keep you informed.

 

It is a big change for us all and we intend to keep playing a role in working locally.

Thanks and keep well

With positive thoughts from us all

Anna, Maria and Sam

Street Support - date updated 02/04/2020

During the COVID-19 pandemic, it is likely that services for people who are homeless or at risk will be restricted. As more people will need to self-isolate, we will see extra challenges and support needs arise, such as getting food to people who cannot get out or afford to buy it.

The Street Support Cambridge team will continue to update the information below as it changes, which may be quite regularly, so please check back for further information. Please also let us know if you have information that would be useful to share by emailing cambridge@streetsupport.net

Service opening times: The following list gives information on how some key services in Cambridge have changed in response to the coronavirus.

Jimmy's Cambridge - date updated 02/04/2020

Jimmy's Cambridge is taking action to minimise risks, while they remain open for business, supporting our residents, supporting people who find themselves homeless, and supporting each other.

Cambridge City Council - date updated 02/04/2020

Cambridge City Council - see 'Customer Services' for updates on office access - most receptions are now closed and focus is on phone and on-line contact.

Wintercomfort - date updated 02/04/2020

Wintercomfort has regrettably had to close its doors for the foreseeable future as a result of COVID-19. This was needed to protect service users and staff. They will be maintaining contact with service users by phone and email.

Street Outreach - date updated 02/04/2020

Street Outreach is focusing on the well-being of rough sleepers and is introducing care packs.

Center 33 - date updated 02/04/2020

Centre 33 have closed their hubs temporarily and will not be holding any appointments, drop-ins or meetings until further notice. Instead they will be offering support via telephone or video calling.

The SUN Network - date updated 02/04/2020

Please be aware that The SUN Network staff are homeworking as advised by the UK government, but you can still contact us. enquiries@sunnetwork.org.uk or WhatsApp or text 07712 358 172. Stay well.

https://www.sunnetwork.org.uk/

Citizens Advice Bureau - date updated 02/04/2020

This page is regularly updated as government advice becomes available. There are things you can do to help you avoid getting coronavirus, also known as COVID-19. There are also things you can do to stop the virus spreading if you think you have it.

You can read more about the symptoms of coronavirus and how to avoid it on the NHS website. You can also watch British Sign Language versions of government advice on the SignHealth website.

https://www.citizensadvice.org.uk/health/coronavirus-what-it-means-for-you/

CCVS Supported Volunteering Project - date updated 02/04/2020

In response to the Covid-19 crisis CCVS have had to postpone all our training and events for the foreseeable future.  However our staff are all still working from home and keen to offer help and support:

  • if you’re an existing community group
  • if you are a new group responding to the Covid-19 crisis
  • if you want to donate or volunteer to help during this crisis

You can contact us on enquiries@cambridgecvs.org.uk and we will get back to you promptly.

We are working to keep this site updated with the latest information you need as well as sharing the impact the Covid-19 crisis is having on the charity sector and those it serves, please use the links on the left to see more.

If you are signed up to our newsletter we will be sending out very regular updates we are also very active on twitter @CambridgeCVS. If you're not already receiving our updates sign up.

http://www.cambridgecvs.org.uk/Covid19

Making Space - date updated 02/04/2020

Content updated: 25/03/2020 - We want to reassure you that whilst we are doing our best to keep life as normal as possible for the people we support, we are also taking additional measures, following the advice of Public Health England, to ensure people’s safety.

Here at Making Space, our first priority is always the people we support, their family and carers and our colleagues.

Our teams are already well versed in infection control and we have clear processes in place to prevent and contain infections amongst the people we support and our teams. However, we are not complacent about the coronavirus outbreak, or the potential risks.

Read more at https://makingspace.co.uk/news/2020/coronavirus_update

Customer Affairs - date updated 02/04/2020

https://www.consumeraffairs.com/news/coronavirus-update-new-tests-can-tell-if-youve-had-covid-19-some-firms-cut-401k-contributions-040120.html

National Debt Line - date updated 02/04/2020

We know many people are worried about their finances right now. We are here to help. Like many employers, we are taking steps to look after our staff in line with public health guidance, but we are open to give you the advice and support you need.

  1. For instant information and guidance see our Coronavirus fact sheet.
  2. Webchat with a specialist adviser 9am - 8pm Monday to Friday.
  3. Call to speak to an adviser on 0808 808 4000 9am - 8pm Monday to Friday.
  4. Use our Digital Advice Tool to do a budget if you're ready and get online advice about your debt solution options.

We're working hard to take as many calls and webchats as possible. We want to help and are grateful for your understanding about any delays there might be to get through.

https://www.nationaldebtline.org/

Money Advice Service - date updated 02/04/2020

The spread of coronavirus, also called COVID-19, in the UK and across the world could have implications for your work, benefits and travel plans. This guide will look at your rights to sick pay, what benefits you can claim if you’re self-employed or not entitled to Statutory Sick Pay (SSP).

https://www.moneyadviceservice.org.uk/en/articles/coronavirus-what-it-means-for-you

Men's Sheds - date updated 02/04/2020

It’s important Shedders stay in touch, especially during a time of national and global crisis, here are a few ways of keeping in touch as a Shed.

There should be something for everyone and the best solution for you will depend on the sort of technology your Shedders have access to and are most comfortable using.

As you know, in our last update we explained that you should all follow the guidance of the government with regard to Coronavirus. This remains our guidance.

The guidance is changing daily and as such we are not publishing information that would be out of date as soon as it is published. We are saying that you should follow government guidance.

https://menssheds.org.uk/2020/03/23/coronavirus-update/

VoiceAbility - date updated 02/04/2020

On 17 March 2020 we created internal guidance for VoiceAbility staff about advocacy during coronovirus. We are now sharing it publicly in the hope that it might be of some assistance to others, especially advocacy organisations, and ultimately to people who rely on the support we all provide. It was written in good faith based on the best information available at a particular point in time. No liability is accepted for any adverse consequences of reliance upon it. We welcome feedback to CV19@voiceability.org

The following sheets are available:

  • General guidelines
  • Our duties as advocates
  • Our priorities and what counts as essential advocacy
  • Providing advocacy from a distance
  • Visits to care settings
  • Planning ahead

https://www.voiceability.org/news/coronavirus-resources-for-advocacy

Riverside  - date updated 02/04/2020

We appreciate what an uncertain and worrying time this is for our customers across the country. We are continually monitoring Government advice and as a result have introduced a number of changes to our services. This is to ensure we minimise risks to the health and safety of our customers and staff whilst also trying to continue to deliver our services to you.

https://www.riverside.org.uk/coronavirus/

Healthwatch - date updated 02/04/2020

The local NHS is postponing all non-essential appointments from 20 March to help it deal with the pressures caused by COVID-19 coronavirus.

They need to make sure they have the maximum possible number of hospital inpatient and critical care beds available to respond to this pressing demand.

This means all non-essential outpatient appointments, planned procedures and operations will be postponed until further notice.

They expect this to be for a period of at least three months.

We know that people waiting for treatment will be disappointed and possibly worried by this news. But you will remain on the list for appointments once they start up again.

This means you won’t need to go back to your GP to get re-referred once normal services resume.

You don’t need to call the hospital or care provider. You will be contacted directly to reschedule any appointments if you are affected. 

It is important to still attend urgent or emergency care appointments, unless you have been contacted and told otherwise.

If you have any questions about this – please get in touch with Cambridgeshire and Peterborough Clinical Commissioning Group.

https://www.healthwatchpeterborough.co.uk/non-essential-outpatient-appointments-to-be-postponed/

https://www.healthwatchcambridgeshire.co.uk/advice-and-information/2020-03-10/information-coronavirus-covid-19-updated

Mental Health First Aid - date updated 02/04/2020

MHFA England remains open and we are doing everything we can to protect the health of our people, Instructor Members, delegates and clients.

This includes following the advice of the UK Government and PHE, which means all our staff are now working remotely.

If you have any queries about our courses, please get in touch on info@mhfaengland.org.

If you are working from home, you can also download and share our guidance on how to support your mental health while working from home.

https://mhfaengland.org/mhfa-centre/news/coronavirus-updates/

On My Mind - date updated 02/04/2020

This guidance was created on 17th March.  Since then Government guidelines around self-isolating has changed.  We encourage young people and their families to stay in touch with their friends and relatives remotely via apps and social media and not to meet face-to-face.

https://www.annafreud.org/what-we-do/anna-freud-learning-network/coronavirus/

Insight - date updated 02/04/2020

We’ve been closely following the developing situation of the COVID-19 (coronavirus) pandemic and adapting to the guidelines provided by the UK Government and the NHS.

To keep our clients and team members safe, we have implemented the following across all our talking therapy services, from Monday 30 March 2020 until further notice:

  • If you would like to make a referral to one of our talking therapy services, we encourage you to use our online self-referral forms.
  • We are no longer able to answer direct calls to our services, but we will are checking voicemail messages every 30 minutes during open hours and will respond to any messages directly (this excludes Access Sefton and Talking Helps Newcastle, which will continue to take phone calls).
  • All our assessments are now taking place over the phone.
  • All our therapy sessions will take place over the phone or via Skype.
  • Group therapy sessions have been paused.

We would like to thank you for your support and understanding as we continue to navigate these challenging and uncertain times. We will keep this page updated with any changes to our guidance or service details.

https://www.insighthealthcare.org/our-services/talking-therapies/safety-measures-during-covid-19-outbreak/

Walking for Health - date updated 02/04/2020

It was great to see the message Lynn Yendell has shared with her Walking for Health groups. Lynn is the coordinator at Worcestershire Walking Network and emailed some really useful sources of help and resources, both local and national. These included:

A link to the local authority’s Coronavirus web page and the Council’s advice page to help people look after themselves

The local sports partnership website resources to help people stay active at home

An update about availability of services from local Citizens Advice Service

The Coronavirus Charity Help Fund which has been set up by Martin Lewis to help those affected by the coronavirus. Small or local charities are able to apply to receive a grant of £5-20K for specific coronavirus poverty relief projects.

https://www.walkingforhealth.org.uk/news/2020/03/coronavirus-help-resources-worcestershire-walking-network

Everybody Health - date updated 02/04/2020

If you are worried about Covid-19 and trying to quit smoking to reduce the risk, we can help you by providing virtual stop-smoking sessions.

Dr Nick Hopkinson is a respiratory consultant and, in a video posted on Fresh, says quitting smoking is an important way for individuals to reduce their risk from corona virus because smoking increases the risk of lung infections.

https://www.everyonehealth.co.uk/stop-smoking-virtual-sessions/

Cambridge Adult Learning and Skills - date updated 02/04/2020

Due to the current situation and following government advice on March 16th, we have been required to make some difficult decisions, summarised below. As you can appreciate, this is a fast moving and still developing situation. We will update the information on our social media feeds as it becomes available.

  • Provision in Ely library will cease until further notice, from Thursday 19th March.
  • March Community Centre is closed until further notice, from Tuesday 24th March.
  • All of our courses have now been postponed. If you had enrolled or booked onto a course, our customer service team will be in contact with you shortly, if they haven't already, to discuss further.

Please be aware that our admissions team are contactable to discuss our adult learning opportunities and answer any queries you may have, Monday - Friday, from 8.45am - 5pm, by calling 01353 613013 or emailing Cambsals@cambridgeshire.gov.uk.  You can also find us on Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn.

We appreciate your cooperation.

Stay well & take care, Cambridgeshire Skills

https://www.cambsals.co.uk/

Dhiverse - date updated 02/04/2020

In light of the recent official government advice, Dhiverse staff and volunteers will be working from home as much as possible. Our office will operate on a skeleton staff and is closed to visitors until further notice. Therefore, if you call the office on 01223 508805 you might reach our voicemail but please be assured that we will aim to respond as soon as possible. There will not be any delay in responding to emails to our general email enquiries@dhiverse.org.uk.

We’re pleased to let you know that Public Health Cambridgeshire has made the decision to continue to fund our HIV Support Service,Interact Group, RSE Services and Training & Health Promotion Services for a further 6 months to 1st October 2020. This means that we can continue to provide these services until that date. We want to assure you that although we will not be providing any of our services face to face during this time, we will be here to provide telephone and video call support, information and education. We are continuing to take referrals for most of our services.

https://www.dhiverse.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2020/03/Dhiverse-March-2020-Newsletter-2.pdf

ICASH (Integrated Contraception and Sexual Health Services) - date updated 02/04/2020

To help protect our staff and other service users, please stay at home and self-isolate for 14 days and do not visit our service if you or a member of your household have:

  • a new continuous cough, or,
  • a high temperature (of 37.8 degrees centigrade or higher)

Here is some helpful guidance to help you whilst you are staying at home.  If you have serious symptoms you cannot manage at home, use NHS 111 online (please only call NHS 111 if they cannot get online).

 

Our Services: To reduce the number of people sitting in our waiting rooms and thereby helping to delay the spread of the virus, we are now only delivering essential services in line with national guidance.

This means only emergency contraception and urgent GUM and HIV services. GU/HIV contacts, where identified as emergencies, will be telephone triaged and seen in clinic where appropriate.

Please call us on 0300 300 3030, where our team will discuss the reason for your call, triage (if needed) and advise on next steps. If you do not have symptoms, please contact us again in 12 weeks for screening. If you develop symptoms please call us on 0300 300 3030.

Alternatively, if you have no symptoms but wish to access screening for sexually transmitted infections, you can use our Express Test home testing kit.

https://www.icash.nhs.uk/news/2020/03/16/coronavirus-advice



Invigorate - date updated 02/04/2020

We are putting in place contingency plans to address the impact of the coronavirus outbreak on our services. We remain open for business and will continue to change and adapt our services and as the situation develops.

We will keep this page up to date with news of any changes to our services.

https://www.cambridge.gov.uk/coronavirus-changes-to-our-services


There are lots of things you can do to help yourself stay well and have good wellbeing: including eating well, spending time with others, getting a good night's sleep and taking some regular exercise. Many of the things that are good for our physical health are also good for keeping our minds well too.

Some people find the '5 Ways to Wellbeing' a useful way of thinking about how you can look after your wellbeing:

1. Connect with the people around you and make time for family or friends.                  

2. Be active - Go for a run, play football, cycle to college or sign up for a dance class...whatever it is, make sure it is something you enjoy. 

3. Take notice – Pay attention to your senses – what can you see, feel, taste, smell and hear?

4. Keep learning – Try something new, be it a new recipe or taking up an evening class.

5. Give - Do something nice for a friend, or a stranger. Thank someone. Smile :) Volunteer your time. It can be incredibly rewarding.

Making a few small changes to your lifestyle could make a big difference, these websites might be able to help:

-Lets Get Moving Cambridgeshire LogoLet's Get Moving Cambridgeshire aims to improve the health of the Cambridgeshire population, specifically by increasing levels of physical activity. This will be done by promoting existing opportunities, developing new opportunities, and supporting individuals that require support to achieve their goals.

-One You logo - Whether it’s getting more active, quitting smoking or reducing how much alcohol you drink this website can help!  

 

Want to try out mindfulness? Need a little boost? Then check out the Apps page for a little inspiration! 

*Some information gathered from www.nhs.uk and the services listed.

COVID-19 RESOURCES

Covid-19 / Coronavirus Resources

Due to Coronavirus (COVID-19), a number of services have had to make changes to how they provide support to people.  If you are currently accessing support from a service they will be in touch or please contact them for up to date information about their services.

The First Response Service supports people experiencing a mental health crisis so if you need urgent support please call 111 and choose option 2. The First Response Service provides 24-hour access, seven days a week, 365 days a year, to mental health care, advice, support and treatment.

You may also find the following resources useful for information and advice on how you can look after yourself and those around you...


General advice and information:


Managing mental health and wellbeing:


Talking to children about Coronavirus and supporting their wellbeing:


Guidance for Carers:


Advice around coronavirus and education:


Self-Help

FAQ'S AROUND COVID-19

Below is a list of questions we are being asked regularly and the answers that we have been provided by commissioners and services. 

We hope it is helpful.

  • I access a CPFT service. How do I know what is happening to it right now?

The CPFT have updated their website here. If you cannot see the service you access on here, then it is running as usual with no changes. You should have been contacted by our service if there have been changes. If you are still unsure, please call the service and ask them.

 

  • What are the changes to other services such as Mind, CGL or Lifecraft?

All other services, charities and community groups have updated their websites and contacted people to let them know what is happening. Keep Your Head are updating their website with all service changes and you can find them here Or check the organisations own website.

 

  • What services are available to me?

There is a list of available services here.The SUN Network regularly signpost to services on their Twitter and Facebook accounts @Sunnetworkcambs

 

  • Am I allowed to use my GP surgery for my mental health?

Yes! If you need to see your GP to stay well and prevent a decline in your mental wellbeing, you absolutely must contact them. It is important for you to stay well.

  • What do I do in an emergency? Am I allowed to call an ambulance? 

If you are in a mental health crisis then call NHS 111 option 2. The First Response Service. If your life is in danger and you need to call an ambulance, then you can call 999. It is important to use services when it is appropriate to do so to stay safe.

 

  • How can I stay up to date on Cambridge and Peterborough mental health and drug and alcohol services?

Visit the SUN Network website as we regularly update on what services are providing under our News tab. If you have a question about services, you can call/text/WhatsApp us on 07712 358 172 or email enquiries@sunnetwork.org.uk

All About Mental Health

WHAT IS MENTAL HEALTH?

We all have mental health and we all have to take care of it. It affects how we think, feel and behave as well as determining how we handle stress, relate to others and make choices. Our mental health can change over time. Some people call mental health 'emotional health' or 'wellbeing'.

What are mental health challenges?

Changes in mental health are very common, for example with the stresses and strains of life. But if these changes don’t go away, and start to affect our everyday life, this can lead to challenges with our mental health.  Over the course our lives, if we experience mental health challenges, our thinking, mood, and behaviour can be affected. Many factors contribute to mental health challenges, including our genes and life experiences.

How common are mental health problems?

Anyone can experience challenges with their mental health from mild stress to diagnosable mental health challenges, and it is thought that at any one time at least 1 person in 6 is experiencing a mental health challenge.

Mental health challenges are common but help is available and with the right support many people recover completely. Check out our Support Services for lots of services who are local and national!

*Some information gathered from www.nhs.uk and the services listed.

ANXIETY

What is Anxiety?

Anxiety is a feeling of unease, such as worry or fear, that can be mild or severe.

Everyone has feelings of anxiety at some point in their life – for example, you may feel worried and anxious about sitting an exam, or having a medical test or job interview. During times like these, feeling anxious can be perfectly normal.

However, some people can find it hard to control their worries. Their feelings of anxiety are more constant and can often affect their daily lives. People with anxiety challenges tend to feel anxious most days and often struggle to remember the last time they felt relaxed. As soon as one anxious thought is resolved, another may appear about a different issue.

Anxiety is the main symptom of several conditions, including:

Although feelings of anxiety at certain times are completely normal, see your GP if anxiety is affecting your daily life or causing you distress.

Who can help?

If you feel that you or someone you know could be suffering with anxiety then you can always go to your GP for help; your GP will be able to refer you over to someone who can help you get treatment. You can also self-refer yourself to services that help with Mental Health Challenges to get treatment.

Mental health challenges are common but help is available and with the right support many people recover completely. Check out our Support Services Page for lots of services who are local and national!

*Some information gathered from www.nhs.uk and the services listed.

OCD

What is OCD?

Obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) is a common mental health condition in which a person has obsessive thoughts and compulsive behaviours.

It affects men, women and children and can develop at any age. Some people develop the condition early, often around puberty, but it typically develops during early adulthood.

OCD can be distressing and significantly interfere with your life, but treatment can help you keep it under control.

If you have OCD, you'll usually experience frequent obsessive thoughts and compulsive behaviours.

  • An obsession is an unwanted and unpleasant thought, image or urge that repeatedly enters your mind, causing feelings of anxiety, disgust or unease.
  • A compulsion is a repetitive behaviour or mental act that you feel you need to carry out to try to temporarily relieve the unpleasant feelings brought on by the obsessive thought.

For example, someone with an obsessive fear of their house being burgled may feel they need to check all the windows and doors are locked several times before they can leave the house.

People with OCD can be reluctant to seek help because they feel ashamed or embarrassed. But there's nothing to feel ashamed or embarrassed about. It's a health condition like any other – it doesn't mean you're "mad" and it's not your fault you have it.

Who can help?

If you know someone or yourself is struggling with OCD you can visit your GP who will be able to refer you to someone to get help. You can also refer yourself directly to services that help with OCD and other Mental Health Challenges.

The following sites may be useful sources of support:

OCD Action, OCD-UK and TOP UK can also let you know about any local support groups in your area.

Mental health challenges are common but help is available and with the right support many people recover completely. Check out our Support Services Page for lots of services who are local and national!

*Some information gathered from www.nhs.uk and the services listed.

PHOBIAS

What are Phobias?

A phobia is an overwhelming and debilitating fear of an object, place, situation, feeling or animal.

Phobias are more pronounced than fears. They develop when a person has an exaggerated or unrealistic sense of danger about a situation or object.

If a phobia becomes very severe, a person may organise their life around avoiding the thing that's causing them anxiety. As well as restricting their day-to-day life, it can also cause a lot of distress.

A phobia is a type of anxiety disorder. You may not experience any symptoms until you come into contact with the source of your phobia.

However, in some cases, even thinking about the source of a phobia can make a person feel anxious or panicky. This is known as anticipatory anxiety.

If you don't come into contact with the source of your phobia very often, it may not affect your everyday life.

There are a wide variety of objects or situations that someone could develop a phobia about. However, phobias can be divided into two main categories:

  • Specific or simple phobias
  • Complex phobias

Specific or simple phobias

Specific or simple phobias centre around a particular object, animal, situation or activity. They often develop during childhood or adolescence and may become less severe as you get older.

Common examples of simple phobias include:

  • Animal phobias – such as dogs, spiders, snakes or rodents
  • Environmental phobias – such as heights, deep water and germs
  • Situational phobias – such as visiting the dentist or flying
  • Bodily phobias – such as blood, vomit or having injections
  • Sexual phobias – such as performance anxiety or the fear of getting a sexually transmitted infection 

Complex phobias

Complex phobias tend to be more disabling than simple phobias. They tend to develop during adulthood and are often associated with a deep-rooted fear or anxiety about a particular situation or circumstance.

The two most common complex phobias are:

  • Agoraphobia
  • Social phobia 

Agoraphobia is often thought of as a fear of open spaces, but it's much more complex than this. Someone with agoraphobia will feel anxious about being in a place or situation where escaping may be difficult if they have a panic attack.

Social phobia, also known as social anxiety disorder, centres around feeling anxious in social situations. If you have a social phobia, you might be afraid of speaking in front of people for fear of embarrassing yourself and being humiliated in public. In severe cases, this can become debilitating and may prevent you from carrying out everyday activities, such as eating out or meeting friends.

How common are phobias?

Phobias are the most common type of anxiety disorder.

They can affect anyone, regardless of age, sex and social background. Some of the most common phobias include:

  • Arachnophobia – fear of spiders
  • Claustrophobia  – fear of confined spaces
  • Agoraphobia – fear of open spaces and public places
  • Social phobia  – fear of social situations

Who can help?

If you have a phobia, you should seek help from your GP. They may refer you to a specialist with expertise in behavioural therapy, such as a psychologist. Or you can refer yourself to a service that helps with Mental Health Challenges.

Mental health challenges are common but help is available and with the right support many people recover completely. Check out our Support Services Page for lots of services who are local and national!

*Some information gathered from www.nhs.uk and the services listed.

DEPRESSION

What is Depression?

Depression is more than simply feeling unhappy or fed up for a few days.

Most people go through periods of feeling down, but when you're depressed you feel persistently sad for weeks or months, rather than just a few days.

Some people think depression is trivial and not a genuine health condition. They're wrong – it is a real illness with real symptoms. Depression isn't a sign of weakness or something you can "snap out of" by "pulling yourself together".

The good news is that with the right treatment and support, most people with depression can make a full recovery.

Depression affects people in different ways and can cause a wide variety of symptoms.

They range from lasting feelings of unhappiness and hopelessness, to losing interest in the things you used to enjoy and feeling very tearful. Many people with depression also have symptoms of anxiety. There can be physical symptoms too, such as feeling constantly tired, sleeping badly, having no appetite or sex drive, and various aches and pains. However, some people may have little to no physical symptoms and are functioning professionals dealing with depression.

The symptoms of depression range from mild to severe. At its mildest, you may simply feel persistently low in spirit, while severe depression can make you feel suicidal, that life is no longer worth living. Most people experience feelings of stress, unhappiness or anxiety during difficult times. A low mood may improve after a short period of time, rather than being a sign of depression.

Luckily there are many ways of treating depression, the treatment you may receive will depend on the type of depression you have.

Different Types of Depression and possible treatments:

·         Mild Depression - wait and see, exercise, self-help groups

·         Mild to Moderate Depression - talking treatment, cognitive behavioural therapy, counselling

·         Moderate to Severe Depression – antidepressants, combination therapy, mental health

What are the different treatments?

Wait and see: if you're diagnosed with mild depression, it may improve by itself. In this case, you'll be seen again by your GP after two weeks to monitor your progress. This is known as "watchful waiting".

Exercise: there's evidence that exercise can help depression, and it's one of the main treatments for mild depression. You may be referred to a qualified fitness trainer for an exercise scheme. You can also find out more about starting exercise and exercise for depression.

Self-help groups: talking through your feelings can be helpful. You could talk to a friend or relative, or you can ask your GP to suggest a local self-help group. Find out more about depression support groups. Your GP may also recommend self-help books and online cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT). 

Antidepressants: antidepressants are tablets that treat the symptoms of depression. There are almost 30 different types of antidepressant. They have to be prescribed by a doctor, usually for depression that's moderate or severe.

Combination therapy: your GP may recommend that you take a course of antidepressants plus talking therapy, particularly if your depression is quite severe. A combination of an antidepressant and CBT usually works better than having just one of these treatments.

Mental health teams: if you have severe depression, you may be referred to a mental health team made up of psychologists, psychiatrists, specialist nurses and occupational therapists. These teams often provide intensive specialist talking treatments as well as prescribed medication. 

Talking therapy: there are different types of talking therapy for depression, including cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) and counselling. Your GP can refer you for talking treatment or, in some parts of the country, you might be able to refer yourself. Some talking treatments include; Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT), Online CBT, Interpersonal Therapy (IPT), Psychodynamic Psychotherapy and counselling.

Mindfulness: Mindfulness involves paying closer attention to the present moment, and focusing on your thoughts, feelings, bodily sensations and the world around you to improve your mental wellbeing. The aim is to develop a better understanding of your mind and body, and to learn how to live with more appreciation and less anxiety.

Who can help?

It's important to seek help from your GP if you think you may be depressed. Many people wait a long time before seeking help for depression, but it's best not to delay. The sooner you see a doctor, the sooner you can be on the way to recovery. You can also refer yourself to other services designed to help with depression.

  

Mental health challenges are common but help is available and with the right support many people recover completely. Check out our Support Services Page for lots of services who are local and national!

*Some information gathered from www.nhs.uk and the services listed.

PERI/POSTNATAL MENTAL HEALTH

While many people are aware that you can become depressed after having a baby, it's less well known that many women and men experience anxiety during and after pregnancy. In fact, it's common to experience depression and anxiety together.

Depression and anxiety are the most common mental health challenges during pregnancy, many women and men will experience both. Depression and anxiety also affect 15-20% of women in the first year after childbirth. During pregnancy and the postnatal period, anxiety disorders, including Panic Disorder, Generalised Anxiety Disorder (GAD), Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD), Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) and Tokophobia (an extreme fear of childbirth), can occur on their own or can coexist with depression.

Perinatal anxiety and depression are mental health challenges experienced during pregnancy or in the year after childbirth. You might hear it called:

  • Perinatal or antenatal anxiety and/or depression if you experience anxiety during pregnancy.
  • Postnatal anxiety and/or depression if you experience it after giving birth.

Perinatal mental health challenges are those which occur during pregnancy or in the first year following the birth of a child. Perinatal mental challenges affects 12-20% of women, and covers a wide range of conditions. Me can also suffer with Peri/Postnatal depression and anxiety. If left untreated, it can have significant and long lasting effects on the person and their family. Perinatal mental health challenges can also have long-standing effects on children’s emotional, social and cognitive development.

There are different types of depression and anxiety that can happen during and post-pregnancy:

  • Postpartum ‘blues’: (affecting 60-80% of all new mothers) is often expressed as frequent and prolonged crying, anxiety, irritability, poor sleep, quick mood changes and a sense of vulnerability. It usually occurs within the first three days following birth, continues for up to two weeks and is usually self-limiting.

  • Postpartum depression & anxiety: (affecting 15-20% of all new mothers) is more debilitating and longer lasting than the ‘blues’ and is characterized by despondency, tearfulness and more intense feelings of inadequacy, guilt, anxiety and fatigue. There may also be physical symptoms such as headaches and rapid heart rate. A lack of feeling for the baby is of special concern. These feelings can appear any time during the first few months to one year after the birth. Unfortunately, women experiencing this form of depression rarely seek treatment although almost all respond well.

  • Postpartum post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) following childbirth: is usually triggered by trauma during the time leading up to, during delivery or shortly afterwards. It can effect up to 6% of mothers. The trauma leads the women feeling that either her life or the life of her baby is at risk.

  • Postpartum psychosis:(found in 0.1% of new mothers) is a serious, but relatively rare disorder, with reactions such as extreme confusion, refusal to eat, delusions, auditory hallucinations, hyperactivity and rapid or irrational speech. Most of these reactions occur within 3-14 days following the birth. Psychosis is serious and requires immediate medical attention and at times medication and hospitalization.

How do I know if I have perinatal or postnatal depression or anxiety?

A mother may:

  • Feel constantly tired
  • Cry often for no apparent reason
  • Feel panicky
  • Worry excessively about her own or the baby’s health
  • Have a lack of feeling for the baby
  • Have difficulty sleeping or eating
  • Have problems concentrating
  • Have frightening thoughts or fantasies
  • Feel an overwhelming sense of loss

What are the treatments?

There are a range of treatment options for depression and anxiety, any of which you might find useful to treat perinatal and postnatal anxiety and/or depression.

  • Talking treatments. You're likely to be offered cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) or your local mental health services may run specific counselling or group programmes for anxiety. You can speak to your doctor, or contact your local services to find out what they offer.

  • Self-help resources. Your doctor could give you access to online CBT programmes, or prescribe self-help books to help you learn to manage your anxiety.

  • Medication. There are several different drugs that can be helpful in managing anxiety. If you have any concerns about taking medication during pregnancy or breastfeeding, you can always discuss this with your doctor.

You may be offered a combination of medication and a talking treatment. Many people find that taking medication helps them feel stable enough to get the most out of a talking treatment. However, other people find medication or talking treatments alone are more helpful.

If there are long waiting lists for talking treatments in your area, your doctor may recommend that you try an antidepressant to help you manage your mental health in the meantime.

What can I do to help myself?

Although the best way to treat depression is to seek help from a healthcare professional, there are steps you can take yourself to reduce your chances of developing depression and help you recover once you've been diagnosed.

Try to:

  • look for the positive things in your life, however hard that may seem
  • involve your partner or someone you're close to in your pregnancy and baby
  • make time to relax
  • be open about your feelings
  • ask for help with practical tasks like grocery shopping and household chores
  • find out about local support groups (check out our Who Can Help page)
  • make time to rest
  • eat well  
  • find time to have fun
  • organise small treats every day, such as a workout or a coffee with friends

Try to avoid:

  • doing too much – cut down on other commitments when you're pregnant or caring for a new baby
  • getting involved in stressful situations
  • drinking too much tea, coffee, alcohol or cola, which can stop you sleeping well
  • moving house
  • being too hard on yourself or your partner

If you're looking for other women's pregnancy challenges, here's a link to a life story about a woman who suffered with post-natal anxiety.

Who can help?

  • Anxiety UK - was established to promote the relief and rehabilitation of persons suffering from agoraphobia and associated anxiety disorders, phobias and conditions, in particular, but not exclusively, by raising awareness in such topics.
  • No Panic - No Panic is a registered charity which helps people who suffer from Panic Attacks, Phobias, Obsessive Compulsive Disorders and other related anxiety disorders including those people who are trying to give up Tranquillizers.
  • The NHS - has useful information and tips on how to cope with perinatal and postnatal depression and anxiety.
  • Tommy's - are an organisation that provides accredited midwife-led pregnancy health information for parents-to-be, and funds research into the causes of pregnancy loss.
  • PANDAS - Pre And Post Natal Depression Advice and Support (PANDAS) help support and advise any parent who is experiencing a perinatal mental illness.  They also inform and guide family members, carers, friends and employers as to how they can support someone who is suffering.
  • CPSL MIND - Mind have lots of helpful advice and information online about the different kinds of support you can get and they also run lots of workshops and courses. If you would like to self refer to Mind, We have added their Referral Form here and a link to their different services and referral forms!
  • CPSL MIND have several services available, for example: 

Connecting Mums, 6 week short intervention courses for mums who are socially isolated, this course also offers tips and tools on management and prevention for mental wellbeing. Mums can bring along their babies to the sessions and we have volunteers on hand to help look after the children while mum interacts in a group environment, babies are in the same room as mums. We deliver these from a number of different children’s centres in Peterborough.

Mums Matter, 8 week targeted intervention course, this course is for Mums who are that bit more poorly, we deliver the courses in children’s centres and pay for a crèche for the children, the crèche is always in the same building as the mums and we work with the mums in a separate room, this course is designed to help mums manage the everyday and dispel the myths. We use tools such as CBT, mindfulness, meditation and work on self-esteem.

We are launching a Mums Monthly Peers Support group that will be starting on the 2nd July 2018, this will be held at First Steps Children’s Centre, it will take place on the first Monday of each month from 1000 – 1200, this is a peer led support group and the volunteers that lead the group have accessed our services. Mums can bring children along to the group.

CPSL MIND can accept Mums who are pregnant and have a child who is up to 2 years old, Mums can self-refer by contacting them on 01733 362990 or they can accept professional or other organisations referrals.

Local Support - Cambridgeshire and Peterborough Local Authority Support: 

  • Health Visiting service– The health visiting service is a universal-progressive, needs-led, evidence-based service for children to age 5 years and their families, delivered by specialist community public health nurses.

    Family Nurse Partnership- The Family Nurse Partnership (FNP) is a structured home visiting parenting programme, delivered by specially trained family nurses, from early pregnancy until the child is two years old to vulnerable teenage mothers. The family nurse and the young parent(s) commit to an average of 64 planned home visits over two and a half years.

    Peterborough Connecting Mums- Cambridgeshire, Peterborough & South Lincolnshire MIND (formerly Peterborough & Fenland MIND) deliver perinatal mental health programmes. Peterborough City Council have commissioned this organisation to deliver 5 perinatal mental health programmes per annum (Connecting Mums & Mums Matter), which have been specifically designed, piloted and evidenced by CPSL MIND.

    Presently, the programmes only operate in Peterborough and have an annual reach target of 45 women, although some partners/family members are also supported in a 'supporter' session, which is part of the Mums Matter course. From a commissioning perspective, the local authority are continuing to invest in this for the 2018/19 financial year, however ongoing funding is unclear; it is anticipated that this need will be picked up through the Better Births transformation.

    Early Help Hub - Single point of contact for all Early Help Assessments, Family Plans and Reviews that have been completed by any agency. Here's the Cambridge County Council Support Hub website.

    Child & Family Centres/Children’s centres- Deliver evidence-based parenting programmes and targeted support for Domestic Abuse in conjunction with the Early Help offer.

    Health Improvement antenatal- Address lifestyle/behavioural factors- smoking, diet & obesity, physical activity, drugs & alcohol, sexual health. Delivered by Everyone Health  in Cambridgeshire and Solutions for Health in Peterborough.

Mental health challenges are common but help is available and with the right support many people recover completely. Check out our Support Services Page for lots of services who are local and national!

*Some information gathered from www.nhs.uk and the services listed.

SELF-HARM

What is Self-Harm?

Self-harm is when someone chooses to inflict pain on themselves in some way. It is a sign of distress and can take many forms. Often self-harm is someone's way of coping with feelings and is a sign that something is wrong. Self-harm can be dangerous, and it is a sign that there is an underlying problem, therefore you should get help.

It is important to realise that self-harm is not the same as suicide, with self-harm there is not always an intention to end life like in suicide. The intention is more often to punish themselves, express their distress or relieve unbearable tension. Sometimes the reason is a mixture of both. Although the intention may not be to end life when self-harming, it is important to still get help.

Treatment for people who self-harm usually involves seeing a therapist to discuss your thoughts and feelings, and how these affect your behaviour and wellbeing. They can also teach you coping strategies to help prevent further episodes of self-harm. If you're badly depressed, it could also involve taking antidepressants or other medication.

Who can help?

If you're self-harming, you should see your GP for help. They can refer you to healthcare professionals at a local community mental health service for further assessment. This assessment will result in your care team working out a treatment plan with you to help with your distress.

Below are some organisations that give more information on ways to cope with self-harm, you can also speak to your GP for further support.

There are organisations that offer support and advice for people who self-harm, as well as their friends and families. These include:

 

Mental health challenges are common but help is available and with the right support many people recover completely. Check out our Support Services Page for lots of services who are local and national!

*Some information gathered from www.nhs.uk and the services listed.

SEXUAL & DOMESTIC VIOLENCE

What is Sexual Violence?

Sexual assault is any sexual act that a person did not consent to, or is forced into against their will. It is a form of sexual violence and includes rape (an assault involving penetration of the vagina, anus or mouth), or other sexual offences, such as groping, forced kissing, child sexual abuse or the torture of a person in a sexual manner.
Sexual assault is an act that is carried out without the victim’s active consent. This means they didn’t agree to it. It is not uncommon for a victim of sexual assault to have no physical injuries or signs of their assault. But sexual assault is still a crime and can be reported to the police in the same way as other crimes.

What to do if you need help:

If you've been sexually assaulted, there are services that can help. You don’t have to report the assault to police if you don’t want to. You may need time to think about what has happened to you. However, consider getting medical help as soon as possible, because you may be at risk of pregnancy or sexually transmiitted infections (STIs). If you want the crime to be investigated, the sooner a forensiic medical examination takes place, the better.

Try not to wash or change your clothes immediately after a sexual assault. This may destroy forensic evidence that could be important if you decide to report the assault to the police.

The following services will also provide treatment or support, and can refer you to another service if you need more specialist help (such as a sexual assault referral centre also referred to as SARC):

Sexual assault referral centres (SARCs) offer medical, practical and emotional support. They have specially trained doctors, nurses and support workers to care for you.

What is Domestic Abuse? 

Domestic violence or abuse can happen to anyone. Domestic violence, also called domestic abuse, includes physical, emotional and sexual abuse in couple relationships or between family members.

Domestic violence can happen against women and against men, and anybody can be an abuser. If you're worried someone might see you have been on this page, find out how to cover your tracks online.

Signs of domestic violence and abuse

These are different kinds of abuse, but it's always about having power and control over you. If you answer yes to any of the following questions, you might be in an abusive relationship. 

Emotional Abuse

Does your partner ever: 

belittle you, or put you down?
blame you for the abuse or arguments?
deny that abuse is happening, or play it down?
isolate you from your family and friends?
stop you going to college or work?
make unreasonable demands for your attention?
accuse you of flirting or having affairs?
tell you what to wear, who to see, where to go, and what to think?
control your money, or not give you enough to buy food or other essential things?
Physical Abuse

Does your partner ever:

threaten to hurt or kill you?
destroy things that belong to you?
stand over you, invade your personal space?
threaten to kill themselves or the children?
read your emails, texts or letters?
harass or follow you?

Sexual Abuse

Sexual abuse can happen to anyone, whether they're male or female.

Does your partner ever:

touch you in a way you don't want to be touched?
make unwanted sexual demands?
hurt you during sex?
pressure you to have unsafe sex – for example, not using a condom?
pressure you to have sex?

If you decide to leave

The first step in escaping an abusive situation is realising that you're not alone and it's not your fault. If you're considering leaving, be careful who you tell. It's important your partner doesn't know where you're going.

Before you go, try to get advice from an organisation such as:

Services here to help:

  • Cambridge Rape Crisis Centre - Deliver a range of support services to women and children in Cambridgeshire who are survivors of rape, sexual abuse and violence.

  • Peterborough Rape Crisis Centre is committed to supporting and empowering female survivors of rape and sexual abuse, regardless of race, ethnicity, sexuality, age and other discriminatory factors respecting individual lifestyles through the provision of a confidential telephone help line, a face to face support service and other appropriate support mechanisms.

  • Victim Support - As an independent charity, we work towards a world where people affected by crime or traumatic events get the support they need and the respect they deserve. We help people feel safer and find the strength to move beyond crime. Our support is free, confidential and tailored to your needs.

  • The Survivors Trust - Living with the consequences of rape and sexual abuse can be devastating. At TST, we believe that all survivors are entitled to receive the best possible response to their needs whether or not they choose to report.

  • Women's Aid - We believe everyone has the human right to live in safety and free from violence and abuse. Women are the overwhelming majority of victims of domestic abuse. Domestic abuse is a violation of women and their children’s human rights. It is the result of an abuse of power and control, and is rooted in the historical status and inequality of women in in society.

  • Survivors UK - We offer individual counselling, group work and helpline services from our base in Shadwell, London E1 for men who have been victims of domestic and sexual abuse.

  • GALOP - LGBT+ anti-violence charity. If you’ve experienced hate crime, sexual violence or domestic abuse, we’re here for you. We also support lesbian, gay, bi, trans and queer people who have had problems with the police or have questions about the criminal justice system.

  • Men's Advice Line - helpline: 0808 801 0327 (Mon to Fri: 9am to 5pm), info@mensadviceline.org.uk, Confidential helpline for all men (in heterosexual or same-sex relationships) experiencing domestic violence by a current or ex-partner.

  • Respect - helpline: 0808 802 4040 (Mon to Fri: 9am to 5pm), info@respectphoneline.org.uk, Runs support services and programmes for people who inflict violence in relationships, including young men and women. Also runs the men's advice line, as above.

  • The Hide Out - Women's Aid website to help young people understand domestic abuse, and how to take positive action if it's happening to them.

  • The Forced Marriage Unit - helpline: 020 7008 0151, fmu@fco.gov.uk, Joint initiative between the Foreign Office and Home Office. It assists actual and potential victims of forced marriage, as well as professionals working in the social, educational and health sectors.

  • Ashiana Sheffield - helpline: 0114 255 5740, info@ashianasheffield.org.uk, aims to help prevent murder and serious harm to black, Asian, minority ethnic and refugee women in England, Wales and Scotland as a result of domestic abuse and forced marriage and 'honor'-based violence. Also supports children and young people.

Mental health challenges are common but help is available and with the right support many people recover completely. Check out our Support Services Page for lots of services who are local and national!

 

*Some information gathered from www.nhs.uk and the services listed.

VICTIMS & WITNESSES

Being a victim of a crime and witnessing a crime can be very traumatic. This can cause harm to your mental health, this can happen instantly or develop over time. Getting help is nothing to be ashamed of. 

If you report a crime you will be asked questions to find out how you have been affected by the crime. You may be asked about your personal circumstances to help identify if there is any additional support that you might need and to understand how you'd prefer to be contacted thereafter.

You will usually receive either a letter with information about the support available to you as a victim of crime, or a telephone call from a skilled victim and witness care coordinator.  They will work with you to assess your needs and create a personalised plan to help you cope and recover from the effects of crime. They will also ensure you receive your entitlements under the Victim’s Code of Practice, acting as your single point of contact, should you need them.

This support is also available to victims who do not wish to report a crime. If you have been a victim of a crime but don't want to report it, you can still speak with a member of the Victims and Witness’ Support coordinators. You can also go online to your local authority and they will have a victim and witness information and support area for you.

Everyone copes with the after-effects of crime differently and can vary from person to person depending on their personality, the support of friends and family and their personal circumstances. All reactions to crimes are completely normal and you should not be embarrassed.

Anyone can become a victim of crime. A victim is defined as “a person who has been harmed (physically, financially or emotionally), injured or killed as a result of a crime, accident or other event or action”. The definition of a victim can also include;

  • Families or friends of a person who has died as a result of criminal conduct
  • Families or friends of victims in fatal road collisions
  • Nominated representatives of a business that has been the subject of a criminal activity.

If you have seen or been a victim of a crime, you will be called a witness. As a witness, you play a vital role in helping solve crimes and deliver justice. The criminal justice system cannot work without witnesses and are the most important part in bringing offenders to justice. Witnesses can be:

  • Victims of crime
  • Someone who saw a crime or incident
  • Someone who knows something about a crime or incident
  • Someone with specialist knowledge
  • Someone who knows someone involved in a case, known as a character witness.

There are lots of support services out here for you; the different support services will be able to offer advice and support to help you manage your mental health challenges, we listed a few below:

The Cambridgeshire Constabulary - Provides a Hub of support and advice for victims and witnesses to help them get through the after-effects of crimes.

Cambridgshire & Peterborough Victim Services - You don't need to have reported your crime to the Police to receive support. For free, confidential and tailored advice on which service can best suit you you can visit this website.

Victim Support (VS) - Give you the support you need to move forward. Our services are free, confidential and available to anyone in England and Wales, regardless of whether the crime has been reported or how long ago it happened. Choose from a number of ways to contact us.

GOV Website - Get free help and advice if you’ve been a victim of crime.

You & Co - You & Co is Victim Support’s youth programme that helps young people cope with the impact and effects of crime. You do not have to report the crime to the police to get support from us.

Crime Stoppers UK - an independent charity helping law enforcement to locate criminals and help solve crimes. We have an anonymous 24/7 phone number, 0800 555 111, that people can call to pass on information about crime; alternatively people can send us information anonymously via our Giving Information Form. You don't have to give your name or any of your personal details. We do not trace calls or track IP addresses.

SAMM - SAMM is a national UK Charity (No 1000598) supporting families bereaved by Murder and Manslaughter. We also provide advice and training to many agencies on issues relevant to the traumatically bereaved.

Karma Nirvana - is an award-winning British human rights charity supporting victims of honour-based abuse and forced marriage. Honour crimes are not determined by age, faith, gender or sexuality, we support and work with all victims.

SARI Stand Against Racism & Inequality (SARI) is a service user/community-oriented agency that provides support and advice to victims of hate, and promotes equality and good relations between people with protected characteristics as defined by law. Most SARI staff have some direct experience of dealing with hate motivated behaviour and all staff have a clear understanding of and commitment to the objectives of SARI.

Stone Wall - We're here to let all lesbian, gay, bi and trans people, here and abroad, know they're not alone. We believe we're stronger united, so we partner with organisations that help us create real change for the better. We have laid deep foundations across Britain - in some of our greatest institutions - so our communities can continue to find ways to flourish, and individuals can reach their full potential. We’re here to support those who can’t yet be themselves.

FASO - FASO is a voluntary organisation dedicated to supporting anyone affected by false allegations of abuse. False allegations affect people in all walks of life, in personal or professional contexts, and often without any warning or forewarning.  FASO is here to support you.

Murdered Abroad - A support group for families, partners and friends of the victims of murder and manslaughter abroad.

True Vision - True Vision is here to give you information about hate crime or incidents and how to report it. On this website, you can find out what hate crimes or hate incidents are, find out about the ways you can report them, report using the online form and find information about people that can help and support you if you have been a victim.

Equality Human Rights - We are an independent statutory body with the responsibility to encourage equality and diversity, eliminate unlawful discrimination, and protect and promote the human rights of everyone in Britain. The Commission enforces equality legislation on age, disability, gender reassignment, marriage and civil partnership, pregnancy and maternity, race, religion or belief, sex and sexual orientation – these are known as protected characteristics.

Hundred Families - Offer accurate information and practical advice for families bereaved by people with mental health problems along with evidence based resources for mental health professionals and others interested in serious violence by the mentally ill.

Support Line - SupportLine provides a confidential telephone helpline offering emotional support to any individual on any issue. The Helpline is primarily a preventative service and aims to support people before they reach the point of crisis. It is particularly aimed at those who are socially isolated, vulnerable, at risk groups and victims of any form of abuse.

Suzy Lamplugh - Our mission is to reduce the risk of violence and aggression through campaigning, education and support. We help and support people to stay safe from violence and aggression through the provision of free safety tips, managing the National Stalking Helpline and delivering community projects.

Action Fraud - Action Fraud is the UK’s national reporting centre for fraud and cyber crime where you should report fraud if you have been scammed, defrauded or experienced cyber crime.

British Transport Police - We police Britain’s railways, providing a service to rail operators, their staff and passengers across the country. This website provides advice, information and support to anyone who has been affected by a crime whilst on British Transport.

Mental health challenges are common but help is available and with the right support many people recover completely. Check out our Support Services Page for lots of services who are local and national!

*Some information gathered from www.nhs.uk and the services listed.

PTSD

What is PTSD?

Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a type of anxiety disorder which you may develop after being involved in, or witnessing, traumatic events. The condition was first recognized in war veterans and has been known by a variety of names, such as 'shell shock'. But it's not only diagnosed in soldiers – a wide range of traumatic experiences can cause PTSD.

When is it diagnosed?

When you go through something you find traumatic it's understandable to experience some symptoms associated with PTSD afterwards, such as feeling numb or having trouble sleeping. This is sometimes described as an 'acute stress reaction'.

Many people find that these symptoms disappear within a few weeks, but if your symptoms last for longer than a month, you might be given a diagnosis of PTSD. Your GP might refer you to a specialist before this if your symptoms are particularly severe.

Are there different types of PTSD?

If you are given a diagnosis of PTSD, you might be told that you have mild, moderate or severe PTSD. This explains what sort of impact your symptoms are having on you currently – it's not a description of how frightening or upsetting your experiences might have been.

PTSD may be described differently in some situations:

  • Delayed-onset PTSD – if your symptoms emerge more than six months after experiencing trauma, this might be described as 'delayed PTSD' or 'delayed-onset PTSD'.
  • Complex PTSD – if you experienced trauma at an early age or it lasted for a long time, you might be given a diagnosis of 'complex PTSD'. (See our page on complex PTSD for more information.)
  • Birth trauma – PTSD that develops after a traumatic experience of childbirth is also known as 'birth trauma'. (See our page on PTSD and birth trauma for more information.)

There are lots of misconceptions about PTSD. For example, people may wrongly assume it means you are 'dwelling' on past events. They might even suggest that you should 'get over it' or 'move on'. But having PTSD isn't a choice or a sign of weakness, and it's important to remember that you are not alone.

For more information you can visit the following websites:

  • NHS - NHS website with helpful info on PTSD and other mental health issues.

  • PTSD UK - PTSD UK is a charity which aims to educate and raise awareness of Post Traumatic Stress Disorder; it's causes, symptoms and the treatments available, to help everyone experiencing PTSD.

  • The Warriors Journey - This service focuses on helping people who are ex-forces with their ptsd. The vision of The Warrior’s Journey is that warriors and their families will live in wholeness and be equipped to navigate the issues of life.

  • Anxiety UK - Anxiety UK was established to promote the relief and rehabilitation of persons suffering from agoraphobia and associated anxiety disorders, phobias and conditions, in particular, but not exclusively, by raising awareness in such topics.

 

Mental health challenges are common but help is available and with the right support many people recover completely. Check out our Support Services Page for lots of services who are local and national!

*Some information gathered from www.nhs.uk and the services listed.

DRUG/ALCOHOL ABUSE

What is Drug and Alcohol Abuse?

Drug and Alcohol abuse is when someone is addicted to taking drugs or drinking or both, and cannot stop taking drugs/drinking when they choose as it is more than a matter of willpower.

Many people do not understand why people become addicted to drugs and alcohol. They mistakenly view drug abuse and addiction as strictly a social problem and may characterize those who take drugs or drink as morally weak. One very common belief is that drink/drug abusers should be able to just stop taking drugs if they are only willing to change their behavior. This is not the case.

What people often underestimate is the complexity of drug and drink addiction. It is a disease that impacts the brain, and because of that, stopping drink and drug abuse is not simply a matter of willpower. Through scientific advances we now know much more about how exactly drugs work in the brain, and we also know that drug and drink addiction can be successfully treated to help people who want to stop abusing drugs/alcohol and live a full happy life.

Some people become addicted to drugs and alcohol due to many reasons. They may suffer from other mental health challenges, for example; depression, and the only way they feel like themselves again is by drinking or taking drugs. There’s a different story behind every drink/drug addiction and all of them are valid. What is also important is wanting to get help and finding services that will allow you to get help.

Who can help?

Your GP is a good place to start. They can discuss your problems with you and get you into treatment. They may offer you treatment at the practice or refer you to your local drink or drug service.

If you're not comfortable talking to your GP, you can approach your local drug/drink treatment service yourself.

Drug Addiction Treatments

Depending on your personal circumstances and also what you're addicted to, when you seek help you may be given a keyworker who will work with you to plan the right treatment for you

There are different types of treatment available. These include

·         Residential treatment – Residential treatment involves living at a facility and getting away from work, school, family, friends, and addiction triggers while undergoing intensive treatment. Residential treatment can last from a few days to several months.

·         Day treatment/Partial hospitalization – Partial hospitalization is for people who require ongoing medical monitoring but wish to still live at home and have a stable living environment. These treatment programs usually meet at a treatment center for 7 to 8 hours during the day, then you return home at night.

·         Outpatient treatment – Not a live-in treatment program, these outpatient programs can be scheduled around work or school. You’re treated during the day or evening but don’t stay overnight. The major focus is relapse prevention.

·         Sober living communities – Living in a sober house normally follows an intensive treatment program such as residential treatment. You live with other recovering addicts in a safe, supportive, and drug-free environment. Sober living facilities are useful if you have nowhere to go or you’re worried that returning home too soon will lead to relapse

Within your treatment, there is likely to be therapies and other treatments to help you get clean. These may include: 

·         Talking therapies – talking therapies, such as cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT), help you to see how your thoughts and feelings affect your behavior.

·         Treatment with medicines – if you are dependent on heroin or another opioid drug, you may be offered a substitute drug, such as methadone. This means you can get on with your treatment without having to worry about withdrawing or buying street drugs.

·         Detoxification (detox) – this is for people who want to stop taking opioid drugs like heroin completely. It helps you to cope with the withdrawal symptoms.

·         Self-help – some people find support groups like Narcotics Anonymous helpful. Your keyworker can tell you where your nearest group is. 

·         Reducing harm – your drugs workers will help you reduce the risks associated with your drug-taking. You may be offered testing and treatment for hepatitis or HIV, for example.

Where will you have your treatment?

You may have your treatment while living at home or as a hospital inpatient.

If your drug-related problems are severe or complicated you may be referred to a residential rehab.

For more information about residential rehab, or to find a rehab near you, you can visit rehabonline.

Drink Addiction Treatments

 The treatment options for alcohol misuse depend on the extent of your drinking and whether you're trying to drink less (moderation) or give up drinking completely (abstinence). It is a good idea to go your GP and talk to them about your concerns and goals. Your GP may suggest different types of assessment and support options available to you such as from the local community alcohol services. You can also ask about any free local support groups and other alcohol counselling that may suit you.

If you are worried about your drinking, you may be offered a short counselling session known as a brief intervention. A brief intervention lasts about 5 to 10 minutes, and covers risks associated with your pattern of drinking, advice about reducing the amount you drink, alcohol support networks available to you, and any emotional issues around your drinking

Moderation or Abstinence

Moderation or abstinence are treatment options if you're: 

·         Regularly drinking more than the lower-risk daily levels of alcohol – 14 units a week

·         Experiencing health problems directly related to alcohol

·         Unable to function without alcohol (alcohol dependency) 

Cutting alcohol out completely will have a greater health benefit. However, moderation is often a more realistic goal, or at least a first step on the way to abstinence.

Ultimately, the choice is yours, but there are circumstances where abstinence is strongly recommended, including if you

·         Have liver damage, such as liver disease or cirrhosis

·         Have other medical problems, such as heart disease, that can be made worse by drinking

·         Are taking medication that can react badly with alcohol, such as antipsychotics

·         Are pregnant or planning to become pregnant

Abstinence may also be recommended if you've previously been unsuccessful with moderation.

If you choose moderation, you'll probably be asked to attend further counselling sessions so your progress can be assessed, and further treatment and advice can be provided if needed. You may also have regular blood tests so the health of your liver can be carefully monitored. 

Your treatment may include

·         Alcohol Detoxification:

If you need medication to help you stop drinking, it can often be taken at home or when attending a local service daily.

However, some people will need a short stay in a 24-hour medically-supported unit so they can receive safe treatment of their withdrawal symptoms or other problems.

This may be in an NHS inpatient unit, or in a medically-supported residential service, depending on your situation and the assessed medical need. 

·         Intensive Rehabilitation:

Some people are assessed as needing intensive rehabilitation and recovery support for a period after they stop drinking completely; either through attending a programme of intensive support in their local community or by attending a residential rehabilitation service.

This type of intensive treatment is usually reserved for people with medium or high levels of alcohol dependence, and particularly those who have received other forms of help previously that have not been successful.

Who can help?

There are a number of specialist alcohol services that provide help and support for people with a dependence on alcohol or drugs and their friends and family.

  • Drinkline - is the national alcohol helpline. If you're worried about your own or someone else's drinking, you can call this free helpline, in complete confidence. Call 0300 123 1110 (weekdays 9am – 8pm, weekends 11am – 4pm).
  • CGL: Change Grow Live - provide help and support to adults, children, young people and families. There services cover a wide variety of areas including health and wellbeing, substance use, mental health, criminal justice, domestic abuse and homelessness. You can download and fill out their referral form here and a leaflet about the services here.

Recovery Motivators - Recovery champions are fundamental to the on-going support of service users accessing treatment. Inclusion is constantly seeking to utililise the skills of those individuals having experienced treatment and who are committed to recovery. If you feel you would like to support others in treatment please click here.

  • Narcotics Anonymous - A non-profit fellowship or society of men and women for whom drugs had become a major problem. We are recovering addicts who meet regularly to help each other stay clean. This is a program of complete abstinence from all drugs. The only requirement for membership is to stop using.
  • Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) - is a free self-help group. Its "12-step" programme involves getting sober with the help of regular support groups.
  • Al-Anon Family Groups - offer support and understanding to the families and friends of problem drinkers, whether they're still drinking or not.
  • Cocaine Anonymous - Cocaine Anonymous is a fellowship of men and women who share their experience, strength and hope with each other so that they may solve their common problem and help others to recover from their addiction. The only requirement for membership is a desire to stop using cocaine and all other mind-altering substances. There are no dues or fees for membership; we are fully self supporting through our own contributions.
  • Marijuana Anonymous - is a fellowship of people who share our experience, strength, and hope with each other that we may solve our common problem and help others to recover from marijuana addiction. “We who are marijuana addicts? We know the answer to this question. Marijuana controls our lives! We lose interest in all else; our dreams go up in smoke.”
  • Talk to Frank - support line for anyone with questions/concerns surrounding drugs.

  • Down Your Drink, which provides interactive web-based support to help people to drink more safely.
  • Nacoa, which provides information, advice and support for anyone affected by a parent’s drinking.
  • Aspire - Aspire is available to provide support for those with substance misuse issues and support for their families and carers within the Peterborough area.

  • Addaction - is a UK-wide treatment agency that helps individuals, families and communities to manage the effects of drug and alcohol misuse.

  • Adfam - is a national charity working with families affected by drugs and alcohol. Adfam operates an online message board and database of local support groups.

  • The National Association for Children of Alcoholics (Nacoa) - provides a free, confidential telephone and email helpline for children of alcohol-dependent parents and others concerned with their welfare. Call 0800 358 3456 for the Nacoa helpline.
  • SMART Recovery - groups help participants decide whether they have a problem, build up their motivation to change and offer a set of proven tools and techniques to support recovery.
  • CASUS (Cambridgeshire Child & Adolescent Substance Use Service) - Telephone: 01480 445316 Email at: casus@cpft.nhs.uk
  • Recovery Cafes : free, regular, no appointments needed, drop-in cafes where you can find lots of information on recovery from drug and alcohol use, chats with others in recovery and enjoy a tea or coffee.

    Cambridge: The Edge Café, Brookfield NHS Site, Mill Rd, CB1 3DF, Every Thursday 12-3pm

    Ely: The Countess Free Church, Ely, Every Monday 10am – 12pm

 

There are lots of tips and tricks to help you stay in control of your drinking, whatever the situation. What are your drinking levels like? Find out here:

You’ll find lots of tips, and other information here:

Downloadable Mobile Apps:

Use the NHS Choices interactive tools to calculate alcohol units, assess your drinking levels and track your drinking over time.

  • iPhone tracker - If you have an iPhone or iPod touch you can download the drinks tracker from the iTunes app store for free.

 

Mental health challenges are common but help is available and with the right support many people recover completely. Check out our Support Services Page for lots of services who are local and national!

*Some information gathered from www.nhs.uk and the services listed.

EATING DISORDERS

What are eating disorders?

Eating disorders are a range of conditions that can affect someone physically, psychologically and socially, regardless of gender, age or size. A person with an eating disorder may focus excessively on their weight and shape, leading them to make unhealthy choices about food with damaging results to their health.

Although serious, eating disorders are treatable conditions and full recovery is possible. The sooner someone gets the treatment they need, the more likely they are to make a full recovery. Eating disorders are complex; there’s no single cause and not all symptoms will apply to all people.

Anorexia Nervosa and Bulimia Nervosa are the most commonly spoke about eating disorders. However, there are several types of eating disorders and all of them are important.

Some of the main eating disorders are as follows:

  • Anorexia Nervosa -

People who have anorexia try to keep their weight as low as possible by not eating enough food or exercising too much, or both. This can make them very ill because they start to starve. They often have a distorted image of their bodies, thinking they are fat even when they are underweight. Men and women of any age can get anorexia, but it's most common in young women and typically starts in the mid-teens. 

  • Bulimia Nervosa - 

People who have bulimia go through periods where they eat a lot of food in a very short amount of time (binge eating) and then make themselves sick, use laxatives (medication to help them go to the toilet) or do excessive exercise, or a combination of these, to try to stop themselves gaining weight. Men and women of any age can get bulimia, but it's most common in young women and typically starts in the mid to late teens.

  • Binge Eating Disorder - 

Binge eating disorder involves regularly eating large portions of food all at once until you feel uncomfortably full, and then often upset or guilty. Binges are often planned in advance and the person may buy "special" binge foods. Men and women of any age can get binge eating disorder, but it typically starts in the late teens or early 20s.

  • Orthorexia -

It is currently not recognised in a clinical setting as a separate eating disorder, so you would not be officially diagnosed with “orthorexia” at the doctors, but the term would likely be brought up in discussion. Orthorexia refers to an unhealthy obsession with eating “pure” food. Food considered “pure” or “impure” can vary from person to person. This doesn’t mean that anyone who subscribes to a healthy eating plan or diet is suffering from orthorexia. As with other eating disorders, the eating behaviour involved – “healthy” or “clean” eating in this case – is used to cope with negative thoughts and feelings, or to feel in control. Someone using food in this way might feel extremely anxious or guilty if they eat food they feel is unhealthy.

  • Other Specified Feeding or Eating Disorder (OSFED) - 

It is common for symptoms to not fit with the exact diagnostic criteria for anorexia, bulimia, or binge eating disorder, so it is classed as an OSFED – OSFED accounts for a large percentage of eating disorders.

Examples of OSFED's are: 

-  Atypical anorexia – where someone has all the symptoms a doctor looks for to diagnose anorexia, except their weight remains within a “normal” range.

-  Bulimia nervosa (of low frequency and/or limited duration) – where someone has all of the symptoms of bulimia, except the binge/purge cycles don’t happen as often or over as long a period of time as doctors would expect.

-  Binge eating disorder (of low frequency and/or limited duration) – where someone has all of the symptoms of binge eating disorder, except the binges don’t happen as often or over as long a period of time as doctors would expect.

-  Purging disorder – where someone purges, for example by being sick or using laxatives, to affect their weight or shape, but this isn’t as part of binge/purge cycles.

-  Night eating syndrome – where someone repeatedly eats at night, either after waking up from sleep, or by eating a lot of food after their evening meal.

 

Eating disorders do not always involve the physical aspect of being thin, someone with a normal or high BMI may still have an eating disorder; you just may not be able to see it. If you or someone you know could be suffering with an eating disorder, it is important to get help. You can always go to your GP who can pass you on to services and people who can give you support and advice.

 The Centre for Clinical Interventions has several resources available for self help and help for others struggling with an eating disorder along with helpful guidance with other mental health challenges.

Who can help?

If you are worried that you may have an eating disorder, visit your GP for support and access the following websites for more information:

  • Beat – has a range of services including a helpline and access to chat groups that can offer support if you are living with an eating disorder, or if you are supporting someone through recovery.

  • SEED - We are a group of ordinary people with first hand experience of eating disorders, who make a difference to those people whose lives are blighted by this devastating illness. All services can be accessed through self-referral. We provide support and services for people living in Hull East Riding and Out of Area.

  • MGEDT (Men Get Eating Disorders Too) - Men Get Eating Disorders Too’ is an award winning national charity dedicated to representing and supporting the needs of men with eating disorders. They provide essential information that is specific to the unique needs of men and an online space for men to get their voices heard as well as offer peer support via our forum.

  • Overeaters Anonymous - Overeaters Anonymous is a fellowship of individuals who, through shared experience, strength and hope are recovering from compulsive overeating. Welcomes everyone who wants to stop eating compulsively.

  • Weight Concern - The charity is committed to developing and researching new treatments for obesity. It is also working to increase the availability of the successful treatments it has pioneered in the UK via self-help programmes, self-help support groups and family based childhood obesity treatment.

  • Weight Wise - managed by the British Dietetic Association (BDA), with unbiased, easy-to-follow hints and tips - based on the latest evidence - to help you manage your weight for good. It will help you take a look at your current eating habits and physical activity levels, and offer a practical approach to setting your own goals for lifestyle change.

  • British Nutrition Foundation - Promotes the wellbeing of society through the impartial interpretation and effective dissemination of scientifically based knowledge and advice on the relationship between diet, physical activity and health.

  • Recover Your Life - One of the biggest and best Self Harm Support Communities on the Internet, offers help on a variety of topics surrounding self harm, including self injury, eating disorders, mental health issues, abuse and bullying, as well as drugs and alcohol and first aid.

  • The Mix - The Mix is a website for young adults. It has advice and will help you take on any challenge you’re facing - from mental health, eating disorders to money, from homelessness to finding a job, from break-ups to drugs. Talk to them via online, social or their free confidential helpline.

 

Mental health challenges are common but help is available and with the right support many people recover completely. Check out our Support Services Page for lots of services who are local and national!

*Some information gathered from www.nhs.uk and the services listed.

SOCIAL ISOLATION

What Is Social Isolation?

Spending time alone is a good thing, and some people require more alone time than others. Introverts, for example, enjoy spending lots of time alone and can feel drained through social interaction, whereas extroverts prefer the company of others and are recharged through social interaction.

Social isolation is typically considered unhealthy when people spend excessive time alone, particularly when they no longer benefit from time spent alone. Socially isolating oneself can mean staying home for days, not talking with friends or acquaintances, and generally avoiding contact with other people. Any form of contact, however limited, is likely to remain superficial and brief, while more meaningful, extended relationships are missing.

Social isolation can increase a person’s feelings of low self-worth, shame, loneliness, depression, and other mental health concerns. Isolation itself is not a diagnosis, but it can be a symptom of depression, social anxiety, or agoraphobia. Other things that impair social skills can lead to isolation, though not necessarily by choice, for example; physical disabilities, homelessness or hoarding.

When deciding to tackle your isolation, remember to take it slowly. You could try:

  • You can start by going somewhere where you won’t be expected to talk to people but still be around them, like going to the cinema.
  • Talk to your GP, you may be able to do some social anxiety treatments to help you manage any other mental health challenges that may be holding you back.
  • Catch up with a family member or friend and let them know how you’re feeling.
  • You could find a class or group that involves a hobby you enjoy, and take along someone you know for support.
  • Volunteer at a local charity or community project. Helping others is great for improving your mental health.
  • Join an online community. This is a good start when meeting new people as going out to meet new people in person can be daunting.

Below is a list of some services that are here to help tackle social isolation and some of its causes.

  • Mind - Cambridge MIND have a mentoring scheme through which volunteer mentors can assist existing service users towards achieving a particular goal/s. What exactly is involved is agreed together with the mentor, client and one of our project workers when they set up the mentoring agreement. The main point to take is that to access this mentoring scheme the individual would need to be accessing our services as a client initially. Mind also have support for loneliness which can be found here.

  • Spice - Spice is a charity that has developed a system of Time Credits as a way of recognising and celebrating the time people give and encouraging more new people to get involved in volunteering. A Time Credit is ‘earned’ for an hour of volunteering and can then be ‘spent’ on an hour of something that person enjoys, such as the theatre, swimming or learning new skills.  Spice has a wide network of places that accept Time Credits, from local opportunities in Cambridgeshire to national opportunities such as the Tower of London and the British Museum.

  • Wintercomfort - Wintercomfort supports people who are homeless or at risk of losing their homes in Cambridge. They offer a safe place where people can feel welcome and valued, basic amenities such as meals, showers and laundry facilities. The also offer a range of educational and recreational activities, opportunities to access other agencies (e.g. health service), legal advice and meaningful work and volunteering opportunities through our social enterprises.

  • Make Do And Mend - A creative and cooperative outlet for people with mental health needs to socialise and learn new skills through strengths-based workshops which are low-cost, sustainable, flexible and environmentally friendly. There is £10 joining cost.  A referral needs to be completed, but self-referrals are accepted. All activities are kept as low cost as possible.  A donation is asked for tea’s and coffees at activities attended.

Mental health challenges are common but help is available and with the right support many people recover completely. Check out our Support Services Page for lots of services who are local and national!

*Some information gathered from www.nhs.uk and the services listed.

BEREAVEMENT

What happens when you go through bereavement?

It is devastating when you lose someone close to you. Everyone’s experience of grief is unique, but there are some common things that lots of us will feel. You might feel numb, angry, exhausted or guilty for something you did or didn’t do or say. Your mind will be distracted so you may also find it hard to concentrate as well as you would do normally. These feelings are normal and will pass, but it can take time.

Speaking to someone can help, and you may get all the support you need from family and friends. If you don’t feel able to open up to people that you know, or you feel you are struggling, then there are organisations and sources of support that can help. These include:

  • Cruse Bereavement Care - Offers face-to- face, telephone (0808 808 1677) and email (helpline@cruse.org.uk) support.

  • Help is at Hand – A booklet specifically written for those bereaved by suicide by those who have also been affected by suicide. The booklet gives practical information as well as details of further support.

  • Samaritans – Provide a safe place for you to talk. They will listen and try to understand what you’re going through and help you make your own decisions that are right for you. You can get in contact with them via telephone (116 123 [free 24 hour helpline]), email, letter or face-to- face.

  • CPFT Bereavement Support Group - These are held on the second Monday evening of each month, but please ring to check the date if you were not at the previous meeting. The meetings take place from 6pm-7.30pm at: Quaker Meeting House 21 Thorpe Road Peterborough PE3 6AB. If you are attending the group for the first time, it’s really important you contact us first so we can get some details from you and have a chat about the format of the meetings. Please give us a ring (details in leaflet link).

Sometimes it isn’t just your own grief that you have to deal with, but that of your children. Children need time to grieve too, and it’s important to try and talk to them about their feelings as well as your own. Try to encourage them not to hide their feelings, but instead talk about them. As much as possible try to keep to the routine that your family had before the death to give a bit more stability, as hard as this may be.

These services provide specific support for young people and their families who are bereaved

  • Hope Again - Provides advice for young people after the death of someone close to them including personal stories of other young people who have been bereaved.

  •  Child Bereavement UK – supports families and educates professionals when a child or baby of any age dies or is dying, or when a child is facing bereavement.

  • Cruse Bereavement Care - Offers face-to- face, telephone (0808 808 1677) and email (helpline@cruse.org.uk) support.

  • Stars Children's Bereavement Support Service - Stars provides specialist bereavement support and counselling for any child or young person, aged 0-25 years who has experiences the death of someone close to them. We also provide support for young people when someone close to them is dying. Email: info@talktostars.org.uk, Telephone - 01223 863511.

  • Grief Encounter - A national service providing support to bereaved children and teenagers including e-counselling and materials to help to support bereaved children. Email: contact@griefencounter.org.uk, Telephone: 02083 718455.

  • Compassionate FriendsA charitable organisation of bereaved parents, siblings and grandparents dedicated to the support and care of other similarly bereaved family members who have suffered the death of a child or children of any age and from any cause. Email: helpline@tcf.org.uk, Telephone: 034512 32304.

  • Keep Your Head - Provides details of more services and information on children's mental health.

  • Kooth - Kooth is a free, confidential counselling service, provides mental health self-help information and support online for people aged between 11 and 19 years.

Other local healthcare services:

  • Sue Ryder Thorpe Hall Hospice - The hospice’s family support team offers individual and group support pre and post bereavement. Trained staff and volunteers also facilitate the monthly walking group Wayfinders. Support for bereaved children aged six to 11 is available through the Charlie Chimp Club.

  • Arthur Rank House Hospice, Cambridge - Offers bereavement support to the families of patients who have received care from one of their services. Keith Morrison (Chaplain), Email: keith.morrison@arhc.org.uk, Tel: 01223 675777

  • Sue Ryder St John's Hospice - Offers bereavement support to families and friends of patients cared for at the hospice. Jane Maxfield, Family Support & Bereavement Co-ordinator.

  • The Alan Hudson Day Treatment Centre - The Alan Hudson Day Treatment Centre based at North Cambs Hospital in Wisbech, is a day centre supporting people who are living with a life-limiting illness. They also run a support day three times a year for bereaved relatives.

Voluntary organisations

  • Age UK - Provides advice and information for older people through an advice line‚ publications and website.

  • The Samaritans - Provide confidential emotional support at all times of day and night.

  • Cogwheel Trust for Counselling - The Cogwheel Trust is a charity, motivated by its Christian ethos, working throughout Cambridgeshire to improve the emotional and psychological well-being of local people. 

For more information on bereavement and dealing with grief please visit the NHS Choices bereavement webpage. Click here for a printable bereavement leaflet full of services for the Cambridgeshire and Peterborough area.

Mental health challenges are common but help is available and with the right support many people recover completely. Check out our Who Can Help Page for lots of services who are local and national!

*Some information gathered from www.nhs.uk and the services listed.

PERSONALITY DISORDERS

What is a personality disorder?

A person with a personality disorder thinks, feels, behaves or relates to others very differently from person to person. Someone with a personality disorder may also have other mental health challenges, such as depression or drug/alcohol addictions. It is important to realise that although you may have a personality disorder, your personality disorder is not all that you are, you are still a member of society like everyone else, you just have a mental health challenge and our mental health challenges do no define who we are as people.

There are several different types of personality disorder; and not any two people will have the same symptoms, emotions and challenges.

In mental health, the word ‘personality’ refers to the collection of characteristics or traits that we have developed as we have grown up and which make each of us an individual. These include the ways that we:

  • Think
  • Feel
  • Behave

By our late teens, or early 20s, most of us have developed our own personality. We have our own ways of thinking, feeling and behaving. These stay pretty much the same for the rest of our life. Usually, our personality allows us to get on reasonably well with other people.

For some of us, this doesn't happen. For whatever reason, parts of your personality can develop in ways that make it difficult for you to live with yourself and/or with other people. You may not be able to learn from the things that happen to you. You find that you can't change the bits of your personality (traits) that cause the issues. These traits, although they are part of who you are, just go on making life difficult for you - and often for other people as well. 

Other people may have noticed these traits from your childhood and early teens. For example, you may find it difficult to:

  • Make or keep close relationships
  • Get on with people at work
  • Get on with friends and family
  • Keep out of trouble
  • Control your feelings or behaviour
  • Listen to other people

If this makes you unhappy or distressed and/or often upset or harm other people, then you may have a personality disorder.

What are the symptoms?

Symptoms vary depending on the type of personality disorder. You may also find that you have some symptoms of a personality disorder depending on what is happening within your life, for example if you've experienced a trauma or loss; and some of these symptoms are natural reactions to what has happened to you and will usually subside with some time. However, if you usually have these symptoms day to day and you are struggling to find a reason then you may want to consider that you could have a personality disorder.

Research suggests that personality disorders tend to fall into three groups according to the different emotional traits, these are as follows:

Cluster A - 'Odd or Eccentric' :

  • Paranoid - suspicious, feel that other people are being nasty to you (when evidence shows this isn't true), feeling easily rejected and tends to hold grudges.
  • Schizoid - emotionally cold, don't like contact with other people, prefer your own company and have a rich fantasy world.
  • Schizotypal - eccentric behavior, odd ideas, difficulties with thinking, lack of emotion or inappropriate emotional reactions, see or hear strange things and sometimes related to schizophrenia the mental health challenge.

Cluster B - 'Dramatic, Emotional or Erratic' :

  • Antisocial, dissocial – don’t care much about the feelings of others, easily get frustrated, tend to be aggressive, commit crimes, find it difficult to make close relationships, impulsive (do things on the spur of the moment without thinking about them), don’t feel guilty about htings you’ve done and don’t learn from unpleasant experiences.
  • Borderline, or Emotionally Unstable – impulsive, find it hard to control your emotions, feel bad about yourself, often self-harm, feel empty, make relationships quickly – but easily lose them, can feel paranoid or depressed and when stressed, may hear voices.
  • Histrionic – over-dramatrise events, self-centred, have strong emotions which change quickly and don’t last long, can be suggestible, worry a lot about your appearance, crave new things and excitement and can be seductive.
  • Narcissistic –have a strong sense of your own self-importance, dream of unlimited success, power and intellectual brilliance, crave attention from other people, but show few warm feelings in return, take advantage of other people and ask for favours that you do not then return.

Cluster C - 'Anxious and Fearful' :

  • Obsessive-Compulsive (aka Anankastic) – worry and doubt a lot, perfectionist (always check things), rigid in what you do, stick to routines, cautious, preoccupied with detail, worry about doing the wrong thing, find it hard to adapt to new situations, often have high moral standards, judgemental, sensitive to criticism and can have obsessional thoughts and images (although these are not as bad as those in obsessive-compulsive disorder).
  • Avoidant (aka Anxious/Avoidant) – very anxious and tense, worry a lot, feel insecure and inferior, have to be liked and accepted and extremely sensitive to criticism.
  • Dependent – passive, rely on others to make decisions for you, do what other people want you to do, find it hard to cope with daily chores, feel hopeless and incompetent and easily feel abandoned by others.

The symptoms and difficulties you can experience may not fit exactly into any one of these categories. You may see aspects of yourself in more than one category.

Bipolar disorder

What is Bipolar?

Bipolar disorder, formerly known as manic depression, is a condition that affects your moods, which can swing from one extreme to another.

People with bipolar disorder have periods or episodes of:

·         Depression – feeling very low and lethargic

You may initially be diagnosed with clinical depression before having a future manic episode (sometimes years later), after which you may be diagnosed with bipolar disorder. During an episode of depression, you may have overwhelming feelings of worthlessness, which can potentially lead to thoughts of suicide. If you're feeling suicidal or having severe depressive symptoms, contact your GP, care co-ordinator or local mental health emergency services as soon as possible.

·         Mania – feeling very high and overactive (less severe mania is known as hypomania)

During a manic phase of bipolar disorder, you may feel very happy and have lots of energy, ambitious plans and ideas. You may spend large amounts of money on things you can't afford and wouldn't normally want. Not feeling like eating or sleeping, talking quickly and becoming annoyed easily are also common characteristics of this phase. You may feel very creative and view the manic phase of bipolar as a positive experience. However, you may also experience symptoms of psychosis, where you see or hear things that aren't there or become convinced of things that aren't true.

Symptoms of bipolar disorder depend on which mood you're experiencing. Unlike simple mood swings, each extreme episode of bipolar disorder can last for several weeks (or even longer), and some people may not experience a "normal" mood very often.

The high and low phases of bipolar disorder are often so extreme that they interfere with everyday life.

However, there are several options for treating bipolar disorder that can make a difference. They aim to control the effects of an episode and help someone with bipolar disorder live life as normally as possible.

The following treatment options are available:

medication to prevent episodes of mania, hypomania (less severe mania) and depression – these are known as mood stabilisers and are taken every day on a long-term basis
medication to treat the main symptoms of depression and mania when they occur
learning to recognise the triggers and signs of an episode of depression or mania
psychological treatment – such as talking therapy, which can help you deal with depression, and provides advice about how to improve your relationships
lifestyle advice – such as doing regular exercise, planning activities you enjoy that give you a sense of achievement, as well as advice on improving your diet and getting more sleep
It's thought using a combination of different treatment methods is the best way to control bipolar disorder.

Who’s affected?

Bipolar disorder is fairly common and one in every 100 adults will be diagnosed with the condition at some point in their life.

Bipolar disorder can occur at any age, although it often develops between the ages of 15 and 19 and rarely develops after 40. Men and women from all backgrounds are equally likely to develop bipolar disorder.

Who can help?

If you or someone you know may be suffering with a personality disorder then there are services available for you to get help. Your GP is a good place to start and they may be able to refer you to services to get help.

Services available to help you:

  • Springbank Cambridgeshire and Peterborough NHS - Springbank is a 12-bed inpatient recovery unit for women with a diagnosis of borderline personality disorder (BPD) who are struggling to cope with the demands of life outside of hospital, despite the input from community psychiatric services. Funded by CPFT.

  • Rethink - Offer loads of helpful links to services and information/advice.

  • Time to Change - Offers helpful advice on where you can get help and you can see other peoples stories.

  • ELEFriends - Elefriends is a friendly, supportive online community for anyone experiencing a mental health challenge.

  • MIND – Mind is a mental health charity that offers lots of helpful advice and services.

 

Mental health challenges are common but help is available and with the right support many people recover completely. Check out our Support Services Page for lots of services who are local and national!

*Some information gathered from www.nhs.uk and the services listed.

SCHIZOPHRENIA

What is Schizophrenia?

Schizophrenia is a severe long-term mental health challenge. It causes a range of different psychological symptoms.

Doctors often describe schizophrenia as a type of psychosis. This means the person may not always be able to distinguish their own thoughts and ideas from reality.

Symptoms of schizophrenia include: 

  • Hallucinations – hearing or seeing things that don't exist
  • Delusions – unusual beliefs not based on reality 
  • Muddled thoughts based on hallucinations or delusions
  • Changes in behaviour

Some people think schizophrenia causes a "split personality" or violent behaviour. This is not true. The cause of any violent behaviour is usually drug or alcohol misuse. When someone with schizophrenia is hearing voices they are not always violent or angry, they can be playful, friendly and funny.

What treatments are there?

Schizophrenia is usually treated with a combination of medication and therapy tailored to each individual. In most cases, this will be antipsychotic medicines and cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT).

People with schizophrenia usually receive help from a community mental health team, which offers day-to-day support and treatment.

Many people recover from schizophrenia, although they may have periods when symptoms return (relapses). Support and treatment can help reduce the impact the condition has on daily life.

If schizophrenia is well managed, it's possible to reduce the chance of severe relapses.

This can include:

·         Recognising the signs of an acute episode

·         Taking medication as prescribed

·         Talking to others about the condition

There are many charities and support groups offering help and advice on living with schizophrenia. Most people find it comforting talking to others with a similar condition.

Who can help?

If you or someone you know is experiencing symptoms of schizophrenia, see your GP as soon as possible. The earlier schizophrenia is treated, the better. There's no single test for schizophrenia. It's usually diagnosed after an assessment by a mental health care professional, such as a psychiatrist. You can also refer yourself to services that offer help and support for people with Schizophrenia and other Mental Health Challenges.

 

Mental health challenges are common but help is available and with the right support many people recover completely. Check out our Support Services Page for lots of services who are local and national!

*Some information gathered from www.nhs.uk and the services listed.

DEMENTIA

What is Dementia?

Dementia is a term used to describe a range of disorders or conditions that are affecting the brain. There are several types of dementia, the most common and well known one is Alzheimer's disease. You can have Dementia at any age, not just as you get older, and everyone diagnosed with dementia will experience their own unique symptoms.

What are the most common types of Dementia?

The most common types of Dementia are as follows:

Alzheimer's Disease - symptoms are usually mild to begin with and then worsen over time. (Difficulty with language, depressed or agitated and may withdraw from family and friends, memory lapses, problems with special awareness, difficulty making decisions, problem solving and/or disorientation of time or place, a person not recognizing a familiar face.)

Vascular Dementia - caused by small blood clots preventing oxygen getting to the brain. (Progression can be quite erratic as a person my not have a series of blood clots for sometime. People suffering will usually appear to be 'getting better', this is usually temporary, as the damage to the brain can eventually lead to difficulties; e.g. with daily living, attention, memory, decision making and motivation.) 

Frontotemporal - More common under the age of 65. Frontotemporal Dementia represents a group of conditions which are caused due to nerve cells in the brain dying and the nerve pathways becoming damaged in the frontal and temporal lobes of the brain. (Behavioural Variant Frontotemporal Dementia symptoms can be: changes in behavior or personality, apathy, obsessive or repetitive behaviours, loss of empathy, changes in appetite, difficulties making decisions, problem solving and concentration.)(Primary Progressive Aphasia, which consists of Semantic Dementia and Progressive Non Fluent Aphasia can have the following symptoms: language difficulties, speech or grammar problems, reduced understanding and difficulty recognizing familiar faces or objects.)

Dementia with Lewy bodies - Dementia with Lewy Bodies is caused by a build up of clumps and proteins in nerve cells in the brain, known as Lewy Bodies. (Symptoms of this are: fluctuating alertness, confusion and concentration levels, memory issues, mood changes, struggling with problem solving, spatial awareness, difficulty doing everyday tasks, tremors, slower movement, sleep disturbance, unsteadiness, an increase in falls and visual hallucinations.

 

Although there is no known cure for Dementia just yet, there is still support out there for you, anyone looking after someone with Dementia and anyone looking for more information. Here are some services here to help with Dementia:

Local Services:

  • Huntingdonshire Dementia Action Alliance  - Dementia Action Alliance brings together leading organisations across England committed to transforming health and social care outcomes for people affected by dementia. Dementia Action Alliance captures and promotes best practice, enabling it to benefit many more people. They do this through member Action Plans. These are made public on their website. Members come together to share best practice and learn about the latest trends and innovations from across health and social care. We enable this through our events programme that includes roundtables, conferences and webinars. Members come together to influence system-wide change and campaign on major issues within health and social care affecting people living with dementia. 

  • Dementia Carers Support Service The Dementia Carers’ Support Service (DCSS) provides support for carers of people with dementia throughout the journey of their caring role. This is achieved by linking current carers of people with dementia with those who already have first-hand carer experience. These experienced carers are a befriender or buddy and become Dementia Carers’ Support Volunteer.

  • Dementia Support Service Cambridgeshire - The Alzheimer's Society dementia support workers offer information and practical guidance to help you understand dementia, cope with day-to-day challenges and prepare for the future. They offer information to people who are worried about their memory and ongoing support to people affected by dementia face to face, over the phone or in writing. 

  • Peterborough Dementia Action Alliance - Dementia Action Alliance brings together leading organisations across England committed to transforming health and social care outcomes for people affected by dementia. Dementia Action Alliance captures and promotes best practice, enabling it to benefit many more people. They do this through member Action Plans. These are made public on their website. Members come together to share best practice and learn about the latest trends and innovations from across health and social care. We enable this through our events programme that includes roundtables, conferences and webinars. Members come together to influence system-wide change and campaign on major issues within health and social care affecting people living with dementia. 

  • Love to Move - Love to Move is a seated exercise and movement programme, packed with fun, music and laughter and specially designed to help improve the fitness of mind and body. This exercise programme is unique in the UK and proven to have significant physical, emotional and cognitive benefits for all participants, particularly those living with dementia. Each session lasts one hour and is delivered by an experienced and enthusiastic tutor.

  • Dementia Compass - Founded in 2010, Dementia Compass works to support individuals with a cognitive impairment and their families and care partners. We are a volunteer-led, not-for-profit organization based in Cambridgeshire, England.

  • Dementia Compass - D'Music'a Community Choir - We welcome anyone who loves music, especially those with memory challenges. We are a group consisting of individuals diagnosed with a dementia or mild cognitive impairment, their care partners and people who are keen on singing, having fun, and supporting opportunities for people living with dementia.

Local Dementia Cafés:

A Dementia Café is a café that people suffering with dementia can visit and be social, along with their friends, families and carers. The cafés are relaxed are give people the opportunity to talk with staff and other people about dementia whilst having a cup of tea and cake. Some cafés host regular talks by a range of local services who promote wellbeing and safety.

National Services:

  • Dementia UK - This site offers support and helpful information about dementia and how you can get in touch for more help and info.

  • Alzheimer's Research UK - Alzheimer’s Research UK is the UK’s leading dementia research charity, dedicated to causes, diagnosis, prevention, treatment and cure. Backed by our passionate scientists and supporters, we’re challenging the way people think about dementia, uniting the big thinkers in the field and funding the innovative science that will deliver a cure.

  • Alzheimer's Society - This site has great information about getting help and getting involved in supporting people with Alzheimer's.

  • Age UK - Age UK's vision is to make the UK a great place to grow older. They do this by inspiring, supporting and enabling in a number of ways.

  • Carers Trust Cambridgeshire, Peterborough and Norfolk - We support family carers of all ages across Cambridgeshire, Peterborough and Norfolk. We also offer flexible, professional care services to adults and children with a range of disabilities and health conditions.

Mental health challenges are common but help is available and with the right support many people recover completely. Check out our Support Services Page for lots of services who are local and national!

 

*Some information gathered from www.nhs.uk and the services listed.

STRESS

If you are feeling stressed, you're not alone. Stress is the feeling of being under too much mental or emotional pressure, and pressure turns into stress when you feel unable to cope. A bit of stress is normal and can help push you to do something new or difficult, but too much stress can take its toll.

There are things you can do, and people or services that can help you to get on top of what is causing you to worry. Check out One You information on stress and try some of these top tips:

Talk to Someone - Sharing how you feel can really help. Start by telling a friend, family member or someone else you can trust just how you feel. If you've tried self-help techniques and they aren't working, you could speak to a health professional who will be able to give you more guidance and suggest other sources of support.

Take Control of Money Worries - A common root of many people’s worries is money problems. There are lots of organisations that can help you manage your situation, so don’t feel alone. Visit the NHS Choices website for information on charities that can help.

Stopping Smoking - Stopping smoking is not only beneficial to your physical health, but can also improve your mental health and relieve stress. It’s a myth that smoking helps people to relax, it actually can increase anxiety and stress. There is lots of help available to support you. As a first step call the local Stop Smoking service on:

Cambridgeshire - 0800 018 4304

Peterborough - 0800 376 56 55

Get Active! Being physically active can boost your mood, sleep quality and energy, as well as reduce your risk of stress. Often the easiest way to build activity into your day is through walking or cycling instead of taking the car. Visit the One You website for more information on ways to get active or visit:

Be Well Cambridgeshire

Healthy Peterborough

Mental health challenges are common but help is available and with the right support many people recover completely. Check out our Support Services Page for lots of services who are local and national!

 

*Some information gathered from www.nhs.uk and the services listed.

SLEEP

Sleep allows your mind to unwind and de-stress. It also helps your brain to make sense of the day, and enables your body to fight illnesses better. Sleep and mood effect each other, so try and boost how much good quality sleep you are getting each night.

A few tips to help you sleep well:

  • Try making a list of the things you need to do tomorrow before you go to bed so that they aren’t on your mind when you are trying to sleep.
  • If you can’t sleep, then don’t lie in bed worrying about it, get up and do something relaxing until you feel sleepy before returning to bed.
  • Moderate exercise (that raises your heart rate and makes you breathe faster and feel warmer) on a regular basis can help to relieve tension and aid sleep.
  • Cut down on caffeine, particularly in the evenings, as it can interfere with falling asleep and prevent deep sleep. Try switching to a warm milky drink or herbal tea instead.
  • Try to have a regular routine for your sleep – going to bed and getting up at roughly the same time each day can really help.
  • Avoid using phones, tablets or watching TV for around an hour before bed.
  • Think about the room you are sleeping in – is it a good temperature? Is it dark enough?

For more tips and advice on sleep visit the One You and NHS Choices websites:

One You logoNHS choices logo

Mental health challenges are common but help is available and with the right support many people recover completely. Check out our Support Services Page for lots of services who are local and national!

*Some information gathered from www.nhs.uk and the services listed.

LEARNING DISABILITIES

What is a learning disability?

A learning disability is something that affects a way in which a person learns new things throughout their life. A learning disability can affect a person’s ability to:

  • Understand new or complex information
  • Learning new skills
  • Coping independently

Learning disabilities can vary in severity. They can be mild, moderate or severe.

Some people who have a learning disability will find talking easy, and can live independently but may need slightly longer to learn new skills; whereas other people may struggle with communicating and could have other disabilities as well. A persons’ ability to live independently can depend on the level of care and support they need and receive.

Young people and children with learning disabilities may also have special educational needs (SEN).

Most learning disabilities are diagnosed in childhood, but they can be diagnosed at any time in a person’s life. Down’s syndrome for example, is diagnosed at birth, whereas some others may only be discovered when a child is old enough to talk and walk.

After a diagnosis of a learning disability, your GP can refer you for any specialist support you may need. You can then get to know the team of professionals that will be involved in the care of your child.

People with a learning disability can live as full and independent a life as possible with the right support from some of the following professionals:

  • GPs
  • Paediatricians
  • Speech and Language Therapists
  • Physiotherapists
  • Educational and Clinical Psychologists
  • Social Care Workers

What causes learning disabilities?

A learning disability happens when a person’s brain development is affected, either before they’re born, during their birth or in their early childhood.

Affects in brain development can be caused by things such as:

  • The mother becoming ill during pregnancy
  • Problems during the birth that prevents enough oxygen getting to the brain
  • The unborn baby inheriting certain genes from its parents that make having a learning disability more likely – known as inherited learning disability
  • Illness, for example, meningitis or injury in early childhood

Sometimes there isn’t a clear or known cause for a learning disability.

Certain conditions are often associated with having a learning disability because people with these conditions are more likely to have one. For example, everyone with Down’s syndrome has some kind of learning disability, and so do many people with cerebral palsy. People with autism may also have a learning disabilities, and around 30% or people with epilepsy have a learning disability.

What is a profound and multiple learning disability (PMLD)?

A profound and multiple learning disability is when a person has severe learning disability and other disabilities that significantly affect their ability to be independent and communicate.

A person with PMLD can have severe difficulty seeing, hearing, speaking and moving. They might have complex health and social care needs or other conditions.

People with profound and multiple learning disability often need a carer/carers to help them with most areas of everyday life, for example, eating, washing and going to the toilet. With support, lots of people can learn to communicate in different ways, be involved in decisions about themselves, do things they enjoy and achieve more independence.

Living with a diagnosis of a learning disability:

It can be quite a shock to be diagnosed with a learning disability; it isn’t always clear what caused it or what the learning disability is.

Some children can be late when reaching milestones in development, such us walking or talking, this is usually nothing to worry about. Some developmental challenges can have a definite cause, like a hearing or sight problems, learning disabilities or autism.

If you’re worried about your child’s development, speak to your GP.

To ensure a person with disabilities or long-term health conditions get the right care for their needs, they will be assessed. This can be finding the right health treatment and support, education and training. If someone needs more than one kind of assessment, they should be combined together.

*Some information gathered from www.nhs.uk and www.cpft.nhs.uk .

AUTISM

What is Autism?

Autism is a spectrum disorder, which can be diagnosed as autism spectrum disorder or Asperger syndrome. Autism is a lifelong condition that can affect people in how they communicate and interact with others.

Autism can affect people in different ways, however most autistic people see, hear and experience the world differently to how people without autism experience the world.

1 in every 100 people are estimated to be autistic in the UK. Men and boys are diagnosed as autistic more often than women and girls; however, it is thought now that older women and girls may manage autism differently and therefore go through life without a diagnosis.

There is no “cure” for autism, with the right support many autistic people live fulfilled with active lives.

What are the signs and characteristics of autism?

Every person is different, so the characteristics and signs vary widely. There are however, two common characteristics:

  • Repetitive behaviour, activities and routines – such as fixed daily routine and repetitive body movements.
  • Difficulties with social communications and interactions – autistic people can find it hard to make friends or join in conversations.

People with autism can also be under or oversensitive to certain noises, colours, lights and other things, known as sensory sensitivity. These characteristics are present over time and have noticeable effect on daily life.

Certain health challenges and conditions are more common in autistic people. These include:

  • Depression
  • Anxiety
  • Obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD)
  • Epilepsy
  • Learning disabilities
  • Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD)
  • Dyspraxia

It’s important that these conditions should be identified and treated properly, and are not thought of as a part of the autism spectrum.

Getting a diagnosis

The main signs of autism, for example, difficulties with social interactions and communications, can often be recognised in early childhood. Some signs of autism may not be noticeable until a situation change, such as when the child starts nursery, changes school or leaves school.

Many adults have not had a formal diagnosis, but there are benefits to getting a diagnosis, including:

  • Protection under the Equality Act
  • Understanding your differences
  • Access to support services

See a GP or health visitor if you notice any signs of autism in your child or yourself, or if you’re worried about your child’s development. It can also help you get educational, health and care support without a diagnosis of autism, getting one makes sure your child gets the right support when they need it.

 

*Some information gathered from www.nhs.uk and the services listed.

LONG-TERM CONDITIONS

Managing your Well-Being with a Long-Term Condition:

Living with a long term health condition can take its toll on your mental well-being. Long-term conditions can lead to frustration, anxiety, low mood and other mental health challenges. If you live with a long-term health condition it does not mean you will suffer with mental health challenges, everybody had mental health and we all cope with stress and things like health conditions in our own ways. 

 

Managing your well-being with diabetes:

Having the long-term condition of diabetes means that you have to juggle managing your condition along with everyday life. This can be very overwhelming, stressful and can cause frustration. Changes in mood are very common because of this. Research suggests that if you have diabetes, you are more likely to experience challenges with anxiety and depression.

National clinical health guidelines have demonstrated that cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) is useful for people who are struggling with managing their diabetes. CBT can enhance peoples’ understanding of diabetes care and has also been shown to improve mood and glycaemic control.

Finding Support

CPFT Psychological Well-being Service works alongside and collaborates with GPs, hospitals, diabetes specialist nurses and consultants.  We will help you recognise if you are experiencing anxiety or depression and how this might affect health and management of your diabetes.  Therapists have training and experience in working with people with diabetes and other physical health conditions. Together, we will be able to talk about the range of therapy options that would be most helpful and suitable for you.

 

Managing your well-being with a heart condition:

People living with heart conditions typically experience higher rates of mental health challenges. Some research suggests that you can be three times more likely to suffer with anxiety and/or depression if you are living with a heart condition. Anxiety is the most common symptom (77%) and over half (51%) of people with a heart condition experience symptoms of depression. Despite these strong feelings, many people do not speak to anyone about the emotional or psychological impacts of having a heart condition.  

It can be really helpful to talk with someone about your heart condition. Improved management of stress and depression can help support future changes to your physical and emotional health. This in turn will help to improve your cardiovascular risk profile and lower your risk of further cardiac events.

Finding Support

CPFT Psychological Well-being Service works alongside and collaborates with GPs, hospitals, cardiac specialist nurses and consultants.  We will help you recognise if you are experiencing anxiety or depression and how this might affect health and management of your heart condition.  Therapists have training and experience in working with people with cardiac conditions and other physical health problems. Together, we will be able to talk about the range of therapy options that would be most helpful and suitable for you.

 

Managing your wellbeing with Respiratory Disorders:

People living with COPD (Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease) or other chronic respiratory diseases can find themselves feeling low and/or anxious. Research shows that people with COPD are 2.5 times more likely to experience depression and anxiety than the general population. Symptoms such as breathlessness, coughing and fatigue can contribute to feelings of stress, anxiety or depression. These feelings can lead to reduced activity levels, which may worsen your condition.  Cognitive behavioural therapy techniques have proven to be successful in psycho-educational breathlessness/health promotion groups as well as individually  in primary and secondary care, with positive outcomes on: psychological wellbeing, coping strategies and use of health services.

Finding Support

CPFT Psychological Wellbeing Service works alongside and collaborates with GPs, hospitals, respiratory specialist nurses and consultants.  We will help you recognise if you are experiencing anxiety or depression and how this might affect health and management of your respiratory condition.  Therapists have training and experience in working with people with lung conditions and other physical health problems. Together, we will be able to talk about the range of therapy options that would be most helpful and suitable for you.

 

Who is CPFT's Psychological Wellbeing Service for? Is if free? And how can I refer myself?

The service is for people aged over 17 years who are normally resident in Cambridgeshire and Peterborough who are registered with a GP in one of these areas.  We do not have an upper age limit.

The service is free of charge as it is an NHS service.

You can refer yourself Here! You can also call their self-referral team on 0300 300 0055 and they will guide you through the process, let them know that you have a Long-term Condition. The telephone line is open from 9am to 5pm Mon-Fri.

The Psychological Wellbeing Service provides psychological therapy that recognises the difficulties for some patients with long-term physical health conditions including COPD, Diabetes and Cardiac disease including heart failure.

CPFT's Psychological Wellbeing Service aims to help you to improve your well-being, support you to manage your health problem and help you to look at how you can live your life in a more positive way.

We offer a range of treatment options including courses as well as individual therapy, which case take place via the telephone, online or face to face depending on the treatment you receive. The type of therapy we predominantly use is Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (see therapies section).

We are based in a variety of locations across the county to make access easier, including at our base sites in Huntingdon, Cambridge, Wisbech, March and Peterborough.  We also work out of many GP surgeries, various rooms in the community such as libraries and some hospital settings.  However, we do not see people in their own home.

For information on managing your long term condition, check out the CPFT website here!

*Some information gathered from www.nhs.uk and www.cpft.nhs.uk .

PHYSICAL ACTIVITY AND MENTAL HEALTH

How can being active help your mental health?

Evidence shows that being active is good for your physical health and fitness and can have a positive impact on your mental well being too. Being active does not mean that you need to be spending several hours a day in the gym, if that isn't something you enjoy. You can stay healthy by finding an activity which is, in broad terms, active that you enjoy, and do that instead.

Scientists believe that being active helps maintain and improve mental and physical well-being. It has been said that physical activity can help people who are living with anxiety and depression. Being active is thought to cause chemical changes in the brain, which can help our mood in a positive way. It is also believed that being active helps build self-esteem, confidence and resilience.

How can you get more active?

It is generally recommended that an adult over the age of 19 years old should do at least 150 minutes (2 1/2 hours) per week of moderate to intensive activity. Find an activity you enjoy doing that involves being active, because this will help you make being active a normal part of your life.

Some places have programs that are free for people who have been diagnosed with mental health challenges, for example; Invigorate offer a range of different activity groups to anyone who has mental health challenges and their support system, you can find out more here.

  • Mental Health MatesBryony Gordon established MHM in February 2016 as a safe space for you to walk and talk about mental health problems without fear of judgement. There are walks around the nation and you can find out some more information about the walks here and on their website here.

WORKING IN THE EMERGENCY SERVICES

If you’re someone that works within the emergency services, it’s likely you’ve been face to face with difficult and potentially traumatic situations. It’s important to keep your mental wellbeing healthy, as you live with this day-in day-out, and it’s what gets you through the stressful situations you see every day in your job.

Working in an environment where you are helping other peoples traumatic and stressful situations every day doesn’t mean you aren’t allowed to have mental health challenges of your own. Mental health challenges are completely normal and are different for everyone. Your mental wellbeing is just as important as physical wellbeing, and you need to maintain both in order to stay fit and healthy.

Your mental wellbeing can be affected by work-related factors like:

  • Repeated exposure to traumatic events
  • Workload pressures
  • Long working hours
  • Lone working
  • Dealing with people who may be physically or verbally abusive

There are lots of ways you can get some help if you feel that you’re struggling with your mental wellbeing. You can talk to your GP, refer yourself to mental health services or you can talk to friends and family about it.

Here’s a list of services available to help:

Policing Services:

  • The Police Treatment Centres provide timely and effective treatment and support for our police family patients, in order to improve their health, fitness and wellbeing.
  • Blue Lamp Foundation  Blue Lamp Foundation helps support our injured emergency services heroes.
  • Flint House The flint house provides planned rehabilitation services for both mental and physical health to warranted serving police officers, retired police officers, special constables, PC SO’s and designated detention officers.
  • Safe Horizon SHUK is a charity that provides support and assistance when dealing with mental health stigma and Disability Discrimination in the workplace.  We understand the impact of psychological injury on you, your work and your relationships.
  • Disabled Police Association Our Association seeks to ensure the fair treatment of everyone in the police service, but works particularly hard to ensure that it is the ability of disabled officers and staff that is recognised, rather than the employee’s limitations.
  • MIND Blue Light Infoline The Blue Light Infoline offers confidential, independent and practical support, advice and signposting around mental health and wellbeing. The Infoline is just for emergency service staff, volunteers and their families, to help keep you or those you care about well for work.

Ambulance Services:

  • The Ambulance Staff Charity (TASC) We provide confidential, impartial and independent advice and access to a range of support services, including rehabilitation when recovering from illness or injury, mental health support; bereavement support; debt and welfare advice; financial grants and other support.
  • Blue Lamp Foundation  Blue Lamp Foundation helps support our injured emergency services heroes.
  • MIND Blue Light Infoline The Blue Light Infoline offers confidential, independent and practical support, advice and signposting around mental health and wellbeing. The Infoline is just for emergency service staff, volunteers and their families, to help keep you or those you care about well for work.

Fire and Rescue:

  • The Fire Fighters Charity Provides support with rehabilitation, health and wellbeing, nursing, recuperation, children/family, advice, support and much more.
  • The Big White Wall Big White Wall is an online mental health and wellbeing service offering self-help programmes, creative outlets and a community that cares. When you're dealing with everyday stressors or major life events, they'll help you get through it.
  • Women In The Fire Service Formally known as Networking Women in the Fire Service, WFS was formed in 1993.  It is a voluntary, not for profit organisation with members from across all roles within the FRS community which offers support and advice.
  • Blue Lamp Foundation  Blue Lamp Foundation helps support our injured emergency services heroes.
  • MIND Blue Light Infoline The Blue Light Infoline offers confidential, independent and practical support, advice and signposting around mental health and wellbeing. The Infoline is just for emergency service staff, volunteers and their families, to help keep you or those you care about well for work.

Search and Rescue:

  • Blue Lamp Foundation  Blue Lamp Foundation helps support our injured emergency services heroes.
  • MIND Blue Light Infoline The Blue Light Infoline offers confidential, independent and practical support, advice and signposting around mental health and wellbeing. The Infoline is just for emergency service staff, volunteers and their families, to help keep you or those you care about well for work.

 

*Some information gathered from www.nhs.uk and the services listed.

Crisis

WHO CAN HELP

You, or someone you know, might be in crisis if:

·         You are thinking of hurting yourself or suicide seems the only option.

·         Someone you know has made threats to hurt you or someone else.

·         You are experiencing extreme distress that seems overwhelming.

Who can help in a mental health crisis?

Call 111 and select option 2 when prompted for Mental Health service for the First Response Service -

A 24-hour service for people in a mental health crisis. This service is for anyone, of any age, living in Cambridgeshire and Peterborough. The phone will be answered by a trained mental health professional who will be able to listen to your concerns and help you get the support you need.  They can offer advice over the phone, put you in contact with the crisis services or even refer you to a Sanctuary - safe places run by Cambridgeshire, Peterborough and South Lincolnshire Mind (CPSL Mind). 

 

 

The Peterborough and Cambridge Sanctuaries offer short-term practical and emotional support between 6pm and 1am, seven days a week. You can watch a tour of the Cambridge Sanctuary.

Who can call?

If you aren't able to make the call yourself then anyone can call on your behalf, for example a friend, carer, loved one or even your GP. The service is available to anyone, of any age, currently living in Cambridgeshire and Peterborough in a mental health crisis.

For more information visit: http://www.cpft.nhs.uk/about-us/mental-health-crisis.htm

There are lots of people who can help if you're suffering with a Mental Health Challenge! 

There are several local services here to help - you can find them on our Local Services Page!

There is also a wide range of national services available to you - find these on our National Services Page!

You can check out loads of local services available in Cambridgeshire in the Lifecraft Mental Health Handbook. The Handbook is a directory of local and national mental health services, and is regularly updated. It also includes some useful services that are not specific to mental health. There are also chapters that explain relevant law and theory, plus information about statutory mental health services and professionals. You can download a free pdf version of it here!

Self help books are also out there for you if you would prefer to go down the self help road. There is the option of getting books on prescription -Reading Well Books on Prescription helps you to understand and manage your health and wellbeing using self-help reading. The scheme is endorsed by health professionals and supported by public libraries. You can also try mood boosting books - Reading Well Mood-boosting Books is a national promotion of uplifting titles, including novels, poetry and non-fiction. The books are all recommended by readers and reading groups.

 

                                                      NHS 111 Mental Health Crisis Picture

*Some information gathered from www.nhs.uk and the services listed.

SUICIDE

Not everyone who thinks about suicide will tell someone and there are some people who give no indication at all of their intention. However, there are warning signs that we can all look out for. These include if a person is:

·         Talking or writing about death, dying or suicide.

·         Actively looking for ways to kill themselves.

·         Talking about feeling hopeless or having no reason to live.

·         Talking about being a burden to others.

·         Talking about feeling trapped or in unbearable pain.

·         Increasing their use of alcohol or drugs.

·         Suddenly very much ‘recovered’ after a period of depression.

·         Visiting or calling people unexpectedly to say goodbye either directly or indirectly.

·         Making arrangements; setting their affairs in order.

·         Giving things away, such as prized possessions.

The STOP Suicide website has lots of information on what to do if you are worried about someone or you need help yourself.

You can also visit the Zero Suicide Alliance website and complete a 20 minute suicide prevention course which can give you some extremely helpful information on how you can talk to someone who may be feeling suicidal along with some helpful resources.

There is also lots of support for people who are struggling with bereavement through suicide. Below are lots of services, helplines, groups and books that offer lots of help and advice:

HELPLINES

ORGANIZATION

SERVICE

 

TIME

TELEPHONE

CPFT

1st Response

Supports people experiencing a mental health crisis. Mental health care, advice, support and treatment.

24-hour access,

7 days a week

365 days a year

Call 111

Select:Option 2

Lifeline

Free, confidential and anonymous telephone; provides listening support and information to someone experiencing mental distress or for people who are supporting someone in distress.

7.00pm – 11.00pm

365 days of the year

FREEPHONE

0808 808 2121

Samaritans

Offer a safe place for you to talk any time you like, in your own way – about whatever’s getting to you. You don’t have to be suicidal.

10:30am - 10:00pm

 

FREEPHONE

116 123

 

Winston’s Wish

For children. Giving hope to grieving children. With the right support at the right time, a child can face the future with confidence and hope.

Mon – Fri 9am -5pm

Except bank holidays

FREEPHONE

08088 020 021

Childline

Helpline

For children and young people in the UK.

You can talk to us about anything. No problem is too big or too small.  However you choose to contact us, you're in control. It’s confidential and you don’t have to give your name if you don’t want to. The number won't show up on your phone bill.

24 hours per day

everyday

FREEPHONE

0800 1111

Papyrus

HOPE Line UK

For children, teenagers and young people up to 35. National Confidential Helpline.  If you are a young person at risk of suicide or are worried about a young person at risk of suicide

 

Mon-Fri 10 – 10

W/E 2:pm - 10pm

Bank Holidays

2pm - 5pm

FREEPHONE

0800 068 41 41

 

 

CALM

For men. The Campaign Against Living Miserably (CALM) is dedicated to preventing male suicide, the single biggest killer of men under 45 in the UK.

5pm – Midnight

365 Days per year

FREEPHONE

Nationwide

0800 58 58 58

London

0808 802 5858

Support Line

For everyone. Provides emotional support and details of support groups, helplines, agencies and counsellors throughout the UK

 

Helpline:

01708 765200

Cruse

National Helpline

Staffed by trained bereavement volunteers, who offer emotional support to anyone affected by bereavement.  To help you talk things through, or signpost you to your local Cruse service and other sources of information.

Monday-Friday   9.30-5pm (excluding bank holidays) Tues, Wed &Thursday 9.30am  – 8pm

FREEPHONE

0808 808 1677‚Äč

Maytree

A sanctuary, supporting people in suicidal crisis in a non-medical setting. Free 4-night/5-day stay, and the opportunity to be befriended and heard in complete confidence, without judgement and with compassion.

24 hours a day, 365 days a year.

020 7263 7070

LOCAL GROUPS

 

ORGANIZATION

 

SERVICE

TIME

TELEPHONE

Lifecraft

Suicide Bereavement Support Service. Contact point for family and friends for support and information on bereavement by suicide.

Email: Fiona@lifecraft.org.uk

10 – 5pm

Monday to Friday

01223 566957

Mind Cambridgeshire & Peterborough

A range of services to support those recovering from mental health challenges.

Email:

enquiries@cpslmind.org.uk

Cambridge

Peterborough

St, Neots

01223 311320

01733 362990

01480 470480

Cruse

Bereavement care with a helpline to talk to someone about bereavement.

Email: cambridge@cruse.org.uk

9.30am - 1.30pm

Monday to Friday

01223 633536

NHS Cambridge & Peterborough

Foundation Trust

Suicide bereavement support group. Warm welcome assured, contact Jane Pope (07973 8835110 or Mary Hanna (07887 655713).

Email: chaplaincyteam@cpft.hns.uk

6pm – 7.30

Monday monthly

Peterborough

01733 776080

 

Compassionate Friends

Support group for parents bereaved through suicide.

Email: p.wilson34@ntlworld.com

7.30 – 9.30 Cambridge 1st Tues of each month

Rosemary Wilson

 

WEB SITES

 

ORGANIZATION

SERVICE

 

 

Hub of Hope

A place to go to for those who are struggling, to locate the nearest service available to you, as well as national organisations. A web based app makes it as easy as possible for people to find help and support around them.  Simply enter the post code and search.

Support After Suicide

For everyone. We are a network of organisations who support people who are affected by suicide.

 

If U Care Share

IUCSF offers the opportunity to speak to other people who have life experience around suicide. We offer 1 to 1 practical and emotional support. We are also available to offer practical advice on the procedures that take place when there is a death by suicide. Helpline: 0191 387 5661

 

Bereavement UK

We aim to provide you with bereavement support and information when you need it the site is available at your fingertips.

 

Students Against Depression

Students Against Depression provides you with the resources you need to find a way forward from stress, low mood, depression or suicidal thinking.

 

The Way Foundation

For men and women aged 50 or under when their partner died. It’s a peer-to-peer support group run by a network of volunteers who have been bereaved at a young age themselves

 

NHS Choices

For everyone.  It may be difficult at this time, but it's important to know you're not beyond help and you're not alone.  Many people who've had suicidal thoughts have found with support and treatment they have been able to allow the negative feelings to pass.

 

CHUMS

 

CHUMS Mental Health & Emotional Wellbeing Service for Children and Young People provides therapeutic support in a variety of ways.

 

Alliance of Hope

For Suicide Loss Survivors provides healing support for people coping with the shock, excruciating grief and complex emotions that accompany the loss of a loved one to suicide.

 

Keep Your Head

Keep Your Head brings together reliable information on mental health and wellbeing for children, young people and adults across Cambridgeshire & Peterborough.

BOOKS AND LITERATURE

AUTHOR & PUBLISHER

 

TITLE

Adele Ryan McDowell, Whiteflower Press

Making Peace with Suicide: A Book of Hope, Understanding, and Comfort 

Ann Smolin, Simon & Schuster

Healing After the Suicide of a Love One

Ann Smolin, Simon & Schuster

Healing After the Suicide of a Relative

Alison Wertheimer, Taylor & Francis Ltd

A Special Scar: The Experiences Of People Bereaved By Suicide

Carla Fine, Bantam Doubleday Dell 

No Time to Say Goodbye

Cobain & Larch, Simon & Schuster

Dying to Be Free: A Healing Guide for Families After a Suicide 

Edwin S Shneidman, Oxford University Press

Making Peace with Suicide: A Book of Hope, Understanding, and Comfort

Lukas & Seidon, Jessica Kingsley

Silent Grief: Living in the Wake of Suicide 

Myers & Fine, Jessica Kingsley

Touched by Suicide: Hope and Healing After Loss

General Grief

 

 

Boydell,K (2005), London Vermilion

Death and how to survive it.                                                                                  A practical and uplifting guide to coming to terms with the loss of your partner.

Ginsburg, GD (1997), Tuscon AZ: Fisher Books

Widow to Widow. Thoughtful, Practical ideas for Rebuilding Your life.

Munday J S (2005), Skokie IL : ACTA Publications

Overcoming Grief: Joining and Participating in a Bereavement Support Group.

Noel &Blair PA (2008), Naperville IL Sourcebooks

I  Wasn’t Ready to Say Goodbye.

Hartley Jill (2008), Morleys Print and Publishing

My True Son An anthology.

Hartley Gill. ( 2011), Morleys Print and Publishing

Aspects of Loss. A companion for Bereaved Parents and their families.

 

*Some information gathered from www.nhs.uk and the services listed.

Support Services

LOCAL SUPPORT

Due to COVID-19, some services have had to change how they are operating in order to keep everyone safe. We are doing out best to keep information up to date, to see updates from each of the services please check the providers website. We are also doing our best to include updates here.

Qwell, a new online addition to the Good Life Service is now avaliable.

CPSL MIND: "Qwell is a free, online support and wellbeing community for adults in Cambridgeshire and Peterborough. By providing online support in addition to our community-based services, we are ensuring that mental health support is as accessible as possible for everyone regardless of their circumstances."

Skip to: Bereavement, Eating DisordersOlder People, Self Harm, Suicide, Stress, Sexual Abuse, Domestic Abuse, PTSD, Drug/Alcohol Abuse, Pregnancy, Social Isolation, Anxiety and/or Depression, Disability, Personality Disorders, Young People, LGBTQ, Victims & Witnesses, Physical Activities, Volunteering, Money, Housing, Employment, Other

 

Bereavement Services:


  • Help is at Hand logoHelp is at Hand - A booklet specifically written for those bereaved by suicide by those who have also been affected by suicide.  The booklet gives practical information as well as details of further support.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                          

  • lifecraft logoLifecraft Suicide Bereavement Support Service - (Self-Refer) - The service aims to ensure information and access to support is available to those bereaved by suicide. The service is available to family and friends in the Cambridgeshire and Peterborough area.

  • Child brereavment logoChild Bereavement UK - Supports families and educates professionals when a child or baby of any age dies or is dying, or when a child is facing bereavement.                                                                                                                                                                                                

  • Sue Ryder hospice logoSue Ryder Thorpe Hall Hospice - The hospice’s family support team offers individual and group support pre and post bereavement. Trained staff and volunteers also facilitate the monthly walking group Wayfinders. Support for bereaved children aged six to 11 is available through the Charlie Chimp Club.                                                                                                                                                                                               

  • Arthur rank house logo
    Arthur Rank House Hospice, Cambridge - (Self-Refer) -
    Offers bereavement support to the families of patients who have received care from one of their services. Keith Morrison (Chaplain), Email: keith.morrison@arhc.org.uk, Tel: 01223 675777                                                                                                                                                                                               

  • Sue Ryder hospice logoSue Ryder St John's Hospice - Offers bereavement support to families and friends of patients cared for at the hospice. Jane Maxfield, Family Support & Bereavement Co-ordinator.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                         

  • CPFT logoCPFT Bereavement Support Group - (Self-Refer) - These are held on the second Monday evening of each month, but please ring to check the date if you were not at the previous meeting. The meetings take place from 6pm-7.30pm at: Quaker Meeting House 21 Thorpe Road Peterborough PE3 6AB. If you are attending the group for the first time, it’s really important you contact us first so we can get some details from you and have a chat about the format of the meetings. Please give us a ring (details in leaflet link).                                                                                                       

  • Arthur rank house logoThe Alan Hudson Day Treatment Centre - (Self-Refer) - The Alan Hudson Day Treatment Centre based at North Cambs Hospital in Wisbech, is a day centre supporting people who are living with a life-limiting illness. They also run a support day three times a year for bereaved relatives.                                                                                                                                                                                               

  • uni of cambridge logoCambridge University Counselling Service - (Self-Refer) - This free service is for enrolled students and staff of the University of Cambridge. (Offers Counselling)                                                                                                                                                                                               
  • Anglia ruskin logoAnglia Ruskin University Counselling and Wellbeing Service - (Self-Refer) - The Counselling and Wellbeing Service is available to all students at Anglia Ruskin University and offers a free and confidential service to promote mental health and wellbeing. (Offers Counselling)                                                                             

  • Compassionate friends logoThe Compassionate Friends - (Self-Refer) -
    The Compassionate Friends
    offer many different kinds of support for bereaved families. Whatever the cause of your loss, wherever you are in the UK, and whatever your circumstances – we are here to help. There is currently a support group being held on the first Tuesday of every month in Cambridge for parents who are bereaved by suicide, for more details please contact Rosie at  p.wilson34@ntlworld.com                                                                                                                                                                                                    

  • CPSL Mind logoCPSL MIND - (Self-Refer) - CPSL Mind is a mental health charity which promotes positive wellbeing across our communities and supports people on their road to recovery from a wide range of mental health challenges.They offer online support, community initiatives to connect people, counselling, Cognitive Behavioural Therapy, peer support groups, Perinatal services and opportunities to get involved with training, volunteering, campaigning and fundraising.

  • Insight logoInsight - (Self-Refer) -
    Insight Healthcare provides talking therapies nationwide, predominantly commissioned by the NHS and local authorities, as part of the IAPT (Improving Access to Psychological Therapies) programme. Currently providing 14 free-to-access talking therapy services throughout the country, we are the largest not-for-profit provider in the country. We also provide Wellbeing at Work employee assistance programmes, which enable employers to provide their staff with access to wellbeing support through a 24-hour counselling and advice helpline, a range of resources, and a web portal. (Offers Counselling)                                                                                                                                                                                              

  • cruse bereavement logoCruse - (Self-Refer) -
    Cruse bereavement support have several local support services all over the UK. Cruse o
    ffer support, advice and information to children, young people and adults when someone dies and work to enhance society’s care of bereaved people.                                                                                                                                                                                               

  • Sands logoSANDS - (Self-Refer) - Sands exists to support anyone affected by the death of a baby, to improve the bereavement care received by parents and families, and to influence policy makers and promote research to reduce the number of babies dying.

  • Petals logoPetals - (Self-Refer) - Petals (Pregnancy Expectations Trauma and Loss Society) provides a specialised counselling service at Addenbrookes Hospital in Cambridge, Queen Charlottes and St Mary’s Hospitals in London, the John Radcliffe Hospital in Oxford, and Ipswich Hospital. Petals was set up as a charity in 2011 by a group of healthcare professionals working in maternity care, alongside women who had experienced first-hand the loss of a baby, or trauma during birth.(Offers Counselling)                                                                       
  • Strongmen logoStrongmen - (Self-Refer) - Strongmen are a start-up non-profit organisation with aims and ambitions to tackle emotional and mental health issues brought about by the suffering from bereavement. StrongMen will initially provide and deliver, FREE weekend breaks for men aged between 18 and 55 who have suffered the bereavement of a spouse, child, parent or sibling.

 

 

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Eating Disorders Services:


  • CPFT logoEating Disorder Service -
    Cambridgeshire & Peterborough Foundation Trust run the Eating Disorder Service locally. Most people will be seen as outpatients, with a small number requiring a hospital stay. To access support for an eating disorder, please visit your GP.                                                                                                                                                                                               

  • Peds logoPersonalised Eating Disorder Support (PEDS) - (Self-Refer) - A specialist eating disorder charity based in Peterborough, supporting individuals locally and around the country and further afield via our Skype and email services.(Offers Counselling)

  • CPFT logo
    CPFT
    have some services that provide support and help with eating disorders. For example:

 

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Older People Services:


  • Alzheimers society logoAlzheimer's Society - (Self-Refer) - Provides a range of services for people with dementia, their families and their carers. Click here for a leaflet of their current services in Peterborough. Alzheimer’s Society also has a large range of services across Cambridgeshire and Peterborough, online there is a postcode search facility on the national website.

  • Age uk logoAge UK - (Self-Refer) - The information officers will help with all enquiries relating to older people living in Cambridgeshire.They can provide information or signpost to the appropriate services.Eg: safeguarding, benefits, care, finances, transport, respite, housing, aids & adaptions, bereavement, health and much more with the aim of promoting the health and wellbeing for older people, rights based advice and help you make social connections to reduce loneliness.
  • Care network cambs logoCare Network Cambridgeshire - Care Network provides help for vulnerable & older, isolated people living in Cambridgeshire - enabling them to remain independent and maintain social contact with friends and the community.  We equip, encourage and enable volunteers to support local people to lead a happy, healthy and independent life. Please note that referral is needed for practical help in the home.                                                                                                                                                                                               
  • Caring Together logoCaring Together - (Self-Refer) - Caring Together (formerly Carers Trust Cambridgeshire) is a network partner of Carers Trust, providing more services and more help for family carers and their families across the county.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                               
  • Bobby scheme logoThe Bobby Scheme - (Self-Refer) - The Bobby Scheme secures homes of victims aged 60 and over, domestic abuse victims and people who feel at risk who are aged 65 and over or disabled residents.

                                                                                                                                  

  • NHS 111 Mental Health Crisis Picture
    First Response Service - (Self-Refer) -
    A 24-hour service for people in a mental health crisis, you can access this by dialing 111 and then choosing option 2. This service is for anyone, of any age, living in Cambridgeshire and Peterborough (for some areas like Wisbech you will need to ask for option 2 when you get through to a provider who will pass you on). The phone will be answered by a trained mental health professional who will be able to listen to your concerns and help you get the support you need. They can offer advice over the phone, put you in contact with the crisis services or even refer you to a Sanctuary - safe places run by Cambridgeshire, Peterborough and South Lincolnshire Mind (CPSL Mind).                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              
  • CPSL Mind logoCPSL MIND - (Self-Refer) - CPSL Mind is a mental health charity which promotes positive wellbeing across our communities and supports people on their road to recovery from a wide range of mental health challenges.They offer online support, community initiatives to connect people, counselling, Cognitive Behavioural Therapy, peer support groups, Perinatal services and opportunities to get involved with training, volunteering, campaigning and fundraising.

  • Cross keys homes logoCross Keys Homes Lifeline - (Self-Refer) -The LifeLine personal alarm is a fast and effective way to get help, 24 hours a day. With just the touch of a button you'll be in direct contact with our Control Centre. We can then call your contacts or the emergency services. So you'll know that help is on its way, immediately.                                                                                                                                                                                               

  • Forever activeForever Active- Forever Active provides exercise / activity sessions for the over 50 age group within Cambridgeshire. There are over 50 different sessions on offer, which cater for all ages and abilities. You’re invited to come along and try one of the classes on offer and take steps to becoming a healthier and happier you!

  • Embrace bannerEmbrace - (Self-Refer) - support people over 65 in Huntingdonshire to remain independent in their own homes.

  • Centra logoCentra Support - (Self-Refer) - In the Fenlands - Centra Support provide a free, community support service to anyone over the age of 65 living in Fenland. The service aims to help people live more independently and maintain their accommodation. This service is provided on behalf of Cambridgeshire County Council.

  • supported living logoEast Cambs Older People’s Service - (Self-Refer) -We provide a free, safe and dependable outreach support service for people aged 65 and over living in East Cambridgeshire. We’ll help you to live independently for as long as possible by providing confidential, emotional, financial and practical support. Our fully trained, qualified and friendly staff will visit you in your home and provide you with support on issues.

  • Cambridge CarelineAt Careline 365 we are acutely aware of the challenges faced by older people. As the years advance, health issues can mean that day to day tasks become more difficult. Sometimes this can mean giving up on the idea of living independently altogether. We believe that this doesn’t have to be the way. Our mission is to help as many people as possible live safe and enjoyable later lives. That’s why we strive to offer our service for the best possible price. We also like to keep things simple. Technology need not be confusing or scary – it can have a huge positive impact on the lives of older people.


CPFT logo
CPFT - Cambridgeshire and Peterborough NHS Foundation Trust - provide several services for elderly people:

  • Neighbourhood teams - (Self-Refer) - Neighbourhood teams are the physical and mental health care hub of the local community for over 65-year olds and adults requiring community services. Services include mental health, district nursing, physiotherapy and occupational therapy. Click on the link above for more information.
  • Locality mental health services - (Self-Refer) - Locality mental health services provide mental health support in the community as part of the neighbourhood teams. Click on the link above for more information.
  • Specialist services - (Self-Refer) - Specialist community services include cardiac rehabilitation, CFS/ME, continence, diabetes, dietetics, multiple sclerosis, neuro-rehabilitation, Parkinson's disease, podiatry, respiratory and tuberculosis, speech and language therapy and tissue viability services. Click on the link above for more information.
  • Inpatient wards - (Self-Refer) - We provide a number of mental health inpatient wards as well as physical health wards which provide rehabilitation and end of life care. Click on the link above for more information.
  • Urgent care - (Self-Refer) - We provide three minor injury units in Fenland and Ely and a joint emergency team provides a two to four hour response service for people in their home when they become unwell and need urgent care. Click on the link above for more information.

 

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Self-Harm Services:                                                                                                                                                                                               


  • Samaritans logoSamaritans - (Self-Refer) - We offer a safe place for you to talk anytime you like, in your own way, about what's getting to you.                                       

  • Chums logo
    CHUMS - (Self-Refer) - CHUMS offers individual support, group work, family support, family days, activity days and residential weekends. CHUMS ethos is to support the family as a whole wherever possible and some of our current services directly support adults. We support and empower you to overcome your problems through a range of free confidential services. CHUMS can support young adults up to the age of 25 in Cambridgeshire.(Offers Counselling)

 

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Suicide Services:


  • Samaritans logoSamaritans - (Self-Refer) -Whatever you're going through, call us free any time, from any phone on 116 123. We're here round the clock, 24 hours a day, 365 days a year. If you need a response immediately, it's best to call us on the phone. This number is FREE to call. We’re there for people when they need us, which could be any time of day or night. People talk to us for as long as they like, as many times as they like. We don't rush, interrupt or push anyone out of the door. We let people lead the conversation at their own pace. There's no waiting lists, and no assessments.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                      

  • Help is at Hand logoHelp is at Hand  - A booklet specifically written for those bereaved by suicide by those who have also been affected by suicide. The booklet gives practical information as well as details of further support.

  • Stop Suicide logoSTOP Suicide – CPSL Mind’s STOP Suicide is an award-winning suicide prevention campaign which reaches across Cambridgeshire and Peterborough. It seeks to empower communities and individuals to help stop suicides by being alert to warning signs, asking directly about suicide and helping those who are feeling suicidal to stay safe. 
    You can find information on how to support others and manage suicidal thoughts yourself on their website and there are voluntary opportunities to get involved with campaigning.

  • Help is at Hand logoSupport After Suicide - We are a special interest group of the National Suicide Prevention Alliance who focuses on supporting those bereaved or affected by suicide.

  • NHS 111 Mental Health Crisis Picture
    First Response Service
    - (Self-Refer) -
    A 24-hour service for people in a mental health crisis, you can access this by dialing 111 and then choosing option 2. This service is for anyone, of any age, living in Cambridgeshire and Peterborough (for some areas like Wisbech you will need to ask for option 2 when you get through to a provider who will pass you on). The phone will be answered by a trained mental health professional who will be able to listen to your concerns and help you get the support you need. They can offer advice over the phone, put you in contact with the crisis services or even refer you to a Sanctuary - safe places run by Cambridgeshire, Peterborough and South Lincolnshire Mind (CPSL Mind).                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              

  • lifecraft logoLifecraft Suicide Bereavement Support Service - (Self-Refer) - The service aims to ensure information and access to support is available to those bereaved by suicide. The service is available to family and friends in the Cambridgeshire and Peterborough area.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 

  • lifecraft logoLifeline - (Self-Refer) - Lifeline is a free, confidential and anonymous telephone helpline service that is available from 7.00pm – 11.00pm 365 days of the year, you can call it on 0808 808 2121. The Line provides listening support and information to someone experiencing mental distress or if you are supporting someone in distress.

 

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Sexual and Domestic Abuse Services:



  • Choices logoChoices Counselling - (Self-Refer) - Choices offer a confidential counselling service in Cambridge (UK) and surrounding areas for women and men whose lives are affected by childhood sexual abuse.(Offers Counselling)

  • Muslim womens network logoMuslim Women's Network UK - (Self-Refer) -
    The overall goal of the helpline is to provide a national specialist faith and culturally sensitive service that is confidential and non-judgmental, which offers information, support, guidance and referrals to Asian and Muslim women and girls from diverse ethnic / faith backgrounds who are suffering from or at risk of abuse or facing problems on a range of issues. The helpline also acts as an interface or conduit between the victims and services that offer a concrete response to the request for help.                                                                                                                                                                                               

  • Womens aid logoWomen's Aid - (Self-Refer) - Women’s Aid is the national charity working to end domestic abuse against women and children.

  • Mens advice line logoMen's Advice Line - (Self-Refer) - Help and support for male victims of domestic violence. Men's Advice Line: a confidential helpline for any man experiencing domestic violence and abuse from a partner (or ex-partner).                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                               

  • Cambs rap crisis care logoCambridge Rape Crisis Centre - (Self-Refer) - Deliver a range of support services to women and children in Cambridgeshire who are survivors of rape, sexual abuse and violence.(Offers Counselling)
  • Rape crisis partnership logoPeterborough Rape Crisis Centre - (Self-Refer) - is committed to supporting and empowering female survivors of rape and sexual abuse, regardless of race, ethnicity, sexuality, age and other discriminatory factors respecting individual lifestyles through the provision of a confidential telephone help line, a face to face support service and other appropriate support mechanisms.(Offers Counselling)                                                                                                                                          

  • PRCCG logoCambridge & Peterborough Rape Crisis Partnership - (Self-Refer) - The Cambridge and Peterborough Rape Crisis Partnership (CAPRCP) comprises two independent dedicated specialist sexual violence organisations, Cambridge Rape Crisis Centre (CRCC) and Peterborough Rape Crisis Care Group (PRCCG). The partnership has over 60 years’ combined experience in the design and delivery of specialist support services to survivors of rape and sexual abuse, regardless of when the abuse happened. Our core purpose is to alleviate the psychological and emotional trauma that affects survivors of sexual violence and assist them to overcome both the short and long-term effects of sexual violence whilst they work to regain control of their lives and make positive decisions about their future.(Offers Counselling)                                                                                   
  • Cambs constabulary logoCambridgeshire Constabulary - Being a victim of crime can affect our mental health, the Victims and Witness Hub provides a variety of information that may be of help. There is also a variety of other useful information on support available on the Cambridgeshire Constabulary website.

  • Cambs pboro domestic sexual abuse logoDomestic Abuse and Sexual Violence Partnership - (Self-Refer) -The Cambridgeshire and Peterborough Domestic Abuse and Sexual Violence Partnership is made up of key agencies in the county that have a role in preventing, and providing services and support to survivors of, Domestic Abuse and Sexual Violence.

  • The Elms logoThe Elms - SARC - (Self-Refer) -The Elms SARC offers free support and practical help to anyone in Cambridgeshire who has experienced
    sexual violence and/or sexual abuse. Our service is completely confidential and you do not have to give any personal information in order to get help.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                

  • YMCA logoRespect - YMCA Trinity Group - (Self-Refer) - Free workshops to Schools, Colleges & Community groups raising awareness of domestic abuse in young peoples relationships.  Solution focused Counselling for young people affected by domestic abuse.  Family programmes for parents/carers who experience abusive behaviour from their child aged 10 – 17 yrs.  All services are free to access.

 

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PTSD Services:


  • British transport police logoRoad Victims Trust - (Self-Refer) - Supporting the victims of serious road collisions with emotional and practical support. Takes direct referrals from the Road Police Team or self-referral.(Offers Counselling)

  • Combat stress logoCombat Stress - Charity providing free services for ex-servicemen and women with conditions such as post traumatic Stress Disorder (PTDS), depression and anxiety disorder.Support can be residential, community based or financial.

  • Insight logo
    Insight- (Self-Refer) -
    Insight Healthcare provides talking therapies nationwide, predominantly commissioned by the NHS and local authorities, as part of the IAPT (Improving Access to Psychological Therapies) programme. Currently providing 14 free-to-access talking therapy services throughout the country, we are the largest not-for-profit provider in the country. We also provide Wellbeing at Work employee assistance programmes, which enable employers to provide their staff with access to wellbeing support through a 24-hour counselling and advice helpline, a range of resources, and a web portal.(Offers Counselling)

 

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Drug/Alcohol Abuse Treatment Services:

Online support during covid-19:

Cambridgeshire                                                              


  • CPFT logo
    CASUS - Cambridgeshire Child and Adolescent Substance Use Service (Young People)
    - (Self-Refer) - CASUS provide information, support and specialist treatment in Cambridgeshire, around drug and alcohol use, to young people under 18 and their families.
  • The Sanctuary - Peterborough and Cambridge - Telephone 111 and ask for first response. Providing a safe place for people with Mental Health issues, Dual Diagnosis Mental Health and Addiction Issues including Drugs and or Alcohol.

  • CGL logo

    CGL: Change Grow Live - Cambridgeshire - Providing help and support to adults, children, young people and families. There services cover a wide variety of areas including health and wellbeing, substance use, mental health, criminal justice, domestic abuse and homelessness. You can download and fill out their referral form here and a leaflet about the services here.

Peterborough   

  • CGL logoCGL Peterborough - (Self-Refer) - (Adults) Aspire is available to provide support for those with substance misuse issues and support for their families and carers within the Peterborough area. Dedicated staff offer support to the individual in achieving and sustaining recovery. Aspire offers one to one support, medical prescribing, and detoxification as well as structured group work, structured and peer led activities and counselling.
  • CGL logoCGL #POW (Possibilities, Opportunities, Without taking risk) (Young People) - (Self-Refer) -The young people’s drug and alcohol service is a free and confidential service that works with young people and families around their, or their parent’s or carer’s substance use. We offer awareness courses on drugs and alcohol, and tailor made treatment to all those that are referred in to our service based on their needs or goals.    
  • The Sanctuary - Peterborough and Cambridge - Telephone 111 and ask for first response. Providing a safe place for people with Mental Health issues, Dual Diagnosis Mental Health and Addiction Issues including Drugs and or Alcohol.

National Networks available in Cambridgeshire & Peterborough     


  • AA logoNA logoAlcoholics Anonymous/Narcotics anonymous - (Self-Refer) - is a fellowship of men and women who share their experience, strength and hope with each other that they may solve their common problem and help others to recover from alcoholism. The only requirement for membership is a desire to stop drinking. There are no dues or fees for AA membership; we are self-supporting through our own contributions.  There a number of groups that meet across Cambridgeshire and Peterborough.You can find information about the Polish speaking group meetings here.
  • Alcohol Concern - Help, advice and support to manage alcohol intake.

  • Al-Anon Family Groups  - Al-Anon Family Groups provide support to anyone whose life is, or has been, affected by someone else’s drinking, regardless of whether that person is still drinking or not.


  • Frank logoTalk to Frank- is national website that provides Information and advice on drug use for teenagers and family members who are worried about drug use.

  • Drinkaware logoDrinkaware - is an independent charity working to reduce alcohol misuse and harm in the UK, helping people make better choices about drinking.

  • Adfam logoAdfam - is a national UK charity working to improve support for those affected by someone else's substance use.

Recovery Cafes : free, regular, no appointments needed, drop-in cafes where you can find lots of information on recovery from drug and alcohol use, chats with others in recovery and enjoy a free tea or coffee on us.

  • Cambridge: The Edge Café, Brookfield NHS Site, Mill Rd, CB1 3DF, Every Thursday 12-3pm

  • Cambridge: Frazzled Café, Marks & Spencers, Sidney St, Cambridge, CB2 3HH

  • Ely: The Countess Free Church, Ely, Every Monday 10am – 12pm

 

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Pregnancy Services:


  • Tommys logoTommy's - An organisation that provides accredited midwife-led pregnancy health information for parents-to-be, and funds research into the causes of pregnancy loss.

  • Pandas logoPANDAS - (Self-Refer) - Pre And Post Natal Depression Advice and Support (PANDAS) help support and advise any parent who is experiencing a perinatal mental illness. They also inform and guide family members, carers, friends and employers as to how they can support someone who is suffering.

  • Sands logoSANDS - (Self-Refer) - Sands exists to support anyone affected by the death of a baby, to improve the bereavement care received by parents and families, and to influence policy makers and promote research to reduce the number of babies dying.

  • Petals logoPetals - (Self-Refer) - Petals (Pregnancy Expectations Trauma and Loss Society) provides a specialised counselling service at Addenbrookes Hospital in Cambridge, Queen Charlottes and St Mary’s Hospitals in London, the John Radcliffe Hospital in Oxford, and Ipswich Hospital. Petals was set up as a charity in 2011 by a group of healthcare professionals working in maternity care, alongside women who had experienced first-hand the loss of a baby, or trauma during birth.                                                                                                                                                                                               

  • CPSL Mind logoCPSL MIND - (Self-Refer) - CPSL Mind is a mental health charity which promotes positive wellbeing across our communities and supports people on their road to recovery from a wide range of mental health challenges.They offer online support, community initiatives to connect people, counselling, Cognitive Behavioural Therapy, peer support groups, Perinatal services and opportunities to get involved with training, volunteering, campaigning and fundraising.
  • CPSL Mind logo

    CPSL Mind Perinatal Service – (Self-Refer) – CPSL Mind’s Perinatal Team offer a range of courses and peer support groups which help pregnant women and new Mums to stay emotionally healthy on their motherhood journey.

 

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Social Isolation Services:


  • Citizens advice logoCitizens Advice Bureau - (Self-Refer) -Citizens Advice Bureau provides free and confidential advice to everyone. CAB take the time to listen to you and equip you with the information, options and support that fit your needs.

  • Asylum aid logoAsylum Aid - (Self-Refer) - Asylum Aid is an independent, national charity working to secure protection for people seeking refuge in the UK from persecution and human rights abuses abroad. We provide free legal advice and representation to the most vulnerable and excluded asylum seekers.

  • Winter comfort logoWintercomfort  - (Self-Refer) - Wintercomfort supports people who are homeless or at risk of losing their homes in Cambridge. They offer a safe place where people can feel welcome and valued, basic amenities such as meals, showers and laundry facilities. The also offer a range of educational and recreational activities, opportunities to access other agencies (e.g. health service), legal advice and meaningful work and volunteering opportunities through our social enterprises.

  • workroutes logoWorkroutes - (Self-Refer) - Work routes helps unemployed people find and sustain employment. The free service enables jobseekers to improve their skills and employability and create a personal plan to find the right job for them.

  • Make do and mend logoMake Do andMend - (Self-Refer) - Make Do and Mend provide workshops for people who experience mental distress. These workshops aim to promote recovery by developing self-esteem through developing skills. Workshops include areas such as candle making, guitar and cookery. There is a small membership fee to join Make Do and Mend.

  • Tempo SpiceTempo (Was called Spice) - (Self-Refer) - Tempo is a charity that has developed a system of Time Credits as a way of recognising and celebrating the time people give and encouraging more new people to get involved in volunteering. A Time Credit is ‘earned’ for an hour of volunteering and can then be ‘spent’ on an hour of something that person enjoys, such as the theatre, swimming or learning new skills.

  • Camridge ethnic communtiy forum logoCambridge Ethnic Community Forum - (Self-Refer) - CECF is an umbrella organisation for Cambridge and district that provides racial equality services to individuals and groups.  CECF provides a cultural diversity service that helps promote an understanding between people from different ethnic groups and help them be a natural part of Cambridge life. We give special social, cultural, moral and practical support to groups and develop particular projects where needed.  One of our key projects is the Cambridgeshire Human Rights and Equality Support Service (CHESS)

  • Cambs city logoCambridge City Customer Services - (Self-Refer) - Cambridge City Customer Services provide advice relating to any issues regarding Council Tax, Housing Benefit, and Council Tax Reduction, Housing, Homelink and Tenancy Issues.                                                                                                                                                                                               

  • Richmond fellowship logoRichmond Fellowship (Cambridge Employment Service) - (Self-Refer) - We’re a specialist employment service providing support for people recovering from mental health problems to find paid employment, voluntary work, education and training or to retain their current employment.                                                                                                                                                                                               
  • Vivacity logoVivacity Volunteering - (Self-Refer) -Vivacity helps people get involved in making things happen in your city through volunteering. Meet like minded people and develop new skills by volunteering at Vivacity. They also offer training opportunities, career days and exhibition recruitment! Vivacity are passionate about helping people within the community through local involvement opportunities and anyone can volunteer.

  • Extended hands for women logoExtended Hands For Women
    - (Self-Refer) - We are a community based outreach team working proactively with women and girls in the Peterborough area in order to relieve the feelings of isolation, loneliness, marginalisation and rejection in a way which mobilises, befriends and empowers them to achieve social and economic inclusion. In short - “To promote social, emotional and practical support to women”.
                                             


  • Brothers through boxing logoBrothers Through Boxing - (Self-Refer) -Brothers Through Boxing (BTB) is a non–contact Boxercise and general fitness programme designed to help 16-25yr old males live happier, longer lives. BTB is a peer led “go to” project, whereby its main object is to tackle the issue of male isolation and loneliness, by increasing social connections. This is achieved through peer led discussion and the “Road to Resurgence” Handbook. We believe they now accept female referrals also.                                                                                                                                                                       

  • Cambs community arts logoCambridge Community Arts (CCA) - (Self-Refer) -CCA uses the creative process as a tool to empower people by tapping into their own creative resources and improving their mental well-being.  We particularly welcome learners with experience of mental ill-health. Our courses improve art-form skills, confidence and develop creative and supportive communities. We work with talented artists (musicians, producers, directors, actors, film-makers, photographers, poets, story-tellers etc.) experienced at delivering creative learning and inspiring others.                                                                                                                                                                                               

  • Cambridgeshire net logoPositive People Care - (Self-Refer) - We help & support people with mental health problems & other long term illness's, we also support carers who are helping these people. We help you by taking you out on subsidised coach trips twice a month & holidays all arranged for you 3 times a year. We also have Art & Craft sessions weekly.

  • People and animals logoPeople & Animals - (Self-Refer) - People & Animals UK is a Community Interest Company providing animal and land-based therapeutic interventions, activities, education and skills development opportunities for children, young people and adults to support and enhance the physical, emotional and social well-being of individuals and the wider community.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              

  • K9 project logoThe K9 Project - (Self-Refer) - Working alongside children and young people who are in experiencing challenge preventing them from reaching their full potential. Supporting people who want to set up their own canine assisted interventions and projects through established coaching programmes, training packages, workshops and resources. Community cafes in Ely and Ramsey for people and dogs to mix.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                           

  • Fenland volunteer centre logoFenland Volunteer Centre - (Self-Refer) - There are lots of opportunities to get involved. Whatever your age, whatever your interests or abilities, your community needs you! From supporting and helping people to DIY, gardening and conservation, or office and IT skills!                                                           

  • People and animals logoPeople & Animals - (Self-Refer) - Provides animal and land-based therapeutic interventions, activities, education and skills development opportunities for children, young people and adults to support and enhance the physical, emotional and social well-being of individuals and the wider community.Creating opportunities for excluded and vulnerable people to engage, driving social change, supporting coordinated community action in economically marginalized, isolated communities. We utilize the non-threatening appeal of animals and nature-based activities to overcome barriers faced, regardless of physical or learning disability, mental health challenges, age, culture, economic status or background.                                                                                                                                                                              
  • AMC Logo#ANDYSMANCLUB - (Self-refer) - ANDYSMANCLUB are real, non judgmental, talking groups for men. We are the creators of the viral #ITSOKAYTOTALK movement, and hold meetings every week.             
  • safeplacesSafe Places -  Safe Places National Network is here to unite all the Safe Place (and Keep Safe) schemes. We do this by having all the information in one place so everyone can see it. We are making special teaching materials so Safe Places can be taught about in schools. We help make it easier to find and use a Safe Place not just when you need one but as a way of getting to know people. What we do: Provide a special easy to use Web Site to teach about the Safe Place schemes. Encourage badge holders to visit the Safe Places to get to know more people in their community. Promote allowing more user groups to participate in the Safe Places Schemes. Support more authorities in launching a Safe Place Scheme. Help authorities recruit more Safe Places. Help users with our free-to-use phone apps so they can quickly locate a Safe Place in time of need.

  • Butterfly Ladies - The Butterfly Ladies are a group of women who have lived experience with mental health challenges who meet up every Thursday at 10:30am-12:30pm to chat over tea and coffee and support one another at St Mary's Church in Eynesbury. If you would like some more information on the Butterfly Ladies, you can contact Ellie on 07914 307 556 or ellie187@hotmail.co.uk

  • Light Project Peterborough LogoLight Project Peterborough -  The Vision of Light Project Peterborough is: To reveal Jesus’ love by reaching out to and walking alongside the marginalised and those in need and by equipping and enabling those we meet to do the same. We do this by: Sharing our Christian faith, by meeting people wherever they are, Co-operative social action and mission, Providing shelter and support for the homeless, Working in partnership with others, Modelling a loving community where everyone is valued, Communicating stories of good new.

  • Groundwork East LogoGroundwork East - (Self-Refer)  We’re passionate about creating a future where every neighbourhood is vibrant and green, every community is strong and able to shape its own destiny and no-one is held back by their background or circumstances. We help people gain confidence and skills, get into training and work, protect and improve green spaces, lead more active lives and overcome significant challenges such as poverty, isolation, low skills and poor health. Please email ashley.lydiate@groundwork.org.uk to refer yourself.

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Anxiety, Depression and Stress Services:


  • CPSL Mind logoCPSL MIND - (Self-Refer) - CPSL Mind is a mental health charity which promotes positive wellbeing across our communities and supports people on their road to recovery from a wide range of mental health challenges.They offer online support, community initiatives to connect people, counselling, Cognitive Behavioural Therapy, peer support groups, Perinatal services and opportunities to get involved with training, volunteering, campaigning and fundraising.
  • good life logoGood Life Service - (Self-Refer) - The Good Life Service focuses on individual strengths and skills. It encourages peer support and community connectivity and is available to adults aged 18 upwards living in Cambridgeshire and Peterborough. It has something for everyone, regardless of whether or not you have a diagnosed mental health problem.
  • Lifeline plus logoLifeline Plus - a mental health and wellbeing helpline for people aged 18 and over living in Cambridgeshire and Peterborough, is available Monday-Friday between 9am and 2pm via freephone 0808 808 2121. The line will support people to manage their wellbeing, provide self-help advice or signpost to other organisations for particular concerns. 7 days a week, between 2pm and 11pm the same number is Lifeline, managed by Lifecraft who provide support for those in mental health distress: 0808 808 2121.
    • CPFT logoPsychological Wellbeing Service - (Self-Refer) - The Psychological Wellbeing Service can offer support to those aged 17 and over via a range of brief supported self-help and talking therapy options. The service usually helps people with mild to moderate mental health issues, including depression, anxiety, post-traumatic stress, panic attacks, phobias or Obsessive Compulsive Disorder. You can self-refer to the service by calling 0300 300 0055 of or via CPFT NHS (click on self-refer psychological wellbeing service).                                                                                                                                                                                                                      

    • Kooth LogoKooth (11- 18 year olds, up to 19th Birthday) - (Self-Refer) - Kooth is a confidential and anonymous online service for young people, specifically developed to make it easy and safe for young people to access mental health support as and when they need it, while removing any associated stigma. Once signed up, Kooth users have access to BACP trained counsellors available until 10pm, 365 days a year, peer-to-peer support through moderated forums, and a range of self-help materials, co-written by other young people. Any young person aged 11 – 18 with a Cambridgeshire or Peterborough postcode can access the service for free.
    • Cogswheel trust logoThe Cogwheel Trust - (Self-Refer) - The Cogwheel Trust provides counselling support for adults and young people aged 6-16 years in Cambridge and the surrounding areas. Parents can refer their child into the service which is based in Cambridge. The Cogwheel Trust is a charity and it asks for donations towards appointments based on income. To find out more visit their website or call 01223 464385.

    • Arts and Minds logoArts and Minds - Arts on Prescription is a series of friendly, weekly art workshops for people experiencing depression, anxiety and/or other mental health problems. Led by a professional artist and a qualified counsellor, they offer the chance to experience working with a wide range of materials and techniques, including drawing, printmaking and sculpture. Sessions last for two hours and are open to all abilities – no experience necessary – and offer the opportunity to work on something creative, stimulating and absorbing with the aim of increasing well-being. A ‘hands-on art workshop’ is a good description of Arts on Prescription, it is important to understand that it is not art therapy, although participants find it therapeutic!  The counsellor is there in case anything comes up, which sometimes happens, but generally, the artist and counsellor co-facilitate the workshop by taking part in the creative activities alongside the participants. For more information on how to be referred to the service visit the website.
    • Make do and mend logoMake Do andMend - (Self-Refer) - Make Do and Mend provide workshops for people who experience mental distress. These workshops aim to promote recovery by developing self-esteem through developing skills. Workshops include areas such as candle making, guitar and cookery. There is a small membership fee to join Make Do and Mend.

    • Insight logo
      Insight - (Self-Refer) - Insight Healthcare provides talking therapies nationwide, predominantly commissioned by the NHS and local authorities, as part of the IAPT (Improving Access to Psychological Therapies) programme. Currently providing 14 free-to-access talking therapy services throughout the country, we are the largest not-for-profit provider in the country.
      We also provide Wellbeing at Work employee assistance programmes, which enable employers to provide their staff with access to wellbeing support through a 24-hour counselling and advice helpline, a range of resources, and a web portal.                                                                                                                                                                                               
    • CPFT logoCameo - (Self-Refer) - Cameo is an early intervention service for psychosis. The service provides support for individuals, families, carers and friends. Cameo is funded and provided by CPFT (Cambridgeshire and Peterborough NHS Foundation Trust).                                                                                                                                                                                                


    • lifecraft logoLifecraft - Lifecraft is a user-led organisation for adults in the Cambridge area who have experience of mental health difficulties in their lives. Services include creative activities, recovery groups, social activities and employment and volunteering opportunities. Lifecraft also have an Information Hub, a counselling service and Lifeline, a telephone helpline that runs 365 days a year, you can call on 0808 808 2121.
    • everyone health logoEveryone Health - The High Risk Health Trainer service will work closely to support patients with serious mental illness focusing on key lifestyle behaviours such as diet, exercise and wellbeing and signposting to other relevant services. This can be anyone who has any diagnosable mental health illness such as anxiety, depression, bipolar, psychosis, schizophrenia or personality disorder. Appointments are on a 1to1 basis and consist of up to eight 45 minute appointments. You can contact their Clinical Contact Centre on 0333 005 0093


    • Cambs consultancy counselling logoCambridgeshire Consultancy in Counselling - (Self-Refer) - CCC is a mental health charity providing affordable counselling and related services to organisations and to those in the local community who either can't afford to pay market rates or wait for a GP appointment, ensuring a lack of funds is no barrier to getting help. CCC supports people with a wide variety of problems; including anxiety, depression, sexual abuse, critical or chronic illness, disability, life change and many more.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                            

    • Richmond fellowship logoRichmond Fellowship (Cambridge Employment Service) - (Self-Refer) - We’re a specialist employment service providing support for people recovering from mental health problems to find paid employment, voluntary work, education and training or to retain their current employment.                                                                                                                                                                                               

    • Richmond fellowship logoRichmond Fellowship (Fenland Wellbeing Website) - (Self-Refer) - We’re a specialist employment service providing support for people recovering from mental health problems, including Autism and Asperger's, to find paid employment, voluntary work, education and training or to retain their current employment. The Wellbeing Service works with people aged 18–64 who live in Fenland – North Cambridgeshire. The service supports people who are experiencing mental distress to the extent that it is impacting on their lives and sense of wellbeing.

    • Insight logo
      Insight  (Peterborough and Cambridgeshire) - (Self-Refer) - Insight talking therapies is a free and confidential service, commissioned by the NHS, and is available to anyone aged 17 and over and living in the Peterborough or Cambridgeshire area.                                                                                                                                                                                               

    • Illuminate logoIlluminate
       - (Self-Refer) -
      Illuminate is a registered charity, providing coaching and personal development courses throughout the East of England. Based in Cambridge we help people who have experienced a setback including mental ill health, and are unemployed or on a minimal income. Through our work we rebuild self-confidence, enabling sustainable positive changes, improving lives for the better.                                                                                                                                                                                                                   
    • Frazzled cafe logoFrazzled Café - (Self-Refer) - Frazzled Cafe is a registered charity that operates with the purpose of providing a safe, anonymous and non-judgemental environment where people who are feeling frazzled can meet on a regular basis to talk and share their personal stories. Frazzled Cafe is for the four-in-four feeling frazzled and overwhelmed by the stresses of modern life. With the support of Marks & Spencer we are currently running fortnightly Frazzled Cafe meetings in Brighton, Cambridge, Leeds, Liverpool, London (Marble Arch, Victoria & Stratford), Newcastle, Norwich and Wolstanton in Staffordshire. Please bear in mind that these meetings are not therapy sessions. If you are currently suffering from serious mental illness it may not be appropriate to attend.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    

    • People and animals logoPeople & Animals - (Self-Refer) - Provides animal and land-based therapeutic interventions, activities, education and skills development opportunities for children, young people and adults to support and enhance the physical, emotional and social well-being of individuals and the wider community.Creating opportunities for excluded and vulnerable people to engage, driving social change, supporting coordinated community action in economically marginalized, isolated communities. We utilize the non-threatening appeal of animals and nature-based activities to overcome barriers faced, regardless of physical or learning disability, mental health challenges, age, culture, economic status or background.                                                                                         
    • MyHealth Cambridgeshire & Peterborough App - The MyHealth app provides up-to-date information about the locations and opening times of a range of health services in the area, including some mental health services. Search for ‘MyHealth Cambridgeshire & Peterborough’ in the Android or Apple app store to download.                                                                                                                                                                                          
    • Group Therapy CentreGroup Therapy Centre - The Group Therapy Centre is a long-established, not-for-profit, psychological treatment service, and is unique in providing both short and long-term group therapy. We treat a wide variety of conditions ranging from Depression and Anxiety to more serious conditions such as Bipolar and Personality Disorders. We offer CBT, Schema and Long term open ended group therapy. CBT services are free, other services incur a fee based on ability to pay.                                                                                                                                                         
    • Silver clous logoSilver Cloud - (Self-Refer) - Sliver cloud is an online programme run by the CPFT that is designed to help you learn techniques to overcome symptoms of low mood and anxiety. Silver Cloud is a flexible programme, that you can access anywhere, whether at home, work or elsewhere. You can use it on your computer tablet of mobile phone. You can work at your own pace, with regular reviews from your therapist who will help and guide you through the programme.                                                                                                                                                                                               

    • Head 2 Toe logoHead To Toe CharityWith your support, Head to Toe can help our amazing NHS staff to provide even better care and treatment, while raising public understanding of the challenges experienced by the people that CPFT serve. Every penny you give will enhance the services that CPFT provides and support people of all ages receiving mental health, community and social care across Cambridgeshire and Peterborough.
    • H.A.Y. (How Are You Cambridgeshire) has wellbeing tips.

      H.A.Y. (How Are You Peterborough) has wellbeing tips.

    • Recovery College EastThe Recovery College East runs courses designed to help you in your Recovery. The details and prospectus can be found on their website.

    • AMC Logo#ANDYSMANCLUB - (Self-refer) - ANDYSMANCLUB are real, non judgmental, talking groups for men. We are the creators of the viral #ITSOKAYTOTALK movement, and hold meetings every week.             

                                                                                                                                                                                                   
    • Recovery Coach Team - (Self-Refer) - A service available to help offer support for people who have accessed secondary services and about to be discharged back to primary care (GP). Their contact details are recoverycoachteamreferrals@cpft.nhs.co.uk and their website link.


    CPFT logo
    CPFT - (Self-Refer) - Cambridgeshire and Peterborough NHS Foundation Trust - provide several services for people with mental health challenges:

     

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    Disability Help Services:


    • National autistic societyNational Autism Society - (Self-Refer) - NAS are the leading UK charity for people with autism (including Asperger syndrome) and their families. We provide information, support and pioneering services, and campaign for a better world for people with autism.

    • CDA logoCambridgeshire Deaf Association - (Self-Refer) - CDA provide services for deaf people across Cambridgeshire and we provide deafness related training.

    • family actionFamily Action  - (Self-Refer) - Family Action - Family Hurdles Additional Needs Support - A 'Social Prescribing' project for families with a child with ASD or ADHD. Family Action is a charity commited to building stronger families by delivering innovative and effective services and support that reaches out to many of the UK's most vulnerable people.

    • Camsight logoCamSight - (Self-Refer) - Cam Sight is a local charity embedded in the community, working with 1,800 people living with low vision and blindness in Cambridgeshire. Cam Sight is a life-long resource for all ages. Our mission is to support local people of all ages with low vision and blindness to live the lives they choose. We aim to enhance independence, improve well-being, and increase inclusion. We bring visually impaired children and families together and support older people with sight loss to remain a valued part of their communities, ensuring they have the information, support, and technology they need to remain independent.                                                                                                                                                                                               

    • Hunts society for the blind logoHunts Blind - (Self-Refer) - Huntingdonshire Society for the Blind is an independent, local charity dedicated to supporting people with sight impairment who live in the old county of Huntingdonshire.

    • Cambs consultancy counselling logoCambridgeshire Consultancy in Counselling - (Self-Refer) - CCC is a mental health charity providing affordable counselling and related services to organisations and to those in the local community who either can't afford to pay market rates or wait for a GP appointment, ensuring a lack of funds is no barrier to getting help. CCC supports people with a wide variety of problems; including anxiety, depression, sexual abuse, critical or chronic illness, disability, life change and many more.                                                                                                                                                  

    • Disability logoDIAL - (Self-Refer) - Disability Peterborough is your local centre for free confidential and impartial information and advice, for physically disabled people, their carers and families. The purpose of Disability Peterborough is to provide a range of services that assist people with physical disabilities to achieve their potential and have maximum choice and control over their lives.  The information and help we provide can enable anyone, living in Peterborough, with a disability gain the freedom and support they are entitled to. We hold a Legal Services Quality Mark for disability case work.                                                                                                                                                                                                                       

    • isle of ely society for the blind logoIsle of Ely Society for the Blind - (Self-Refer) - At Isle of Ely Society for the Blind we are dedicated to giving high levels of care, understanding and temperament to those less able to see across North East Cambridgeshire, from north Tydd St Giles and south Ely, Stretham.                                                                                                                                                                                               

    • deafblind uk logoDeafBlindUK - (Self-Refer) - We support people with combined sight and hearing loss to live the lives they want. Whether you need some support to get back on your feet after a diagnosis, a helping hand to help you do the things you love, someone to turn to when you’re feeling low or some information, advice and guidance, we’re here to help.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                

    • Cambs invisible illness support logoCambridgeshire Invisible Illness Support (CIIS) - (Self-Refer) - CIIS offers friendship, community, meet up, social events and reassurance. We aim to provide a safe place to offload, discuss, learn and share experiences. We aim to work with local Physical and Mental Health Services to raise awareness of invisible illnesses and work collaboratively to strive to improve services.                                                                                                                                                                                               

    • Disability logoDisability Peterborough (DIAL) - DIAL Peterborough is your local centre for free confidential and impartial information and advice, for physically disabled people, their carers and families. The purpose of DIAL Peterborough is to provide a range of services that assist people with physical disabilities to achieve their potential and have maximum choice and control over their lives.   The information and help we provide can enable anyone, living in Peterborough, with a disability gain the freedom and support they are entitled to. We hold a Legal Services Quality Mark for disability case work.                                                                                                                                                                 

    • Little miracles logoLittle Miracles - (Self-Refer) - Little Miracles is a charity for families of children that have additional needs, disabilities and life limiting conditions. We can take families with children before birth till the age of 25 and can offer support to siblings and grandparents. They offer counselling (both adults and children), family support, benefits advice, play services and play therapy. It's service is free and for referrals please call on 01733 262226 or email clinicalteam@littlemiraclescharity.org.uk                                                                                                                                                                      

    • People and animals logoPeople & Animals - (Self-Refer) - Provides animal and land-based therapeutic interventions, activities, education and skills development opportunities for children, young people and adults to support and enhance the physical, emotional and social well-being of individuals and the wider community.Creating opportunities for excluded and vulnerable people to engage, driving social change, supporting coordinated community action in economically marginalized, isolated communities. We utilize the non-threatening appeal of animals and nature-based activities to overcome barriers faced, regardless of physical or learning disability, mental health challenges, age, culture, economic status or background.

    • Making Space - Advice and Support service for people and c